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1.  Hypermethylation of repeat expanded C9orf72 is a clinical and molecular disease modifier 
Acta neuropathologica  2014;129(1):39-52.
C9orf72 promoter hypermethylation inhibits the accumulation of pathologies which have been postulated to be neurotoxic. We tested here whether C9orf72 hypermethylation is associated with prolonged disease in C9orf72 mutation carriers. C9orf72 methylation was quantified from brain or blood using methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme digest-qPCR in a cross-sectional cohort of 118 C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers and 19 non-carrier family members. Multivariate regression models were used to determine whether C9orf72 hypermethylation was associated with age at onset, disease duration, age at death, or hexanucleotide repeat expansion size. Permutation analysis was performed to determine whether C9orf72 methylation is heritable. We observed a high correlation between C9orf72 methylation across tissues including cerebellum, frontal cortex, spinal cord and peripheral blood. While C9orf72 methylation was not significantly different between ALS and FTD and did not predict age at onset, brain and blood C9orf72 hypermethylation was associated with later age at death in FTD (brain: β = 0.18, p = 0.006; blood: β = 0.15, p < 0.001), and blood C9orf72 hypermethylation was associated with longer disease duration in FTD (β = 0.03, p = 0.007). Furthermore, C9orf72 hypermethylation was associated with smaller hexanucleotide repeat length (β = −16.69, p = 0.033). Finally, analysis of pedigrees with multiple mutation carriers demonstrated a significant association between C9orf72 methylation and family relatedness (p < 0.0001). C9orf72 hypermethylation is associated with prolonged disease in C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers with FTD. The attenuated clinical phenotype associated with C9orf72 hypermethylation suggests that slower clinical progression in FTD is associated with reduced expression of mutant C9orf72. These results support the hypothesis that expression of the hexanucleotide repeat expansion is associated with a toxic gain of function.
doi:10.1007/s00401-014-1365-0
PMCID: PMC4282973  PMID: 25388784
Neurodegeneration; Frontotemporal lobar degeneration; Frontotemporal dementia; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Epigenetics
2.  Specific changes of sulfatide levels in individuals with preclinical Alzheimer’s disease: an early event in disease pathogenesis 
Journal of neurochemistry  2013;127(6):10.1111/jnc.12368.
To explore the hypothesis that alterations in cellular membrane lipids are present at the stage of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (i.e., cognitively normal at death, but with AD neuropathology), we performed targeted shotgun lipidomics of lipid extracts from postmortem brains of subjects with preclinical AD. We found sulfatide levels were significantly lower in subjects with preclinical AD compared to those without AD neuropathology. We also found that the level of ethanolamine glycerophospholipid was marginally lower at this stage of AD, whereas changes of the ceramide levels were undetectable with the available samples. These results indicate that cellular membrane defects are present at the earliest stages of AD pathogenesis and also suggest that sulfatide loss is among the earliest events of AD development, while alterations in the levels of ethanolamine glycerophospholipid and ceramide occur relatively later in disease.
doi:10.1111/jnc.12368
PMCID: PMC3844035  PMID: 23865640
Ceramide; membrane lipids; plasmalogen; preclinical Alzheimer’s disease; shotgun lipidomics; sulfatide
3.  Functional Connectivity in Autosomal Dominant and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease 
JAMA neurology  2014;71(9):1111-1122.
Importance
Autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) is caused by rare genetic mutations in three specific genes, in contrast to late-onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD), which has a more polygenetic risk profile.
Design, Setting, and Participants
We analyzed functional connectivity in multiple brain resting state networks (RSNs) in a cross-sectional cohort of ADAD (N=79) and LOAD (N=444) human participants using resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) at multiple international academic sites.
Main Outcomes and Measures
For both types of AD, we quantified and compared functional connectivity changes in RSNs as a function of dementia severity as measured by clinical dementia rating (CDR). In ADAD, we qualitatively investigated functional connectivity changes with respect to estimated years from onset of symptoms within five RSNs.
Results
Functional connectivity decreases with increasing CDR were similar for both LOAD and ADAD in multiple RSNs. Ordinal logistic regression models constructed in each type of AD accurately predicted CDR stage in the other, further demonstrating similarity of functional connectivity loss in each disease type. Among ADAD participants, functional connectivity in multiple RSNs appeared qualitatively lower in asymptomatic mutation carriers near their anticipated age of symptom onset compared to asymptomatic mutation non-carriers.
Conclusions and Relevance
rs-fcMRI changes with progressing AD severity are similar between ADAD and LOAD. Rs-fcMRI may be a useful endpoint for LOAD and ADAD therapy trials. ADAD disease process may be an effective model for LOAD disease process.
doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.1654
PMCID: PMC4240274  PMID: 25069482
Resting-state functional connectivity; autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease; late-onset Alzheimer's disease; default mode network; apolipoprotein E (APOE)
4.  Regulation of dopamine D3 receptor in the striatal regions and substantia nigra in diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD) 
Neuroscience  2013;0:112-126.
