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1.  Higher risk of progression to dementia in mild cognitive impairment cases who revert to normal 
Neurology  2014;82(4):317-325.
Objective:
To estimate rates of progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and of reversion from MCI to being cognitively normal (CN) in a population-based cohort.
Methods:
Participants (n = 534, aged 70 years and older) enrolled in the prospective Mayo Clinic Study of Aging were evaluated at baseline and every 15 months to identify incident MCI or dementia.
Results:
Over a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 153 of 534 participants (28.7%) with prevalent or incident MCI progressed to dementia (71.3 per 1,000 person-years). The cumulative incidence of dementia was 5.4% at 1 year, 16.1% at 2, 23.4% at 3, 31.1% at 4, and 42.5% at 5 years. The risk of dementia was elevated in MCI cases (hazard ratio [HR] 23.2, p < 0.001) compared with CN subjects. Thirty-eight percent (n = 201) of MCI participants reverted to CN (175.0/1,000 person-years), but 65% subsequently developed MCI or dementia; the HR was 6.6 (p < 0.001) compared with CN subjects. The risk of reversion was reduced in subjects with an APOE ε4 allele (HR 0.53, p < 0.001), higher Clinical Dementia Rating Scale–Sum of Boxes (HR 0.56, p < 0.001), and poorer cognitive function (HR 0.56, p < 0.001). The risk was also reduced in subjects with amnestic MCI (HR 0.70, p = 0.02) and multidomain MCI (HR 0.61, p = 0.003).
Conclusions:
MCI cases, including those who revert to CN, have a high risk of progressing to dementia. This suggests that diagnosis of MCI at any time has prognostic value.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0000000000000055
PMCID: PMC3929198  PMID: 24353333
2.  Caloric Intake, Aging, and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Population-Based Study 
In a population-based case-control study, we examined whether moderate and high caloric intakes are differentially associated with the odds of having mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The sample was derived from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Non-demented study participants aged 70–92 years (1,072 cognitively normal persons and 161 subjects with MCI) reported their caloric consumption within 1 year of the date of interview by completing a Food Frequency Questionnaire. An expert consensus panel classified each subject as either cognitively normal or having MCI based on published criteria. We conducted multivariable logistic regression analyses to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) after adjusting for age, sex, education, depression, medical comorbidity, and body mass index. We also conducted stratified analyses by apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype status. Analyses were conducted in tertiles of caloric intake: 600 to <1,526 kcals per day (reference group); 1,526 to 2,143 kcals per day (moderate caloric intake group); and >2,143 kcals per day (high caloric intake group). In the primary analysis, there was no significant difference between the moderate caloric intake group and the reference group (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.53–1.42, p = 0.57). However, high caloric intake was associated with a nearly two-fold increased odds of having MCI (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.26–3.06, p = 0.003) as compared to the reference group. Therefore, high caloric intake was associated with MCI but not moderate caloric intake. This association is not necessarily a cause-effect relationship.
doi:10.3233/JAD-121270
PMCID: PMC3578975  PMID: 23234878
aging; APOE ε4 genotype; caloric intake; mild cognitive impairment; population-based
3.  Probable REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Increases Risk for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Parkinson’s Disease: A Population-Based Study 
Annals of Neurology  2012;71(1):49-56.
Objective
REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is associated with neurodegenerative disease and particularly with the synucleinopathies. Convenience samples involving subjects with idiopathic RBD have suggested an increased risk of incident mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia (usually dementia with Lewy bodies) or Parkinson’s disease (PD). There is no data on such risk in a population-based sample.
Methods
Cognitively normal subjects aged 70–89 in a population-based study of aging who screened positive for probable RBD using the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire were followed at 15 month intervals. In a Cox Proportional Hazards Model, we measured the risk of developing MCI, dementia, PD among the exposed (pRBD+) and unexposed (pRBD−) cohorts.
Results
Forty-four subjects with pRBD+ at enrollment (median duration of pRBD features was 7.5 years), and 607 pRBD− subjects, were followed prospectively for a median of 3.8 years. Fourteen of the pRBD+ subjects developed MCI and one developed PD (15/44=34% developed MCI / PD); none developed dementia. After adjustment for age, sex, education, and medical comorbidity, pRBD+ subjects were at increased risk of MCI / PD [Hazard Ratio (HR) 2.2, 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) 1.3 – 3.9; p=0.005]. Inclusion of subjects who withdrew from the study produced similar results, as did exclusion of subjects with medication-associated RBD. Duration of pRBD symptoms did not predict the development of MCI / PD (HR 1.05 per 10 years, 95%CI 0.84 – 1.3; p=0.68).
