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1.  Structural and functional brain connectivity in presymptomatic familial frontotemporal dementia 
Neurology  2013;80(9):814-823.
Objective:
We aimed to investigate whether cognitive deficits and structural and functional connectivity changes can be detected before symptom onset in a large cohort of carriers of microtubule-associated protein tau and progranulin mutations.
Methods:
In this case-control study, 75 healthy individuals (aged 20–70 years) with 50% risk for frontotemporal dementia (FTD) underwent DNA screening, neuropsychological assessment, and structural and functional MRI. We used voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics for voxelwise analyses of gray matter volume and diffusion tensor imaging measures. Using resting-state fMRI scans, we assessed whole-brain functional connectivity to frontoinsula, anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC), and posterior cingulate cortex.
Results:
Although carriers (n = 37) and noncarriers (n = 38) had similar neuropsychological performance, worse performance on Stroop III, Ekman faces, and Happé cartoons correlated with higher age in carriers, but not controls. Reduced fractional anisotropy and increased radial diffusivity throughout frontotemporal white matter tracts were found in carriers and correlated with higher age. Reductions in functional aMCC connectivity were found in carriers compared with controls, and connectivity between frontoinsula and aMCC seeds and several brain regions significantly decreased with higher age in carriers but not controls. We found no significant differences or age correlations in posterior cingulate cortex connectivity. No differences in regional gray matter volume were found.
Conclusions:
This study convincingly demonstrates that alterations in structural and functional connectivity develop before the first symptoms of FTD arise. These findings suggest that diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state fMRI may have the potential to become sensitive biomarkers for early FTD in future clinical trials.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e31828407bc
PMCID: PMC3598452  PMID: 23390180
2.  A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is the cause of chromosome 9p21-linked ALS-FTD 
Renton, Alan E. | Majounie, Elisa | Waite, Adrian | Simón-Sánchez, Javier | Rollinson, Sara | Gibbs, J. Raphael | Schymick, Jennifer C. | Laaksovirta, Hannu | van Swieten, John C. | Myllykangas, Liisa | Kalimo, Hannu | Paetau, Anders | Abramzon, Yevgeniya | Remes, Anne M. | Kaganovich, Alice | Scholz, Sonja W. | Duckworth, Jamie | Ding, Jinhui | Harmer, Daniel W. | Hernandez, Dena G. | Johnson, Janel O. | Mok, Kin | Ryten, Mina | Trabzuni, Danyah | Guerreiro, Rita J. | Orrell, Richard W. | Neal, James | Murray, Alex | Pearson, Justin | Jansen, Iris E. | Sondervan, David | Seelaar, Harro | Blake, Derek | Young, Kate | Halliwell, Nicola | Callister, Janis | Toulson, Greg | Richardson, Anna | Gerhard, Alex | Snowden, Julie | Mann, David | Neary, David | Nalls, Michael A. | Peuralinna, Terhi | Jansson, Lilja | Isoviita, Veli-Matti | Kaivorinne, Anna-Lotta | Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit | Ikonen, Elina | Sulkava, Raimo | Benatar, Michael | Wuu, Joanne | Chiò, Adriano | Restagno, Gabriella | Borghero, Giuseppe | Sabatelli, Mario | Heckerman, David | Rogaeva, Ekaterina | Zinman, Lorne | Rothstein, Jeffrey | Sendtner, Michael | Drepper, Carsten | Eichler, Evan E. | Alkan, Can | Abdullaev, Zied | Pack, Svetlana D. | Dutra, Amalia | Pak, Evgenia | Hardy, John | Singleton, Andrew | Williams, Nigel M. | Heutink, Peter | Pickering-Brown, Stuart | Morris, Huw R. | Tienari, Pentti J. | Traynor, Bryan J.
Neuron  2011;72(2):257-268.
The chromosome 9p21 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) locus contains one of the last major unidentified autosomal dominant genes underlying these common neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously shown that a founder haplotype, covering the MOBKL2b, IFNK and C9ORF72 genes, is present in the majority of cases linked to this region. Here we show that there is a large hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72 on the affected haplotype. This repeat expansion segregates perfectly with disease in the Finnish population, underlying 46.0% of familial ALS and 21.1% of sporadic ALS in that population. Taken together with the D90A SOD1 mutation, 87% of familial ALS in Finland is now explained by a simple monogenic cause. The repeat expansion is also present in one third of familial ALS cases of outbred European descent making it the most common genetic cause of these fatal neurodegenerative diseases identified to date.
doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2011.09.010
PMCID: PMC3200438  PMID: 21944779
3.  Sensitivity of revised diagnostic criteria for the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia 
Brain  2011;134(9):2456-2477.