The regulation of D3 receptor has not been well documented in diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD). In this study, a novel D3 preferring radioligand [3H]WC-10 and a D2-preferring radioligand [3H]raclopride were used and the absolute densities of the dopamine D3 and D2 receptors were determined in the striatal regions and substantia nigra (SN) from postmortem brains from 5 cases DLBD, which included dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, n=4) and Parkinson disease dementia (PDD, n=1). The densities of the dopamine D1 receptor, vesicular monoamine transporter 2(VMAT2), and dopamine transporter (DAT) were also measured by quantitative autoradiography using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. The densities of these dopaminergic markers were also measured in the same brain regions in 10 age-matched control cases. Dopamine D3 receptor density was significantly increased in the striatal regions including caudate, putamen and nucleus accumbens (NAc). There were no significant changes in the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor densities in any brain regions measured. VMAT2 and DAT densities were reduced in all the brain regions measured in DLB/PDD, however the significant reduction was found in putamen for DAT and in the NAc and SN for VMAT2. The decrease of dopamine pre-synaptic markers implies neuronal loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) in these DLB/PDD cases, while the increase of D3 receptors in striatal regions could be attributed to dopaminergic medication history and psychiatric state such as hallucinations. Whether it also reflects compensatory regulation upon dopaminergic denervation warrants further confirmations on larger populations.
doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.05.048
PMCID: PMC3796121  PMID: 23732230
5.  Preclinical Alzheimer’s disease and its outcome: a longitudinal cohort study 
Lancet neurology  2013;12(10):957-965.
Background
New research criteria for preclinical Alzheimer’s disease (AD)have been proposed by the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer’s Association. They include stages for cognitively normal individuals with abnormal amyloid markers (stage 1), abnormal amyloid and injury markers (stage 2) and abnormal amyloid and injury markers and subtle cognitive changes (stage 3). We investigated the occurrence and long-term outcome of these stages.
Methods
Cerebrospinal fluidamyloid-β1–42 and tau levels and a memory composite score were used to classify 311 cognitively normal(Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR]=0) research participants ≥65 years as normal (both markers normal), preclinical AD stage 1–3, or Suspected Non-Alzheimer Pathophysiology (SNAP, abnormal injury marker without abnormal amyloid marker). Outcome measures were progression to CDR≥0·5 symptomatic AD and mortality up to 15 years after baseline (average=4 years).
Findings
129 (41·5%) of participants were normal, 47 (15%)were in stage 1, 36 (12%) in stage 2, 13 (4%)in stage 3, 72 (23%) had SNAP, and 14 (4·5%) remained unclassified. The proportion of preclinical AD (stage 1–3) in our cohort was higher in individuals older than 72 years and in APOE-ε4 carriers. The 5-year progression rate to CDR≥0·5 symptomatic AD was 2% for normal participants, 11% for stage 1, 26% for stage 2, 56% for stage 3, and 5% for SNAP. Compared with normal individuals, participants with preclinical AD had an increased risk of death (HR=6·2, p=0·0396).
Interpretation
Preclinical AD is common in cognitively normal elderly and strongly associated with future cognitive decline and mortality. Preclinical AD thus should be an important target for therapeutic interventions.
doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(13)70194-7
PMCID: PMC3904678  PMID: 24012374
6.  Genetic Heterogeneity in Alzheimer Disease and Implications for Treatment Strategies 
Since the original publication describing the illness in 1907, the genetic understanding of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has advanced such that it is now clear that it is a genetically heterogeneous condition, the subtypes of which may not uniformly respond to a given intervention. It is therefore critical to characterize the clinical and preclinical stages of AD subtypes, including the rare autosomal dominant forms caused by known mutations in the PSEN1, APP, and PSEN2 genes that are being studied in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network study and its associated secondary prevention trial. Similar efforts are occurring in an extended Colombian family with a PSEN1 mutation, in APOE ε4 homozygotes, and in Down syndrome. Despite commonalities in the mechanisms producing the AD phenotype, there are also differences that reflect specific genetic origins. Treatment modalities should be chosen and trials designed with these differences in mind. Ideally, the varying pathological cascades involved in the different subtypes of AD should be defined so that both areas of overlap and of distinct differences can be taken into account. At the very least, clinical trials should determine the influence of known genetic factors in post hoc analyses.
doi:10.1007/s11910-014-0499-8
PMCID: PMC4162987  PMID: 25217249
Alzheimer’s disease; Genetic; Heterogeneity; Presenilin; Amyloid precursor protein; Apolipoprotein E
7.  The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception 
The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic, and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study aimed to enroll 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with early AD, and 200 normal control subjects; $67 million funding was provided by both the public and private sectors, including the National Institute on Aging, 13 pharmaceutical companies, and 2 foundations that provided support through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results as of February 2011. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been as follows: (1) the development of standardized methods for clinical tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multicenter setting; (2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control subjects, MCI patients, and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β-amyloid cascade (Hardy, J Alzheimers Dis 2006;9(Suppl 3):151–3) and tau-mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD, whereas brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; (3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers combine optimum features from multiple modalities, including MRI, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, CSF biomarkers, and clinical tests; (4) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers, β-amyloid 42 and tau, as well as amyloid PET may reflect the earliest steps in AD pathology in mildly symptomatic or even nonsymptomatic subjects, and are leading candidates for the detection of AD in its preclinical stages; (5) the improvement of clinical trial efficiency through the identification of subjects most likely to undergo imminent future clinical decline and the use of more sensitive outcome measures to reduce sample sizes. Baseline cognitive and/or MRI measures generally predicted future decline better than other modalities, whereas MRI measures of change were shown to be the most efficient outcome measures; (6) the confirmation of the AD risk loci CLU, CR1, and PICALM and the identification of novel candidate risk loci; (7) worldwide impact through the establishment of ADNI-like programs in Europe, Asia, and Australia; (8) understanding the biology and pathobiology of normal aging, MCI, and AD through integration of ADNI biomarker data with clinical data from ADNI to stimulate research that will resolve controversies about competing hypotheses on the etiopathogenesis of AD, thereby advancing efforts to find disease-modifying drugs for AD; and (9) the establishment of infrastructure to allow sharing of all raw and processed data without embargo to interested scientific investigators throughout the world. The ADNI study was extended by a 2-year Grand Opportunities grant in 2009 and a renewal of ADNI (ADNI-2) in October 2010 through to 2016, with enrollment of an additional 550 participants.
doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2013.05.1769
PMCID: PMC4108198  PMID: 23932184
Alzheimer's disease; Mild cognitive impairment; Amyloid; Tau; Biomarker
8.  Principal component analysis of PiB distribution in Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases 
Neurology  2013;81(6):520-527.
