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author:("Hassan, nhar")
1.  Emerging Subspecialties in Neurology: Deep brain stimulation and electrical neuro-network modulation 
Neurology  2013;80(5):e47-e50.
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical therapy that involves the delivery of an electrical current to one or more brain targets. This technology has been rapidly expanding to address movement, neuropsychiatric, and other disorders. The evolution of DBS has created a niche for neurologists, both in the operating room and in the clinic. Since DBS is not always deep, not always brain, and not always simply stimulation, a more accurate term for this field may be electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM). Fellowships will likely in future years evolve their scope to include other technologies, and other nervous system regions beyond typical DBS therapy.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e31827f0f91
PMCID: PMC3590054  PMID: 23359377
2.  Neuropathological features of corticobasal degeneration presenting as corticobasal syndrome or Richardson syndrome 
Brain  2011;134(11):3264-3275.
Patients with corticobasal degeneration can present with several different clinical syndromes, making ante-mortem diagnosis a challenge. Corticobasal syndrome is the clinical phenotype originally described for corticobasal degeneration, characterized by asymmetric rigidity and apraxia, cortical sensory deficits, dystonia and myoclonus. Some patients do not develop these features, but instead have clinical features consistent with the Richardson syndrome presentation of progressive supranuclear palsy, characterized by postural instability, early unexplained falls, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, symmetric motor disability and dysphagia. The aim of this study was to identify differences in corticobasal degeneration presenting with corticobasal syndrome (n = 11) or Richardson syndrome (n = 15) with respect to demographic, clinical and neuropathological features. Corticobasal degeneration cases were also compared with patients with pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy with Richardson syndrome (n = 15). Cases with corticobasal degeneration, regardless of presentation, shared histopathological and tau biochemical characteristics, but they had differing densities of tau pathology in neuroanatomical regions that correlated with their clinical presentation. In particular, those with corticobasal syndrome had greater tau pathology in the primary motor and somatosensory cortices and putamen, while those with Richardson syndrome had greater tau pathology in limbic and hindbrain structures. Compared with progressive supranuclear palsy, patients with corticobasal degeneration and Richardson syndrome had less neuronal loss in the subthalamic nucleus, but more severe neuronal loss in the medial substantia nigra and greater atrophy of the anterior corpus callosum. Clinically, they had more cognitive impairment and frontal behavioural dysfunction. The results suggest that Richardson syndrome can be a clinicopathological presentation of corticobasal degeneration. Atrophy of anterior corpus callosum may be a potential neuroimaging marker to differentiate corticobasal degeneration from progressive supranuclear palsy in patients with Richardson syndrome.
doi:10.1093/brain/awr234
PMCID: PMC3212714  PMID: 21933807
pathology; immunocytochemistry; progressive supranuclear palsy; tau protein; corticobasal degeneration
3.  The corticobasal syndrome–Alzheimer’s disease conundrum 
Expert review of neurotherapeutics  2011;11(11):1569-1578.
Corticobasal syndrome (CBS), once thought to be pathognomonic for corticobasal degeneration pathology, is increasingly reported with various underlying pathologies. Alzheimer’s disease is one such pathology, also once believed to be unique for its clinical syndrome of dementia of the Alzheimer’s type. CBS is believed to result from topography of asymmetric parietofrontal cortical lesion involvement, rather than lesion subtype. However, this topographical pattern is strikingly different to that typically associated with AD for unclear reasons. This article will focus on CBS with underlying AD pathology (CBS-AD), and will review associated clinical, imaging and demographic factors. Predicting AD pathology is of marked interest as disease-modifying therapies loom on the horizon, with biomarkers and imaging research underway. By reviewing the literature for CBS-AD case reports and series and contrasting them with CBS with underlying corticobasal degeneration pathology cases, the article aims to examine factors that may predict AD pathology. How AD pathology may produce this clinical phenotype, rather than the prototype dementia of the Alzheimer’s type, will also be reviewed.
doi:10.1586/ern.11.153
PMCID: PMC3232678  PMID: 22014136
alien limb; Alzheimer’s disease; apraxia; corticobasal degeneration; corticobasal syndrome; dementia; myoclonus; rigidity; tau; voxel-based morphometry
4.  Symmetric corticobasal degeneration (S-CBD) 
Parkinsonism & related disorders  2009;16(3):208-214.
Background
Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized pathologically by neuronal loss, gliosis and tau deposition in neocortex, basal ganglia and brainstem. Typical clinical presentation is known as corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and involves the core features of progressive asymmetric rigidity and apraxia, accompanied by other signs of cortical and extrapyramidal dysfunction. Asymmetry is also emphasized on neuroimaging.
Objective
To describe a series of cases of CBD with symmetric clinical features and to compare clinical and imaging features of these symmetric CBD cases (S-CBD) to typical cases of CBS with CBD pathology.
Methods
All cases of pathologically confirmed CBD from the Mayo Clinic Rochester database were identified. Clinical records were reviewed and quantitative volumetric analysis of symmetric atrophy on head MRI using atlas based parcellation was performed. Subjects were classified as S-CBD if no differences had been observed between right- and left-sided cortical or extrapyramidal signs or symptoms. S-CBD cases were compared to 10 randomly selected typical CBS cases.
Results
Five cases (2 female) met criteria for S-CBD. None had limb dystonia, myoclonus, apraxia or alien limb phenomena. S-CBD cases had significantly less asymmetric atrophy when compared with CBS cases (p=0.009); they were also younger at onset (median 61 versus 66 years, p<0.05) and death (67 versus 73 years, p<0.05). Family history was present in 40% of S-CBD cases.
Conclusions
CBD can have a symmetric presentation, clinically and radiologically, in which typical features of CBS, such as limb apraxia, myoclonus, dystonia and alien limb phenomenon, may be absent.
doi:10.1016/j.parkreldis.2009.11.013
PMCID: PMC2941264  PMID: 20018548
Corticobasal degeneration; Corticobasal syndrome; Symmetric CBD; Atlas Based Parcellation; Pathology

Results 1-4 (4)