Based on the recent literature and collective experience, an international consortium developed revised guidelines for the diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. The validation process retrospectively reviewed clinical records and compared the sensitivity of proposed and earlier criteria in a multi-site sample of patients with pathologically verified frontotemporal lobar degeneration. According to the revised criteria, ‘possible’ behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia requires three of six clinically discriminating features (disinhibition, apathy/inertia, loss of sympathy/empathy, perseverative/compulsive behaviours, hyperorality and dysexecutive neuropsychological profile). ‘Probable’ behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia adds functional disability and characteristic neuroimaging, while behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia ‘with definite frontotemporal lobar degeneration’ requires histopathological confirmation or a pathogenic mutation. Sixteen brain banks contributed cases meeting histopathological criteria for frontotemporal lobar degeneration and a clinical diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies or vascular dementia at presentation. Cases with predominant primary progressive aphasia or extra-pyramidal syndromes were excluded. In these autopsy-confirmed cases, an experienced neurologist or psychiatrist ascertained clinical features necessary for making a diagnosis according to previous and proposed criteria at presentation. Of 137 cases where features were available for both proposed and previously established criteria, 118 (86%) met ‘possible’ criteria, and 104 (76%) met criteria for ‘probable’ behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. In contrast, 72 cases (53%) met previously established criteria for the syndrome (P < 0.001 for comparison with ‘possible’ and ‘probable’ criteria). Patients who failed to meet revised criteria were significantly older and most had atypical presentations with marked memory impairment. In conclusion, the revised criteria for behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia improve diagnostic accuracy compared with previously established criteria in a sample with known frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Greater sensitivity of the proposed criteria may reflect the optimized diagnostic features, less restrictive exclusion features and a flexible structure that accommodates different initial clinical presentations. Future studies will be needed to establish the reliability and specificity of these revised diagnostic guidelines.
doi:10.1093/brain/awr179
PMCID: PMC3170532  PMID: 21810890
behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia; diagnostic criteria; frontotemporal lobar degeneration; FTD; pathology
4.  Genetic and Clinical Features of Progranulin-Associated Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration 
Archives of neurology  2011;68(4):488-497.
Objective
To assess the relative frequency of unique mutations and their associated characteristics in 97 individuals with mutations in progranulin (GRN), an important cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD).
Participants and Design
A 46-site International Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration Collaboration was formed to collect cases of FTLD with TAR DNA-binding protein of 43-kDa (TDP-43)–positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP). We identified 97 individuals with FTLD-TDP with pathogenic GRN mutations (GRN+ FTLD-TDP), assessed their genetic and clinical characteristics, and compared them with 453 patients with FTLD-TDP in which GRN mutations were excluded (GRN− FTLD-TDP). No patients were known to be related. Neuropathologic characteristics were confirmed as FTLD-TDP in 79 of the 97 GRN+ FTLDTDP cases and all of the GRN− FTLD-TDP cases.
Results
Age at onset of FTLD was younger in patients with GRN+ FTLD-TDP vs GRN− FTLD-TDP (median, 58.0 vs 61.0 years; P<.001), as was age at death (median, 65.5 vs 69.0 years; P<.001). Concomitant motor neuron disease was much less common in GRN+ FTLDTDP vs GRN− FTLD-TDP (5.4% vs 26.3%; P<.001). Fifty different GRN mutations were observed, including 2 novel mutations: c.139delG (p.D47TfsX7) and c.378C>A (p.C126X). The 2 most common GRN mutations were c.1477C>T (p.R493X, found in 18 patients, representing 18.6% of GRN cases) and c.26C>A (p.A9D, found in 6 patients, representing 6.2% of cases). Patients with the c.1477C>T mutation shared a haplotype on chromosome 17; clinically, they resembled patients with other GRN mutations. Patients with the c.26C>A mutation appeared to have a younger age at onset of FTLD and at death and more parkinsonian features than those with other GRN mutations.
Conclusion
GRN+ FTLD-TDP differs in key features from GRN− FTLD-TDP.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2011.53
PMCID: PMC3160280  PMID: 21482928
5.  Symmetrical Corticobasal Syndrome Caused by a Novel c.314dup Progranulin Mutation 
Journal of Molecular Neuroscience  2011;45(3):354-358.
Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is characterised by asymmetrical parkinsonism and cognitive impairment. The underlying pathology varies between corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration sometimes in association with GRN mutations. A 61-year-old male underwent neurological examination, neuropsychological assessment, MRI, and HMPAO-SPECT at our medical centre. After his death at the age of 63, brain autopsy, genetic screening and mRNA expression analysis were performed. The patient presented with slow progressive walking disabilities, non-fluent language problems, behavioural changes and forgetfulness. His family history was negative. He had primitive reflexes, rigidity of his arms and postural instability. Later in the disease course he developed dystonia of his left leg, pathological crying, mutism and dysphagia. Neuropsychological assessment revealed prominent ideomotor and ideational apraxia, executive dysfunction, non-fluent aphasia and memory deficits. Neuroimaging showed symmetrical predominant frontoparietal atrophy and hypoperfusion. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)-TDP type 3 pathology was found at autopsy. GRN sequencing revealed a novel frameshift mutation c.314dup, p.Cys105fs and GRN mRNA levels showed a 50% decrease. We found a novel GRN mutation in a patient with an atypical (CBS) presentation with symmetric neuroimaging findings. GRN mutations are an important cause of CBS associated with FTLD-TDP type 3 pathology, sometimes in sporadic cases. Screening for GRN mutations should also be considered in CBS patients without a positive family history.
doi:10.1007/s12031-011-9626-z
PMCID: PMC3207131  PMID: 21863316
Corticobasal syndrome (CBS); Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD); Progranulin (GRN); TDP-43
6.  Common variants at 7p21 are associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions 
Van Deerlin, Vivianna M. | Sleiman, Patrick M. A. | Martinez-Lage, Maria | Chen-Plotkin, Alice | Wang, Li-San | Graff-Radford, Neill R | Dickson, Dennis W. | Rademakers, Rosa | Boeve, Bradley F. | Grossman, Murray | Arnold, Steven E. | Mann, David M.A. | Pickering-Brown, Stuart M. | Seelaar, Harro | Heutink, Peter | van Swieten, John C. | Murrell, Jill R. | Ghetti, Bernardino | Spina, Salvatore | Grafman, Jordan | Hodges, John | Spillantini, Maria Grazia | Gilman, Sid' | Lieberman, Andrew P. | Kaye, Jeffrey A. | Woltjer, Randall L. | Bigio, Eileen H | Mesulam, Marsel | al-Sarraj, Safa | Troakes, Claire | Rosenberg, Roger N. | White, Charles L. | Ferrer, Isidro | Lladó, Albert | Neumann, Manuela | Kretzschmar, Hans A. | Hulette, Christine Marie | Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A. | Miller, Bruce L | Alzualde, Ainhoa | de Munain, Adolfo Lopez | McKee, Ann C. | Gearing, Marla | Levey, Allan I. | Lah, James J. | Hardy, John | Rohrer, Jonathan D. | Lashley, Tammaryn | Mackenzie, Ian R.A. | Feldman, Howard H. | Hamilton, Ronald L. | Dekosky, Steven T. | van der Zee, Julie | Kumar-Singh, Samir | Van Broeckhoven, Christine | Mayeux, Richard | Vonsattel, Jean Paul G. | Troncoso, Juan C. | Kril, Jillian J | Kwok, John B.J. | Halliday, Glenda M. | Bird, Thomas D. | Ince, Paul G. | Shaw, Pamela J. | Cairns, Nigel J. | Morris, John C. | McLean, Catriona Ann | DeCarli, Charles | Ellis, William G. | Freeman, Stefanie H. | Frosch, Matthew P. | Growdon, John H. | Perl, Daniel P. | Sano, Mary | Bennett, David A. | Schneider, Julie A. | Beach, Thomas G. | Reiman, Eric M. | Woodruff, Bryan K. | Cummings, Jeffrey | Vinters, Harry V. | Miller, Carol A. | Chui, Helena C. | Alafuzoff, Irina | Hartikainen, Päivi | Seilhean, Danielle | Galasko, Douglas | Masliah, Eliezer | Cotman, Carl W. | Tuñón, M. Teresa | Martínez, M. Cristina Caballero | Munoz, David G. | Carroll, Steven L. | Marson, Daniel | Riederer, Peter F. | Bogdanovic, Nenad | Schellenberg, Gerard D. | Hakonarson, Hakon | Trojanowski, John Q. | Lee, Virginia M.-Y.