Objective:
To use principal component analyses (PCA) of Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging to determine whether the pattern of in vivo β-amyloid (Aβ) in Parkinson disease (PD) with cognitive impairment is similar to the pattern found in symptomatic Alzheimer disease (AD).
Methods:
PiB PET scans were obtained from participants with PD with cognitive impairment (n = 53), participants with symptomatic AD (n = 35), and age-matched controls (n = 67). All were assessed using the Clinical Dementia Rating and APOE genotype was determined in 137 participants. PCA was used to 1) determine the PiB binding pattern in AD, 2) determine a possible unique PD pattern, and 3) directly compare the PiB binding patterns in PD and AD groups.
Results:
The first 2 principal components (PC1 and PC2) significantly separated the AD and control participants (p < 0.001). Participants with PD with cognitive impairment also were significantly different from participants with symptomatic AD on both components (p < 0.001). However, there was no difference between PD and controls on either component. Even those participants with PD with elevated mean cortical binding potentials were significantly different from participants with AD on both components.
Conclusion:
Using PCA, we demonstrated that participants with PD with cognitive impairment do not exhibit the same PiB binding pattern as participants with AD. These data suggest that Aβ deposition may play a different pathophysiologic role in the cognitive impairment of PD compared to that in AD.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e31829e6f94
PMCID: PMC3775684  PMID: 23825179
9.  Autopsy consent, brain collection, and standardized neuropathologic assessment of ADNI participants: The essential role of the Neuropathology Core 
Background
Our objectives are to facilitate autopsy consent, brain collection, and perform standardized neuropathologic assessments of all Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) participants who come to autopsy at the 58 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada.
Methods
Building on the expertise and resources of the existing Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, a Neuropathology Core (NPC) to serve ADNI was established with one new highly motivated research coordinator. The ADNI-NPC coordinator provides training materials and protocols to assist clinicians at ADNI sites in obtaining voluntary consent for brain autopsy in ADNI participants. Secondly, the ADNI-NPC maintains a central laboratory to provide uniform neuropathologic assessments using the operational criteria for the classification of AD and other pathologies defined by the National Alzheimer Coordinating Center (NACC). Thirdly, the ADNI-NPC maintains a state-of-the-art brain bank of ADNI-derived brain tissue to promote biomarker and multi-disciplinary clinicopathologic studies.
Results
During the initial year of funding of the ADNI Neuropathology Core, there was notable improvement in the autopsy rate to 44.4%. In the most recent year of funding (September 1st, 2008 to August 31st 2009), our autopsy rate improved to 71.5%. Although the overall numbers to date are small, these data demonstrate that the Neuropathology Core has established the administrative organization with the participating sites to harvest brains from ADNI participants who come to autopsy.
Conclusions
Within two years of operation, the Neuropathology Core has: (1) implemented a protocol to solicit permission for brain autopsy in ADNI participants at all 58 sites who die and (2) to send appropriate brain tissue from the decedents to the Neuropathology Core for a standardized, uniform, and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. Prior to the establishment of the NPC in September 2007, there were 6 deaths but no autopsies in ADNI participants. Subsequent to the establishment of the Core there have been 17 deaths of ADNI participants and 10 autopsies. Hence, the autopsy rate has gone from 0% to 59%. The third major accomplishment is the detection of co-existent pathologies with AD in the autopsied cases. It is possible that these co-morbidities may contribute to any variance in ADNI data.
doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2010.03.012
PMCID: PMC2893399  PMID: 20451876
Alzheimer's disease; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative; autopsy consent; brain bank; neuropathologic diagnostic criteria
10.  Comparison of symptomatic and asymptomatic persons with Alzheimer disease neuropathology 
Neurology  2013;80(23):2121-2129.
Objectives:
We sought to identify demographic and clinical features that were associated with expression of symptoms in the presence of Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathologic changes.
Methods:
We studied 82 asymptomatic (Clinical Dementia Rating global score = 0) and 824 symptomatic subjects (Clinical Dementia Rating score >0) with low to high AD neuropathologic changes at autopsy who were assessed at 1 of 34 National Institute on Aging–funded Alzheimer’s Disease Centers. All subjects underwent a clinical examination within 1 year of death. Logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with the odds of being asymptomatic vs symptomatic.
Results:
Asymptomatic subjects tended to have low neurofibrillary tangle scores but a wide range of neuritic plaque frequencies. There were, however, a few asymptomatic subjects with very high tangle and neuritic plaque burden, as well as symptomatic subjects with few changes. In the multivariable model, asymptomatic subjects were older (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–1.07), had lower clinical Hachinski Ischemic Score (OR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.69–0.97), were less likely to have an APOE ε4 allele (OR = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.16–0.83), and had lower neurofibrillary tangle score (OR = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.17–0.45) compared with symptomatic subjects.
Conclusions:
Dissociating clinical symptoms from pathologic findings better allows for investigation of preclinical AD. Our results suggest that although the severity of the pathology, particularly neurofibrillary tangles, has a large role in determining the extent of symptoms, other factors, including age, APOE status, and comorbidities such as cerebrovascular disease also explain differences in clinical presentation.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e318295d7a1
PMCID: PMC3716351  PMID: 23645594
11.  LAMINAR DISTRIBUTION OF THE PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN SPORADIC FRONTOTEMPORAL LOBAR DEGENERATION WITH TDP-43 PROTEINOPATHY: A QUANTITATIVE STUDY USING POLYNOMIAL CURVE FITTING 
Aims
Previous data suggest heterogeneity in laminar distribution of the pathology in the molecular disorder frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with transactive response (TAR) DNA-binding protein of 43kDa (TDP-43) proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP). To study this heterogeneity, we quantified the changes in density across the cortical laminae of neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI), glial inclusions (GI), neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NII), dystrophic neurites (DN), surviving neurons, abnormally enlarged neurons (EN), and vacuoles in regions of the frontal and temporal lobe.