Interpretation
In this population-based cohort study, we observed that pRBD confers a 2.2-fold increased risk of developing MCI / PD over four years.
doi:10.1002/ana.22655
PMCID: PMC3270692  PMID: 22275251
sleep disorders; parasomnias; dementia; Alzheimer’s disease; dementia with Lewy bodies; parkinsonism; synuclein
4.  Computer Activities, Physical Exercise, Aging, and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Population-Based Study 
Mayo Clinic Proceedings  2012;87(5):437-442.
Objective
To examine the association between computer use, physical exercise, aging, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
Patients and Methods
The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging is a population-based study of aging and MCI in Olmsted County, Minnesota. The study sample consists of a random sample of 926 nondemented individuals aged 70 to 93 years who completed self-reported questionnaires on physical exercise, computer use, and caloric intake within 1 year of the date of interview. The study was conducted from April 1, 2006, through November 30, 2008. An expert consensus panel classified each study participant as cognitively normal or having MCI on the basis of published criteria.
Results
Using a multivariable logistic regression model, we examined the impact of the presence during the study period of 2 lifestyle factors (physical exercise and computer use) after adjusting for a third lifestyle factor (caloric intake) on aging and MCI. We also adjusted for age, sex, education, medical comorbidity, and depression. The median daily caloric intake was significantly higher in participants with MCI than in controls (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.06; P=.001). Participants who engaged in both moderate physical exercise and computer use had significantly decreased odds of having MCI (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.36 [0.20-0.68]) compared with the reference group. In the interaction analyses, there was an additive interaction (P=.012) but not multiplicative interaction (P=.780).
Conclusion
In this population-based sample, the presence of both physical exercise and computer use as assessed via survey was associated with decreased odds of having MCI, after adjustment for caloric intake and traditional confounders.
doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2011.12.020
PMCID: PMC3538471  PMID: 22560523
CDR, Clinical Dementia Rating; CI, confidence interval; MCI, mild cognitive impairment; OR, odds ratio
5.  Engaging in Cognitive Activities, Aging and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Population-Based Study 
We investigated whether engaging in cognitive activities is associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a cross-sectional study derived from an ongoing population-based study of normal cognitive aging and MCI in Olmsted County, Minnesota. A random sample of 1321 non-demented study participants ages 70 to 89 (n = 1124 cognitively normal persons and n = 197 subjects with MCI) was interviewed about the frequency of cognitive activities carried out in late life (within one year of the date of interview). Computer activities [OR (95% CI) = 0.50 (0.36, 0.71); p < .0001)], craft activities such as knitting, quilting, etc. [0.66 (0.47, 0.93); p = 0.019)], playing games [0.65 (0.47, 0.90); p = 0.010)], and reading books [0.67 (0.49, 0.94); p = 0.019)] were associated with decreased odds of having MCI. Social activities such as traveling were marginally significant [0.71 (0.51, 1.00); p = 0.050)]. Even though the point estimates for reading magazines, playing music, artistic activities, and group activities were associated with reduced odds of having MCI, none reached statistical significance. We could not expect to observe any difference between the two groups on the variable of reading newspapers since almost identical proportions of the two groups (97.4% of normals and 97.5% of the MCI group) were engaged in reading newspapers on a regular basis.
doi:10.1176/appi.neuropsych.23.2.149
PMCID: PMC3204924  PMID: 21677242
cognitive activities; aging; mild cognitive impairment
6.  Incidence and Predictors of Myocardial Infarction after Transient Ischemic Attack: A Population-Based Study 
Background
Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death after transient ischemic attack (TIA). Reliable estimates of the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) after TIA, however, are lacking.
Purpose
To determine the incidence of and risk factors for MI after TIA
Methods
We cross-referenced pre-existing incidence cohorts from the Rochester Epidemiology Project for TIA (1985–1994) and MI (1979–2006) to identify all community residents with incident MI after incident TIA. Incidence of MI after TIA was determined using Kaplan-Meier life-table methods. This was compared to the age-, sex-, and period-specific MI incidence in the general population. Proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine associations between clinical variables and the occurrence of MI after TIA.