Nature genetics  2010;42(3):234-239.
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the second most common cause of presenile dementia. The predominant neuropathology is FTLD with TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) inclusions (FTLD-TDP)1. FTLD-TDP is frequently familial resulting from progranulin (GRN) mutations. We assembled an international collaboration to identify susceptibility loci for FTLD-TDP, using genome-wide association (GWA). We found that FTLD-TDP associates with multiple SNPs mapping to a single linkage disequilibrium (LD) block on 7p21 that contains TMEM106B in a GWA study (GWAS) on 515 FTLD-TDP cases. Three SNPs retained genome-wide significance following Bonferroni correction; top SNP rs1990622 (P=1.08×10−11; odds ratio (OR) minor allele (C) 0.61, 95% CI 0.53-0.71). The association replicated in 89 FTLD-TDP cases (rs1990622; P=2×10−4). TMEM106B variants may confer risk by increasing TMEM106B expression. TMEM106B variants also contribute to genetic risk for FTLD-TDP in patients with GRN mutations. Our data implicate TMEM106B as a strong risk factor for FTLD-TDP suggesting an underlying pathogenic mechanism.
doi:10.1038/ng.536
PMCID: PMC2828525  PMID: 20154673
7.  FUS pathology defines the majority of tau- and TDP-43-negative frontotemporal lobar degeneration 
Acta neuropathologica  2010;120(1):33-41.
Through an international consortium, we have collected 37 tau- and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-negative frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) cases, and present here the first comprehensive analysis of these cases in terms of neuropathology, genetics, demographics and clinical data. 92% (34/37) had fused in sarcoma (FUS) protein pathology, indicating that FTLD-FUS is an important FTLD subtype. This FTLD-FUS collection specifically focussed on aFTLD-U cases, one of three recently defined subtypes of FTLD-FUS. The aFTLD-U subtype of FTLD-FUS is characterised clinically by behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and has a particularly young age of onset with a mean of 41 years. Further, this subtype had a high prevalence of psychotic symptoms (36% of cases) and low prevalence of motor symptoms (3% of cases). We did not find FUS mutations in any aFTLD-U case. To date, the only subtype of cases reported to have ubiquitin-positive but tau-, TDP-43- and FUS-negative pathology, termed FTLD-UPS, is the result of charged multivesicular body protein 2B gene (CHMP2B) mutation. We identified three FTLD-UPS cases, which are negative for CHMP2B mutation, suggesting that the full complement of FTLD pathologies is yet to be elucidated.
doi:10.1007/s00401-010-0698-6
PMCID: PMC2887939  PMID: 20490813
FTLD; FUS; FTLD-UPS; Frontotemporal; FTD
8.  Survival Profiles of Patients With Frontotemporal Dementia and Motor Neuron Disease 
Archives of neurology  2009;66(11):1359-1364.
Background
Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are neurodegenerative diseases associated with TAR DNA-binding protein 43– and ubiquitin-immunoreactive pathologic lesions.
Objective
To determine whether survival is influenced by symptom of onset in patients with frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Design, Setting, and Patients
Retrospective review of patients with both cognitive impairment and motor neuron disease consecutively evaluated at 4 academic medical centers in 2 countries.
Main Outcome Measures
Clinical phenotypes and survival patterns of patients.
Results
A total of 87 patients were identified, including 60 who developed cognitive symptoms first, 19 who developed motor symptoms first, and 8 who had simultaneous onset of cognitive and motor symptoms. Among the 59 deceased patients, we identified 2 distinct subgroups of patients according to survival. Long-term survivors had cognitive onset and delayed emergence of motor symptoms after a long monosymptomatic phase and had significantly longer survival than the typical survivors (mean, 67.5 months vs 28.2 months, respectively; P<.001). Typical survivors can have simultaneous or discrete onset of cognitive and motor symptoms, and the simultaneous-onset patients had shorter survival (mean, 19.2 months) than those with distinct cognitive or motor onset (mean, 28.6 months) (P=.005).
Conclusions
Distinct patterns of survival profiles exist in patients with frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease, and overall survival may depend on the relative timing of the emergence of secondary symptoms.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2009.253
PMCID: PMC2881327  PMID: 19901167
9.  FUS pathology defines the majority of tau- and TDP-43-negative frontotemporal lobar degeneration 
Acta Neuropathologica  2010;120(1):33-41.