Methods
Changes in density of histological features across cortical gyri were studied in ten sporadic cases of FTLD-TDP using quantitative methods and polynomial curve-fitting.
Results
Our data suggest that laminar neuropathology in sporadic FTLD-TDP is highly variable. Most commonly, NCI, DN, and vacuolation were abundant in the upper laminae and GI, NII, EN, and glial cell nuclei in the lower laminae. TDP-43-immunoreactive inclusions affected more of the cortical profile in longer duration cases, their distribution varied with disease subtype, but was unrelated to Braak tangle score. Different TDP-43-immunoreactive inclusions were not spatially correlated.
Conclusions
Laminar distribution of pathological features in ten sporadic cases of FTLD-TDL is heterogeneous and may be accounted for, in part, by disease subtype and disease duration. In addition, the feed-forward and feed-back cortico-cortical connections may be compromised in FTLD-TDP.
doi:10.1111/j.1365-2990.2012.01291.x
PMCID: PMC3504185  PMID: 22804696
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP); FTLD with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U); Transactive response TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43); Neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI); Laminar distribution
12.  The cytoskeleton in neurodegenerative diseases 
The Journal of pathology  2004;204(4):438-449.
Abundant abnormal aggregates of cytoskeletal proteins are neuropathological signatures of many neurodegenerative diseases that are broadly classified by filamentous aggregates of neuronal intermediate filament (IF) proteins, or by inclusions containing the microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau. The discovery of mutations in neuronal IF and tau genes firmly establishes the importance of neuronal IF proteins and tau in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple IF gene mutations are pathogenic for Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — in addition to those in the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) gene. Tau gene mutations are pathogenic for frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), and tau polymorphisms are genetic risk factors for sporadic progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Thus, IF and tau abnormalities are linked directly to the aetiology and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. In vitro and transgenic animal models are being used to demonstrate that different mutations impair protein function, promote tau fibrilization, or perturb tau gene splicing, leading to aberrant and distinct tau aggregates. For recognition of these disorders at neuropathological examination, immunohistochemistry is needed, and this may be combined with biochemistry and molecular genetics to properly determine the nosology of a particular case. As reviewed here, the identification of molecular genetic defects and biochemical alterations in cytoskeletal proteins of human neurodegenerative diseases has facilitated experimental studies and will promote the development of assays of molecules which inhibit abnormal neuronal IF and tau protein inclusions.
doi:10.1002/path.1650
PMCID: PMC3011821  PMID: 15495240
neuronal intermediate filament; tau; cytoskeleton; mutation; neurodegenerative disease; peripheral neuropathy
13.  Frontotemporal Degeneration, the Next Therapeutic Frontier: Molecules and Animal Models for FTD drug development (Part 1 of 2 articles) 
Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) is a common cause of dementia for which there are currently no approved therapies. Over the past decade there has been an explosion of knowledge about the biology and clinical features of FTD that has identified a number of promising therapeutic targets as well as animal models in which to develop drugs. The close association of some forms of FTD with neuropathological accumulation of tau protein or increased neuroinflammation due to progranulin protein deficiency suggests that a drug’s success in treating FTD may predict efficacy in more common diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A variety of regulatory incentives, clinical features of FTD, such as rapid disease progression, and relatively pure molecular pathology, suggest that there are advantages to developing drugs for FTD as compared to other more common neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. In March 2011, the Frontotemporal Dementia Treatment Study Group (FTSG) sponsored a conference entitled,“ FTD, the Next Therapeutic Frontier,” focused on pre-clinical aspects of FTD drug development. The goal of the meeting was to promote collaborations between academic researchers and biotechnology and pharmaceutical researchers to accelerate the development of new treatments for FTD. Here we report the key findings from the conference, including the rationale for FTD drug development, epidemiological, genetic and neuropathological features of FTD, FTD animal models and how best to use them and examples of successful drug-development collaborations in other neurodegenerative diseases.
doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2012.03.002
PMCID: PMC3542408  PMID: 23043900
14.  The Advantages of FTD Drug Development (Part 2 of FTD: The Next Therapeutic Frontier) 
Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) encompasses a spectrum of related neurodegenerative disorders with behavioral, language and motor phenotypes for which there are currently no effective therapies. This manuscript is the second of two articles that summarize the presentations and discussions that occurred at two symposia in 2011 sponsored by the Frontotemporal Dementia Treatment Study Group (FTSG), a collaborative group of academic and industry researchers that is devoted to developing treatments for FTD. This manuscript discusses the current status of FTD clinical research that is relevant to the conduct of clinical trials and why FTD research may be an attractive pathway for developing therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. The clinical and molecular features of FTD, including rapid disease progression and relatively pure molecular pathology, suggest that there are advantages to developing drugs for FTD as compared to other dementias. FTD qualifies as orphan indication, providing additional advantages for drug development. Two recent sets of consensus diagnostic criteria will facilitate the identification of patients with FTD, and a variety of neuropsychological, functional and behavioral scales have been shown to be sensitive to disease progression. Moreover, quantitative neuroimaging measurements demonstrate progressive brain atrophy in FTD at rates that may surpass Alzheimer's disease (AD). Finally, the similarities between FTD and other neurodegenerative diseases with drug development efforts already underway suggest that FTD researchers will be able to draw upon this experience to create a roadmap for FTD drug development. We conclude that FTD research has reached sufficient maturity to pursue clinical development of specific FTD therapies.
doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2012.03.003
PMCID: PMC3562382  PMID: 23062850
15.  Amyloid-beta Oligomerization in Alzheimer Dementia vs. High Pathology Controls 
Annals of neurology  2012;73(1):104-119.