Results
Average annual incidence of MI after TIA was 0.95%. Relative risk for incident MI in the TIA cohort compared to the general population was 2.09 (95% CI 1.52–2.81). This was highest in patients under 60 years old (relative risk 15.1; 95% CI 4.11–38.6). Increasing age (HR 1.51 per 10 years, 95% CI 1.14–2.01), male sex (HR 2.19, 95% CI 1.18–4.06), and the use of lipid lowering therapy at the time of TIA (HR 3.10, 95% CI 1.20–8.00) were independent risk factors for MI after TIA.
Conclusions
Average annual incidence of MI after TIA is approximately 1%, about double that of the general population. The relative risk increase is especially high in patients under 60 years old. These data are useful for identifying subgroups of patients with TIA at highest risk for subsequent MI.
doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.593723
PMCID: PMC3238912  PMID: 21441159
Transient Ischemic Attack; Myocardial Infarction; Incidence; Risk Factors; Mortality
7.  Vegetables, Unsaturated Fats, Moderate Alcohol Intake, and Mild Cognitive Impairment 
Background/Aims
To investigate associations of the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) components and the MeDi score with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
Methods
Participants (aged 70–89 years) were clinically evaluated to assess MCI and dementia, and completed a 128-item food frequency questionnaire.
Results
163 of 1,233 nondemented persons had MCI. The odds ratio of MCI was reduced for high vegetable intake [0.66 (95% CI = 0.44–0.99), p = 0.05] and for high mono-plus polyunsaturated fatty acid to saturated fatty acid ratio [0.52 (95% CI = 0.33–0.81), p = 0.007], adjusted for confounders. The risk of incident MCI or dementia was reduced in subjects with a high MeDi score [hazard ratio = 0.75 (95% CI = 0.46–1.21), p = 0.24].
Conclusion
Vegetables, unsaturated fats, and a high MeDi score may be beneficial to cognitive function.
doi:10.1159/000305099
PMCID: PMC2889256  PMID: 20502015
Mild cognitive impairment; Dietary intake; Moderate alcohol intake; Unsaturated fatty acids; Mediterranean diet; Longitudinal; Prevalence studies; Incidence studies; Population-based
8.  Incidence of Noncardiac Vascular Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Relationship to Extraarticular Disease Manifestations 
Arthritis and rheumatism  2006;54(2):642-648.
Objective
To investigate the incidence of noncardiac vascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its relationship to systemic extraarticular disease in a community-based cohort.
Methods
A retrospective medical record review of 609 patients with incident RA diagnosed during 1955–1994 was carried out in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Patients were followed up from 1955 to 2000 (median followup 11.8 years). Incident noncardiac vascular disease and severe extraarticular RA manifestations (including pericarditis, pleuritis, and vasculitis) were recorded according to predefined criteria, and incidence rates were estimated. Using Cox proportional hazards models, the risk (hazard ratio [HR]) of developing vascular events was assessed in patients with and without severe extraarticular RA.
Results
Cerebrovascular and peripheral arterial events occurred in 139 patients (22.8%). The 30-year cumulative incidence rates of peripheral arterial events, cerebrovascular events, and venous thromboembolic events were estimated to be 19.6%, 21.6%, and 7.2%, respectively. The presence of severe extraarticular RA manifestations was found to be associated with all subgroups of noncardiac vascular disease except cerebrovascular disease alone (HR 2.3, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.2–4.3 for peripheral arterial events; HR 3.7, 95% CI 1.3–10.3 for venous thromboembolic events; HR 1.5, 95% CI 0.7–3.2 for cerebrovascular events) after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and rheumatoid factor status.
Conclusion
This is the first study to assess the incidence of noncardiac vascular disease in RA. Severe extraarticular RA was associated with all forms of noncardiac vascular disease except cerebrovascular disease alone. Similar to cardiac disease, the excess risk of noncardiac vascular disease in RA is likely to be related, in part, to the systemic inflammation associated with the extraarticular manifestations of RA.
doi:10.1002/art.21628
PMCID: PMC3063096  PMID: 16447212
9.  Validation of the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status-modified in Subjects with Normal Cognition, Mild Cognitive Impairment, or Dementia 
Neuroepidemiology  2009;34(1):34-42.
Background
The telephone assessment of cognitive functions may reduce the cost and burden of epidemiological studies.
Methods
We validated the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status-modified (TICS-m) using an extensive in-person assessment as the standard for comparison. Clinical diagnoses of normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or dementia were established by consensus of physician, nurse, and neuropsychological assessments.
