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1.  Pharmacokinetics and Placental Transfer of Single-Dose Tenofovir 1% Vaginal Gel in Term Pregnancy 
The Journal of Infectious Diseases  2011;204(10):1527-1531.
Tenofovir (TFV) 1% vaginal gel has been found to decrease sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. To initiate investigations during pregnancy, 16 healthy pregnant women scheduled for cesarean delivery received a single application of TFV gel preoperatively. Maternal serum drug concentrations were determined and fetal cord blood, amniotic fluid, placental tissue, and endometrial tissue specimens were collected. The median maternal peak concentration and cord blood TFV concentrations were 4.3 and 1.9 ng/mL, respectively (∼100- and 40-fold lower than after TFV oral dosing, respectively). No adverse events were related to the use of TFV gel. These findings support ongoing and future investigations of TFV gel in pregnancy.
Clinical Trial Registration: NCT00572273. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00540605?term=mtn-002&rank=1.
doi:10.1093/infdis/jir562
PMCID: PMC3192189  PMID: 21930612
2.  Is Wetter Better? An Evaluation of Over-the-Counter Personal Lubricants for Safety and Anti-HIV-1 Activity 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(11):e48328.
Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0048328
PMCID: PMC3492332  PMID: 23144863

Results 1-2 (2)