Objective
While amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide deposition into insoluble plaques is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, soluble oligomeric Aβ has been hypothesized to more directly underlie impaired learning and memory in dementia of the Alzheimer type. However, the lack of a sensitive, specific, and quantitative assay for Aβ oligomers has hampered rigorous tests of this hypothesis.
Methods
We developed a plate-based single molecule counting fluorescence immunoassay for oligomeric Aβ sensitive to low pg/ml concentrations of synthetic Aβ dimers using the same Aβ-specific monoclonal antibody to both capture and detect Aβ. The Aβ oligomer assay does not recognize monomeric Aβ, amyloid precursor protein, or other non-Aβ peptide oligomers.
Results
Aβ oligomers were detected in aqueous cortical lysates from patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and non-demented patients with Aβ plaque pathology. However, Aβ oligomer concentrations in demented patients’ lysates were tightly correlated with Aβ plaque coverage (r=0.88), but this relationship was weaker in those from non-demented patients (r=0.30) despite equivalent Aβ plaque pathology. The ratio of Aβ oligomer levels to plaque density fully distinguished demented from non-demented patients, with no overlap between groups in this derived variable. Other Aβ and plaque measures did not distinguish demented from non-demented patients. Aβ oligomers were not detected in cerebrospinal fluid with this assay.
Interpretation
The results raise the intriguing hypothesis that the linkage between plaques and oligomers may be a key pathophysiological event underlying dementia of the Alzheimer type. This Aβ oligomer assay may be useful for many tests of the oligomer hypothesis.
doi:10.1002/ana.23748
PMCID: PMC3563737  PMID: 23225543
amyloid-beta; oligomer; Alzheimer’s disease
16.  Different molecular pathologies result in similar spatial patterns of cellular inclusions in neurodegenerative disease: a comparative study of eight disorders 
Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996)  2012;119(12):10.1007/s00702-012-0838-3.
Recent research suggests cell-to-cell transfer of pathogenic proteins such as tau and α-synuclein may play a role in neurodegeneration. Pathogenic spread along neural pathways may give rise to specific spatial patterns of the neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI) characteristic of these disorders. Hence, the spatial patterns of NCI were compared in four tauopathies, viz., Alzheimer’s disease, Pick’s disease, corticobasal degeneration, and progressive supranuclear palsy, two synucleinopathies, viz., dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy, the ‘fused in sarcoma’ (FUS)-immunoreactive inclusions in neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease, and the transactive response DNA-binding protein (TDP-43)-immunoreactive inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, a TDP-43 proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP). Regardless of molecular group or morphology, NCI were most frequently aggregated into clusters, the clusters being regularly distributed parallel to the pia mater. In a significant proportion of regions, the regularly distributed clusters were in the size range 400–800 μm, approximating to the dimension of cell columns associated with the cortico-cortical pathways. The data suggest that cortical NCI in different disorders exhibit a similar spatial pattern in the cortex consistent with pathogenic spread along anatomical pathways. Hence, treatments designed to protect the cortex from neurodegeneration may be applicable across several different disorders.
doi:10.1007/s00702-012-0838-3
PMCID: PMC3863379  PMID: 22678700
Tauopathy; Synucleinopathy; FUS proteinopathy; TDP-43 proteinopathy; Spatial patterns; Neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI); Cell to cell transfer
17.  Nuclear Carrier and RNA Binding Proteins in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration associated with Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) pathological changes 
Neuropathology and applied neurobiology  2012;10.1111/j.1365-2990.2012.01274.x.
Aims
We aimed to investigate the role of the nuclear carrier and binding proteins, transportin-1 (TRN1) and transportin-2 (TRN2), TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15 (TAF15) and Ewing’s Sarcoma protein (EWS) in inclusion body formation in cases of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) associated with Fused in Sarcoma protein (FTLD-FUS).
Methods
Eight cases of FTLD-FUS (5 cases of atypical FTLD-U (aFTLD-U), 2 of Neuronal Intermediate Filament Inclusion Body Disease (NIFID) and 1 of Basophilic Inclusion Body Disease (BIBD)) were immunostained for FUS, TRN1, TRN2, TAF15 and EWS. 10 cases of FTLD associated with TDP-43 inclusions served as reference cases.
Results
The inclusion bodies in FTLD-FUS contained TRN1 and TAF15 and, to a lesser extent, EWS, but not TRN2. The patterns of immunostaining for TRN1 and TAF15 were very similar to that of FUS. None of these proteins was associated with tau or TDP-43 aggregations in FTLD.
Conclusion
Data suggest that FUS, TRN1 and TAF15 may participate in a functional pathway in an interdependent way, and imply that the function of TDP-43 may not necessarily be in parallel with, or complementary to, that of FUS, despite each protein sharing many similar structural elements.
doi:10.1111/j.1365-2990.2012.01274.x
PMCID: PMC3479345  PMID: 22497712
Frontotemporal Lobar degeneration; Fused in Sarcoma; TDP-43; transportins; TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15; Ewing’s sarcoma protein
18.  Clinical and multimodal biomarker correlates of ADNI neuropathological findings 
Background
Autopsy series commonly report a high percentage of coincident pathologies in demented patients, including patients with a clinical diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). However many clinical and biomarker studies report cases with a single neurodegenerative disease. We examined multimodal biomarker correlates of the consecutive series of the first 22 Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative autopsies. Clinical data, neuropsychological measures, cerebrospinal fluid Aβ, total and phosphorylated tau and α-synuclein and MRI and FDG-PET scans.