Results
The extensive in-person assessment classified 83 persons with normal cognition, 42 persons with MCI, and 42 persons with dementia. There was considerable overlap in TICS-m scores among the three groups. Receiver operating characteristic curves identified ≤31 as the optimal cutoff score to separate subjects with MCI from subjects with normal cognition (sensitivity = 71.4%; subjects with dementia excluded), and ≤27 to separate subjects with dementia from subjects with MCI (sensitivity = 69.0%; subjects with normal cognition excluded). The TICS-m performed well when subjects with MCI were pooled either with subjects with dementia (sensitivity = 83.3%) or with subjects with normal cognition (sensitivity = 83.3%).
Conclusions
Although the TICS-m performed well when using a dichotomous classification of cognitive status, it performed only fairly in separating MCI from either normal cognition or dementia. The TICS-m should not be used as a free-standing tool to identify subjects with MCI, and it should be used with caution as a tool to detect dementia.
doi:10.1159/000255464
PMCID: PMC2857622  PMID: 19893327
Dementia; Mild cognitive impairment; Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status-modified
10.  Physical Exercise and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Population-Based Study 
Archives of neurology  2010;67(1):80-86.
Objective
Physical exercise was found to be associated with a decreased risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease. We investigated whether physical exercise is also associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
Design
Population-based case-control study.
Setting
The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, an ongoing population-based cohort study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA.
Participants
1324 non-demented subjects who completed a questionnaire on physical exercise.
Main Outcome Measures
An expert consensus panel classified each subject as either cognitively normal or affected by MCI using information from a Clinical Dementia Rating Scale administered to the subject and to an informant, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing to assess 4 cognitive domains.
Results
We compared the frequency of physical exercise in 198 subjects with MCI to the frequency in 1126 cognitively normal subjects and adjusted analyses for age, sex, years of education, medical comorbidity, and depression. The odds ratio (OR) for any frequency of moderate-intensity exercise was 0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43–0.88; P=.008) for exercise in midlife (aged 50–65 years), and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.49–0.93; P=.02) for exercise in late life. The findings were consistent in men and women. Light exercise and vigorous exercise were not significantly associated with MCI.
Conclusions
In this population-based case-control study, any frequency of moderate-intensity exercise carried out in either midlife or late life was associated with a reduced OR of MCI.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2009.297
PMCID: PMC2919839  PMID: 20065133
11.  Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Reduced Odds of MCI: The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging 
Mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, PUFA) have been associated with a reduced risk of dementia. The association of these fatty acids with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is not fully established. The objective of the study was to investigate the cross-sectional association of dietary fatty acids with MCI in a population-based sample. Participants aged ≥ 70 years on October 1, 2004, were evaluated using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (participant and informant), a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. A panel of nurses, physicians, and neuropsychologists reviewed the data for each participant in order to establish a diagnosis of MCI, normal cognition, or dementia by consensus. Participants also completed a 128-item food-frequency questionnaire. Among 1,233 non-demented subjects, 163 (13.2%) had MCI. The odds ratio (OR) of MCI decreased with increasing PUFA and MUFA intake. Compared to the lowest tertile, the OR (95% confidence interval) for the upper tertiles were 0.44 (0.29–0.66; p for trend = 0.0004) for total PUFA; 0.44 (0.30–0.67; p for trend = 0.0004) for omega-6 fatty acids; 0.62 (0.42–0.91; p for trend = 0.012) for omega-3 fatty acids; and 0.56 (0.38–0.83; p for trend = 0.01) for (MUFA+PUFA):saturated fatty acid ratio after adjustment for age, sex, number of years of education, and caloric intake. In this study, higher intake of PUFA and MUFA was associated with a reduced likelihood of MCI among elderly persons in the population-based setting.
doi:10.3233/JAD-2010-091597
PMCID: PMC2940991  PMID: 20634591
Cross-sectional studies; dietary fats; polyunsaturated fatty acids; monounsaturated fatty acids; population-based; mild cognitive impairment
12.  Association of C-reactive protein with mild cognitive impairment 
Background
Inflammation is suggested to play a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, and may also be involved in the pathogenesis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study examined the association of inflammatory markers in serum or plasma with prevalent MCI and MCI subtypes in a population-based sample.
Methods
Olmsted County, MN, residents aged 70–89 years on October 1, 2004, were evaluated using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. Information ascertained for each participant was reviewed by an expert panel of neuropsychologists, physicians, and nurses, and a diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα), and adiponectin were measured at baseline.