Through an international consortium, we have collected 37 tau- and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-negative frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) cases, and present here the first comprehensive analysis of these cases in terms of neuropathology, genetics, demographics and clinical data. 92% (34/37) had fused in sarcoma (FUS) protein pathology, indicating that FTLD-FUS is an important FTLD subtype. This FTLD-FUS collection specifically focussed on aFTLD-U cases, one of three recently defined subtypes of FTLD-FUS. The aFTLD-U subtype of FTLD-FUS is characterised clinically by behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and has a particularly young age of onset with a mean of 41 years. Further, this subtype had a high prevalence of psychotic symptoms (36% of cases) and low prevalence of motor symptoms (3% of cases). We did not find FUS mutations in any aFTLD-U case. To date, the only subtype of cases reported to have ubiquitin-positive but tau-, TDP-43- and FUS-negative pathology, termed FTLD-UPS, is the result of charged multivesicular body protein 2B gene (CHMP2B) mutation. We identified three FTLD-UPS cases, which are negative for CHMP2B mutation, suggesting that the full complement of FTLD pathologies is yet to be elucidated.
doi:10.1007/s00401-010-0698-6
PMCID: PMC2887939  PMID: 20490813
FTLD; FUS; FTLD-UPS; Frontotemporal; FTD
10.  Frequency of ubiquitin and FUS-positive, TDP-43-negative frontotemporal lobar degeneration 
Journal of Neurology  2009;257(5):747-753.
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a clinically, genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disorder. Within FTLD with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U), a new pathological subtype named FTLD-FUS was recently found with fused in sarcoma (FUS) positive, TDP-43-negative inclusions, and striking atrophy of the caudate nucleus. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of FTLD-FUS in our pathological FTLD series, and to describe the clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of FTLD-FUS, especially caudate atrophy. Demographic and clinical data collected prospectively from 387 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) yielded 74 brain specimens. Immunostaining was carried out using a panel of antibodies, including AT-8, ubiquitin, p62, FUS, and TDP-43. Cortical and caudate atrophy on MRI (n = 136) was rated as normal, mild-moderate or severe. Of the 37 FTLD-U cases, 33 were reclassified as FTLD-TDP and four (0.11, 95%: 0.00–0.21) as FTLD-FUS, with ubiquitin and FUS-positive, p62 and TDP-43-negative neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NII). All four FTLD-FUS cases had a negative family history, behavioural variant FTD (bvFTD), and three had an age at onset ≤40 years. MRI revealed mild-moderate or severe caudate atrophy in all, with a mean duration from onset till MRI of 63 months (range 16–119 months). In our total clinical FTD cohort, we found 11 patients (0.03; 95% CI: 0.01–0.05) with bvFTD, negative family history, and age at onset ≤40 years. Caudate atrophy was present in 10 out of 136 MRIs, and included all four FUS-cases. The newly identified FTLD-FUS has a frequency of 11% in FTLD-U, and an estimated frequency of three percent in our clinical FTD cohort. The existence of this pathological subtype can be predicted with reasonable certainty by age at onset ≤40 years, negative family history, bvFTD and caudate atrophy on MRI.
doi:10.1007/s00415-009-5404-z
PMCID: PMC2864899  PMID: 19946779
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD); Ubiquitin; p62; TDP-43; FUS
11.  Variation at GRN 3′-UTR rs5848 Is Not Associated with a Risk of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration in Dutch Population 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(10):e7494.
Background
A single nucleotide polymorphism (rs5848) located in the 3′- untranslated region of GRN has recently been associated with a risk of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in North American population particularly in pathologically confirmed cases with neural inclusions immunoreactive for ubiquitin and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), but negative for tau and alpha-synuclein (FTLD-TDP).
Methodology/Principal Findings
In an effort to replicate these results in a different population, rs5848 was genotyped in 256 FTLD cases and 1695 controls from the Netherlands. Single SNP gender-adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed no significant association between variation at rs5848 and FTLD. Fisher's exact test, failed to find any significant association between rs5848 and a subset of 23 pathology confirmed FTLD-TDP cases.
Conclusions/Significance
The evidence presented here suggests that variation at rs5848 does not contribute to the etiology of FTLD in the Dutch population.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0007494
PMCID: PMC2761542  PMID: 19847305

Results 1-11 (11)