Results
Clinical diagnosis was either probable DAT or Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-type mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at last evaluation prior to death. All patients had a pathological diagnosis of AD, but only four had pure AD. A coincident pathological diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), medial temporal lobe pathology (TDP-43 proteinopathy, argyrophilic grain disease and hippocampal sclerosis), referred to collectively here as MTL, and vascular pathology were present in 45.5%, 40.0% and 22.7% of these patients, respectively. Hallucinations were a strong predictor of coincident DLB (100% specificity) and a more severe dysexecutive profile was also a useful predictor of coincident DLB (80.0% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity). Occipital FDG-PET hypometabolism accurately classified coincident DLB (80% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Subjects with coincident MTL showed lower hippocampal volume.
Conclusions
Biomarkers can be used to independently predict coincident AD and DLB pathology, a common finding in amnestic MCI and DAT patients. Cohorts with comprehensive neuropathological assessments and multimodal biomarkers are needed to characterize independent predictors for the different neuropathological substrates of cognitive impairment.
doi:10.1186/2051-5960-1-65
PMCID: PMC3893373  PMID: 24252435
Alzheimer’s disease; Mild cognitive impairment; CSF; MRI; Autopsy; Neuropathology; Dementia; Biomarkers; Amyloid; Tau
19.  Developing an international network for Alzheimer research: The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network 
Clinical investigation  2012;2(10):975-984.
The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) is a collaborative effort of international Alzheimer disease (AD) centers that are conducting a multifaceted prospective biomarker study in individuals at-risk for autosomal dominant AD (ADAD). DIAN collects comprehensive information and tissue in accordance with standard protocols from asymptomatic and symptomatic ADAD mutation carriers and their non-carrier family members to determine the pathochronology of clinical, cognitive, neuroimaging, and fluid biomarkers of AD. This article describes the structure, implementation, and underlying principles of DIAN, as well as the demographic features of the initial DIAN cohort.
doi:10.4155/cli.12.93
PMCID: PMC3489185  PMID: 23139856
Alzheimer disease; autosomal dominant; biomarkers of Alzheimer disease; PSEN1; PSEN2; APP; amyloid-beta; preclinical Alzheimer disease
20.  Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis 
Whitcomb, David C. | LaRusch, Jessica | Krasinskas, Alyssa M. | Klei, Lambertus | Smith, Jill P. | Brand, Randall E. | Neoptolemos, John P. | Lerch, Markus M. | Tector, Matt | Sandhu, Bimaljit S. | Guda, Nalini M. | Orlichenko, Lidiya | Alkaade, Samer | Amann, Stephen T. | Anderson, Michelle A. | Baillie, John | Banks, Peter A. | Conwell, Darwin | Coté, Gregory A. | Cotton, Peter B. | DiSario, James | Farrer, Lindsay A. | Forsmark, Chris E. | Johnstone, Marianne | Gardner, Timothy B. | Gelrud, Andres | Greenhalf, William | Haines, Jonathan L. | Hartman, Douglas J. | Hawes, Robert A. | Lawrence, Christopher | Lewis, Michele | Mayerle, Julia | Mayeux, Richard | Melhem, Nadine M. | Money, Mary E. | Muniraj, Thiruvengadam | Papachristou, Georgios I. | Pericak-Vance, Margaret A. | Romagnuolo, Joseph | Schellenberg, Gerard D. | Sherman, Stuart | Simon, Peter | Singh, Vijay K. | Slivka, Adam | Stolz, Donna | Sutton, Robert | Weiss, Frank Ulrich | Wilcox, C. Mel | Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian | Wisniewski, Stephen R. | O'Connell, Michael R. | Kienholz, Michelle L. | Roeder, Kathryn | Barmada, M. Michael | Yadav, Dhiraj | Devlin, Bernie | Albert, Marilyn S. | Albin, Roger L. | Apostolova, Liana G. | Arnold, Steven E. | Baldwin, Clinton T. | Barber, Robert | Barnes, Lisa L. | Beach, Thomas G. | Beecham, Gary W. | Beekly, Duane | Bennett, David A. | Bigio, Eileen H. | Bird, Thomas D. | Blacker, Deborah | Boxer, Adam | Burke, James R. | Buxbaum, Joseph D. | Cairns, Nigel J. | Cantwell, Laura B. | Cao, Chuanhai | Carney, Regina M. | Carroll, Steven L. | Chui, Helena C. | Clark, David G. | Cribbs, David H. | Crocco, Elizabeth A. | Cruchaga, Carlos | DeCarli, Charles | Demirci, F. Yesim | Dick, Malcolm | Dickson, Dennis W. | Duara, Ranjan | Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer | Faber, Kelley M. | Fallon, Kenneth B. | Farlow, Martin R. | Ferris, Steven | Foroud, Tatiana M. | Frosch, Matthew P. | Galasko, Douglas R. | Ganguli, Mary | Gearing, Marla | Geschwind, Daniel H. | Ghetti, Bernardino | Gilbert, John R. | Gilman, Sid | Glass, Jonathan D. | Goate, Alison M. | Graff-Radford, Neill R. | Green, Robert C. | Growdon, John H. | Hakonarson, Hakon | Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L. | Hamilton, Ronald L. | Harrell, Lindy E. | Head, Elizabeth | Honig, Lawrence S. | Hulette, Christine M. | Hyman, Bradley T. | Jicha, Gregory A. | Jin, Lee-Way | Jun, Gyungah | Kamboh, M. Ilyas | Karydas, Anna | Kaye, Jeffrey A. | Kim, Ronald | Koo, Edward H. | Kowall, Neil W. | Kramer, Joel H. | Kramer, Patricia | Kukull, Walter A. | LaFerla, Frank M. | Lah, James J. | Leverenz, James B. | Levey, Allan I. | Li, Ge | Lin, Chiao-Feng | Lieberman, Andrew P. | Lopez, Oscar L. | Lunetta, Kathryn L. | Lyketsos, Constantine G. | Mack, Wendy J. | Marson, Daniel C. | Martin, Eden