Results
Among 313 subjects with MCI and 1,570 cognitively normal subjects, a CRP level in the upper quartile (> 3.3 mg/L) was significantly associated with MCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–2.01) and with non-amnestic MCI (na-MCI; OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.12–3.78) after adjusting for age, sex, and years of education. However, there was no association with amnestic MCI (a-MCI; OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.81–1.82). No association was observed with the other inflammatory markers.
Conclusions
Plasma CRP is associated with prevalent MCI and with na-MCI in elderly, non-demented persons in the population-based setting. These findings suggest an involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of MCI.
doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2009.01.025
PMCID: PMC2851170  PMID: 19751919
C-reactive protein; Interleukin 6; Adiponectin; Inflammation; Cytokines; Mild cognitive impairment; Cross-sectional; Population-based
13.  The Prevalence of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Normal Cognitive Aging: A Population-Based Study 
Archives of general psychiatry  2008;65(10):1193-1198.
Context
Little is known about the population-based prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
Objective
To estimate the prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in MCI and normal cognitive aging in a defined population.
Design
Cross-sectional study derived from an ongoing population-based prospective cohort study.
Setting
The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging.
Participants
We studied a random sample of 1969 non-demented participants out of the target population of 9965 elderly persons residing in Olmsted County on the prevalence date (October 1, 2004). Neuropsychiatric data were available on 319 of the 329 MCI subjects (97.0%) and on 1590 of the 1640 cognitively normal subjects (97.0%).
Method
Neurological, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric data were gathered from the study participants. A classification of normal cognitive aging, MCI, and dementia was adjudicated by an expert consensus panel. Accordingly, 329 subjects were classified as having MCI and the remaining 1640 subjects were classified as cognitively normal.
Main Outcome Measure
The Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI-Q).
Results
Multi-variable logistic regression analyses were conducted, after adjusting for age, sex, and education. By taking into consideration both the odds ratio and the frequency of a symptom, the most distinguishing features between the 2 groups were apathy (odds ratio [OR], 4.53; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.11–6.60; P<.001), agitation (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.18–5.92; P<.001), anxiety (OR, 3.00; 95% CI, 2.01–4.48; P<.001), irritability (OR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.11–4.22; P<.001), and depression (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 2.06–3.76; P<.001). Delusion had the highest OR (8.12; 95% CI, 2.92–22.60; P<.001); however, it was rare in both cognitively normal subjects (6/1590=0.4%) and MCI (11/319=3.4%). Thus, the population attributable risk for delusion was only 2.62% as compared to 14.60% for apathy.
Conclusions
Non-psychotic symptoms affected approximately 50% of subjects with MCI and 25% of cognitively normal subjects. By contrast, psychotic symptoms were rare.
doi:10.1001/archpsyc.65.10.1193
PMCID: PMC2575648  PMID: 18838636
14.  Folate receptor alpha as a tumor target in epithelial ovarian cancer 
Gynecologic oncology  2008;108(3):619-626.
Objectives
Folate receptor α (FRα) is a folate-binding protein overexpressed on ovarian and several other epithelial malignancies that can be used as a target for imaging and therapeutic strategies. The goal of this study is to improve historical data that lack specific information about FRα expression in rare histological subtypes, primary disease versus metastatic foci, and recurrent disease.
Methods
FRα expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on 186 primary and 27 recurrent ovarian tumors, including 24 pairs of samples obtained from the same individuals at diagnosis and at secondary debulking surgery. For 20 of the 186 primaries, simultaneous metastatic foci were also analyzed. FRα staining was analyzed in light of disease morphology, stage, grade, debulking status, and time from diagnosis to recurrence and death.
Results
FRα expression was apparent in 134 of 186 (72%) primary and 22 of 27 (81.5%) recurrent ovarian tumors. In 21 of 24 (87.5%) matched specimens, recurrent tumors reflected the FRα status detected at diagnosis. Metastatic foci were similar to primary tumors in FRα staining. FRα status was not associated with time to recurrence or overall survival in either univariate or multivariable analyses.
Conclusion
FRα expression occurs frequently, especially in the common high-grade, high-stage serous tumors that are most likely to recur. New findings from this study show that FRα expression is maintained on metastatic foci and recurrent tumors, suggesting that novel folate-targeted therapies may hold promise for the majority of women with either newly diagnosed or recurrent ovarian cancer.
doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2007.11.020
PMCID: PMC2707764  PMID: 18222534
Folate receptor; Ovarian cancer

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