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1.  Statistical colocalization of monocyte gene expression and genetic risk variants for type 1 diabetes 
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(12):2815-2824.
One mechanism by which disease-associated DNA variation can alter disease risk is altering gene expression. However, linkage disequilibrium (LD) between variants, mostly single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), means it is not sufficient to show that a particular variant associates with both disease and expression, as there could be two distinct causal variants in LD. Here, we describe a formal statistical test of colocalization and apply it to type 1 diabetes (T1D)-associated regions identified mostly through genome-wide association studies and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) discovered in a recently determined large monocyte expression data set from the Gutenberg Health Study (1370 individuals), with confirmation sought in an additional data set from the Cardiogenics Transcriptome Study (558 individuals). We excluded 39 out of 60 overlapping eQTLs in 49 T1D regions from possible colocalization and identified 21 coincident eQTLs, representing 21 genes in 14 distinct T1D regions. Our results reflect the importance of monocyte (and their derivatives, macrophage and dendritic cell) gene expression in human T1D and support the candidacy of several genes as causal factors in autoimmune pancreatic beta-cell destruction, including AFF3, CD226, CLECL1, DEXI, FKRP, PRKD2, RNLS, SMARCE1 and SUOX, in addition to the recently described GPR183 (EBI2) gene.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds098
PMCID: PMC3363338  PMID: 22403184
2.  DNA methylation profiling of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22 
Nature genetics  2006;38(12):1378-1385.
DNA methylation constitutes the most stable type of epigenetic modifications modulating the transcriptional plasticity of mammalian genomes. Using bisulfite DNA sequencing, we report high-resolution methylation reference profiles of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22, providing a resource of about 1.9 million CpG methylation values derived from 12 different tissues. Analysis of 6 annotation categories, revealed evolutionary conserved regions to be the predominant sites for differential DNA methylation and a core region surrounding the transcriptional start site as informative surrogate for promoter methylation. We find 17% of the 873 analyzed genes differentially methylated in their 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTR) and about one third of the differentially methylated 5′-UTRs to be inversely correlated with transcription. While our study was controlled for factors reported to affect DNA methylation such as sex and age, we did not find any significant attributable effects. Our data suggest DNA methylation to be ontogenetically more stable than previously thought.
doi:10.1038/ng1909
PMCID: PMC3082778  PMID: 17072317

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