R. | Martiniuk, Frank | Mash, Deborah C. | Masliah, Eliezer | McKee, Ann C. | Mesulam, Marsel | Miller, Bruce L. | Miller, Carol A. | Miller, Joshua W. | Montine, Thomas J. | Morris, John C. | Murrell, Jill R. | Naj, Adam C. | Olichney, John M. | Parisi, Joseph E. | Peskind, Elaine | Petersen, Ronald C. | Pierce, Aimee | Poon, Wayne W. | Potter, Huntington | Quinn, Joseph F. | Raj, Ashok | Raskind, Murray | Reiman, Eric M. | Reisberg, Barry | Reitz, Christiane | Ringman, John M. | Roberson, Erik D. | Rosen, Howard J. | Rosenberg, Roger N. | Sano, Mary | Saykin, Andrew J. | Schneider, Julie A. | Schneider, Lon S. | Seeley, William W. | Smith, Amanda G. | Sonnen, Joshua A. | Spina, Salvatore | Stern, Robert A. | Tanzi, Rudolph E. | Trojanowski, John Q. | Troncoso, Juan C. | Tsuang, Debby W. | Valladares, Otto | Van Deerlin, Vivianna M. | Van Eldik, Linda J. | Vardarajan, Badri N. | Vinters, Harry V. | Vonsattel, Jean Paul | Wang, Li-San | Weintraub, Sandra | Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A. | Williamson, Jennifer | Woltjer, Randall L. | Wright, Clinton B. | Younkin, Steven G. | Yu, Chang-En | Yu, Lei
Nature genetics  2012;44(12):1349-1354.
Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07.
doi:10.1038/ng.2466
PMCID: PMC3510344  PMID: 23143602
21.  The levels of water-soluble and triton-soluble Aβ are increased in Alzheimer's disease brain 
Brain Research  2012;1450:138-147.
Although plaques composed of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are considered a defining feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), they are also found in cognitively normal individuals and extensive evidence suggests that non-plaque, water-soluble forms of Aβ may play a role in AD pathogenesis. However, the relationship between the levels of water-soluble Aβ and the clinical severity of disease has never been investigated. Here, we present results of a pilot study designed to examine the levels of water-soluble forms of Aβ in brains of individuals who died at clinically distinct stages of AD. Using a serial extraction method, we also investigated the levels of triton-soluble and formic acid-soluble Aβ. We found that water-soluble and detergent-soluble Aβ monomer and SDS-stable dimer were elevated in AD and that the levels of water soluble Aβ did not increase with plaque pathology. These results support the notion that both water- and detergent-soluble Aβ are important in AD and are not simply released from plaques by mechanical disruption. Moreover, the fact that the levels of water- and triton-soluble Aβ were similar in very mild/mild AD and moderate/severe AD suggests that once a certain level of these species is attained, further accumulation is not necessary for the disease to progress. Consequently, therapeutic targeting of water-soluble Aβ should best benefit individuals in earliest phases of the disease process.
doi:10.1016/j.brainres.2012.02.041
PMCID: PMC3319647  PMID: 22440675
Alzheimer's disease; amyloid β-protein; water-soluble Aβ; SDS-stable Aβ dimer; neuritic plaques
22.  Pathologic Accumulation of α-Synuclein and Aβ in Parkinson Disease Patients With Dementia 
Archives of neurology  2012;69(10):1326-1331.
Objective
To determine the relative contributions of individual pathologic protein deposits associated with parkinson disease (PD).
Design
Autopsied patients were analyzed from February 24, 2005, through July 25, 2010, to determine the distribution and severity of individual pathologic protein deposits (α-synuclein, Aβ, and tau) using routine protocols for histologic and immunohistochemical analysis and established neuropathologic staging criteria. Clinical data were extracted from an electronic medical record system used for all patients with PD.
Patients
Thirty-two consecutive autopsied patients treated at the Washington University Movement Disorders Center who had neuropathologic confirmation of PD and a history of dementia, regardless of the timing of the onset of dementia with respect to motor symptoms.
Results
Three pathologic subgroups of dementia associated with PD were identified: (1) predominant synucleinopathy (Braak Lewy body stages 5–6) (12 [38%]), (2) predominant synucleinopathy with Aβ deposition (Braak amyloid stages B–C) but minimal or no cortical tau deposition (19 [99%]), and (3) synucleinopathy and Aβ deposition with at least moderate neocortical tauopathy (Braak tau stages 5–6; 1 [3%]). Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses revealed that patients with synucleinopathy plus Aβ deposition had significantly shorter survival (years from PD onset until death and years from dementia onset until death) than patients with synucleinopathy only.
Conclusions
Dementia associated with PD has 2 major pathologic subgroups: neocortical synucleinopathy and neocortical synucleinopathy with Aβ deposition. Alzheimer disease with neocortical Aβ and tau deposition does not commonly cause dementia with PD. Furthermore, accumulation of Aβ is associated with lower survival rates in PD patients with dementia. Additional studies are needed to prospectively determine the association between α-synuclein and Aβ accumulation and the role of Aβ in the development and progression of cognitive impairment in PD.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2012.1608
PMCID: PMC3616136  PMID: 22825369
23.  Clinical and Biomarker Changes in Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Disease 
The New England journal of medicine  2012;367(9):795-804.
BACKGROUND
The order and magnitude of pathologic processes in Alzheimer’s disease are not well understood, partly because the disease develops over many years. Autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease has a predictable age at onset and provides an opportunity to determine the sequence and magnitude of pathologic changes that culminate in symptomatic disease.
METHODS
In this prospective, longitudinal study, we analyzed data from 128 participants who underwent baseline clinical and cognitive assessments, brain imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood tests. We used the participant’s age at baseline assessment and the parent’s age at the onset of symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease to calculate the estimated years from expected symptom onset (age of the participant minus parent’s age at symptom onset). We conducted cross-sectional analyses of baseline data in relation to estimated years from expected symptom onset in order to determine the relative order and magnitude of pathophysiological changes.
RESULTS
Concentrations of amyloid-beta (Aβ)42 in the CSF appeared to decline 25 years before expected symptom onset. Aβ deposition, as measured by positron-emission tomography with the use of Pittsburgh compound B, was detected 15 years before expected symptom onset. Increased concentrations of tau protein in the CSF and an increase in brain atrophy were detected 15 years before expected symptom onset. Cerebral hypometabolism and impaired episodic memory were observed 10 years before expected symptom onset. Global cognitive impairment, as measured by the Mini–Mental State Examination and the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, was detected 5 years before expected symptom onset, and patients met diagnostic criteria for dementia at an average of 3 years after expected symptom onset.
CONCLUSIONS
We found that autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease was associated with a series of pathophysiological changes over decades in CSF biochemical markers of Alzheimer’s disease, brain amyloid deposition, and brain metabolism as well as progressive cognitive impairment. Our results require confirmation with the use of longitudinal data and may not apply to patients with sporadic Alzheimer’s disease. (Funded by the National Institute on Aging and others; DIAN ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00869817.)
doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1202753
PMCID: PMC3474597  PMID: 22784036
24.  A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF THE NEUROPATHOLOGY OF THIRTY-TWO SPORADIC AND FAMILIAL CASES OF FRONTOTEMPORAL LOBAR DEGENERATION WITH TDP-43 PROTEINOPATHY (FTLD-TDP) 
Aims
To further characterize the neuropathology of the heterogeneous molecular disorder frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with transactive response (TAR) DNA-binding protein of 43kDa (TDP-43) proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP).
Methods
We quantified the neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI), glial inclusions (GI), neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NII), dystrophic neurites (DN), surviving neurons, abnormally enlarged neurons (EN), and vacuoles in regions of the frontal and temporal lobe using a phosphorylation independent TDP-43 antibody in thirty-two cases of FTLD-TDP comprising sporadic and familial cases, with associated pathology such as hippocampal sclerosis (HS) or Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and four neuropathological subtypes using TDP-43 immunohistochemistry. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare differences between the various groups of cases.
Results
These data from FTLD-TDP cases demonstrate quantitative differences in pathological features between: (1) regions of the frontal and temporal lobe, (2) upper and lower cortex, (3) sporadic and progranulin (GRN) mutation cases, (4) cases with and without AD or HS, and (5) between assigned subtypes.
Conclusions
The data confirm that the dentate gyrus is a major site of neuropathology in FTLD-TDP and that most laminae of the cerebral cortex are affected. GRN mutation cases are quantitatively different from sporadic cases while cases with associated HS and AD have increased densities of dystrophic neurites (DN) and abnormally enlarged neurons (EN) respectively. There is little correlation between the subjective assessment of subtypes and the more objective quantitative data.
doi:10.1111/j.1365-2990.2011.01188.x
PMCID: PMC3206199  PMID: 21696412
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with transactive response (TAR) DNA-binding protein of 43kDa (TDP-43) proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP); Density; Neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI); Neuronal intranuclear inclusion (NII)
25.  The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception 
The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The study aimed to enroll 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with early AD and 200 normal controls and $67 million funding was provided by both the public and private sectors including the National Institutes on Aging, thirteen pharmaceutical companies and two Foundations that provided support through the Foundation for NIH (FNIH). This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results as of February, 2011. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been 1) the development of standardized methods for clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multi-center setting; 2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control, MCI and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β amyloid (Aβ) cascade [1] and tau mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD while brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; 3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers combine optimum features from multiple modalities including MRI, FDG-PET, CSF biomarkers and clinical tests; 4) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers, Aβ42 and tau as well as amyloid PET may reflect the earliest steps in AD pathology in mildly or even non-symptomatic subjects and are leading candidates for the detection of AD in its preclinical stages; 5) the improvement of clinical trial efficiency through the identification of subjects most likely to undergo imminent future clinical decline and the use of more sensitive outcome measures to reduce sample sizes. Baseline cognitive and/or MRI measures generally predicted future decline better than other modalities whereas MRI measures of change were shown to be the most efficient outcome measures; 6) the confirmation of the AD risk loci CLU, CR1 and PICALM and the identification of novel candidate risk loci; 7) worldwide impact through the establishment of ADNI-like programs in Europe, Asia and Australia; 8) understanding the biology and pathobiology of normal aging, MCI and AD through integration of ADNI biomarker data with clinical data from ADNI to stimulate research that will resolve controversies about competing hypotheses on the etiopathogenesis of AD thereby advancing efforts to find disease modifying drugs for AD; and 9) the establishment of infrastructure to allow sharing of all raw and processed data without embargo to interested scientific investigators throughout the world. The ADNI study was extended by a two year Grand Opportunities grant in 2009 and a renewal of ADNI (ADNI2) in October, 2010 through to 2016, with enrollment of an additional 550 participants.
doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2011.09.172
PMCID: PMC3329969  PMID: 22047634

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