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1.  Pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of LDL cholesterol response to statins 
Postmus, Iris | Trompet, Stella | Deshmukh, Harshal A. | Barnes, Michael R. | Li, Xiaohui | Warren, Helen R. | Chasman, Daniel I. | Zhou, Kaixin | Arsenault, Benoit J. | Donnelly, Louise A. | Wiggins, Kerri L. | Avery, Christy L. | Griffin, Paula | Feng, QiPing | Taylor, Kent D. | Li, Guo | Evans, Daniel S. | Smith, Albert V. | de Keyser, Catherine E. | Johnson, Andrew D. | de Craen, Anton J. M. | Stott, David J. | Buckley, Brendan M. | Ford, Ian | Westendorp, Rudi G. J. | Eline Slagboom, P. | Sattar, Naveed | Munroe, Patricia B. | Sever, Peter | Poulter, Neil | Stanton, Alice | Shields, Denis C. | O’Brien, Eoin | Shaw-Hawkins, Sue | Ida Chen, Y.-D. | Nickerson, Deborah A. | Smith, Joshua D. | Pierre Dubé, Marie | Matthijs Boekholdt, S. | Kees Hovingh, G. | Kastelein, John J. P. | McKeigue, Paul M. | Betteridge, John | Neil, Andrew | Durrington, Paul N. | Doney, Alex | Carr, Fiona | Morris, Andrew | McCarthy, Mark I. | Groop, Leif | Ahlqvist, Emma | Bis, Joshua C. | Rice, Kenneth | Smith, Nicholas L. | Lumley, Thomas | Whitsel, Eric A. | Stürmer, Til | Boerwinkle, Eric | Ngwa, Julius S. | O’Donnell, Christopher J. | Vasan, Ramachandran S. | Wei, Wei-Qi | Wilke, Russell A. | Liu, Ching-Ti | Sun, Fangui | Guo, Xiuqing | Heckbert, Susan R | Post, Wendy | Sotoodehnia, Nona | Arnold, Alice M. | Stafford, Jeanette M. | Ding, Jingzhong | Herrington, David M. | Kritchevsky, Stephen B. | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Launer, Leonore J. | Harris, Tamara B. | Chu, Audrey Y. | Giulianini, Franco | MacFadyen, Jean G. | Barratt, Bryan J. | Nyberg, Fredrik | Stricker, Bruno H. | Uitterlinden, André G. | Hofman, Albert | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Emilsson, Valur | Franco, Oscar H. | Ridker, Paul M. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Liu, Yongmei | Denny, Joshua C. | Ballantyne, Christie M. | Rotter, Jerome I. | Adrienne Cupples, L. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Palmer, Colin N. A. | Tardif, Jean-Claude | Colhoun, Helen M. | Hitman, Graham | Krauss, Ronald M. | Wouter Jukema, J | Caulfield, Mark J.
Nature Communications  2014;5:5068.
Statins effectively lower LDL cholesterol levels in large studies and the observed interindividual response variability may be partially explained by genetic variation. Here we perform a pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in studies addressing the LDL cholesterol response to statins, including up to 18,596 statin-treated subjects. We validate the most promising signals in a further 22,318 statin recipients and identify two loci, SORT1/CELSR2/PSRC1 and SLCO1B1, not previously identified in GWAS. Moreover, we confirm the previously described associations with APOE and LPA. Our findings advance the understanding of the pharmacogenetic architecture of statin response.
Statins are effectively used to prevent and manage cardiovascular disease, but patient response to these drugs is highly variable. Here, the authors identify two new genes associated with the response of LDL cholesterol to statins and advance our understanding of the genetic basis of drug response.
doi:10.1038/ncomms6068
PMCID: PMC4220464  PMID: 25350695
2.  Levels and changes of HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I in relation to risk of cardiovascular events among statin-treated patients; a meta-analysis 
Circulation  2013;128(14):10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.002670.
Background
It is unclear whether levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) remain inversely associated with cardiovascular risk among patients who achieve very low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) on statin therapy. It is also unknown whether a rise in HDL-C or apoA-I after initiation of statin therapy is associated with a reduced cardiovascular risk.
Methods and results
We performed a meta-analysis of 8 statin trials in which lipids and apolipoproteins were determined in all study participants at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. Individual patient data were obtained for 38,153 trial participants allocated to statin therapy, of whom 5387 suffered a major cardiovascular event. HDL-C levels were associated with a reduced risk of major cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio 0.83, 95%CI 0.81–0.86 per 1 standard deviation increment), as were apoA-I levels (HR 0.79, 95%CI 0.72–0.82). This association was also observed among patients achieving on-statin LDL-C levels < 50 mg/dL. An increase of HDL-C was not associated with reduced cardiovascular risk (HR 0.98, 95%CI 0.94–1.01 per 1 standard deviation increment), whereas a rise in apoA-I was (HR 0.93, 95%CI 0.90–0.97).
Conclusions
Among patients treated with statin therapy, HDL-C and apoA-I levels were strongly associated with a reduced cardiovascular risk, even among those achieving very low LDL-C. An apoA-I increase was associated with a reduced risk of major cardiovascular events, whereas for HDL-C this was not the case. These findings suggest that therapies that increase apoA-I concentration require further exploration with regard to cardiovascular risk reduction.
doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.002670
PMCID: PMC3807966  PMID: 23965489
high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; apolipoprotein; meta-analysis; cardiovascular outcomes
3.  The effects of vitamin D2 or D3 supplementation on glycaemic control and related metabolic parameters in people at risk of type 2 diabetes: protocol of a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial 
BMC Public Health  2013;13:999.
Background
The global prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing. Effective strategies to address this public health challenge are currently lacking. A number of epidemiological studies have reported associations between low concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitamin D and the incidence of diabetes, but a causal link has not been established. We investigate the effect of vitamin D supplementation on the metabolic status of individuals at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Methods/design
In a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial individuals identified as having a high risk of type 2 diabetes (non-diabetic hyperglycaemia or positive diabetes risk score) are randomised into one of three groups and given 4 doses of either placebo, or 100,000 IU Vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) or 100,000 IU Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) at monthly intervals. The primary outcome measure is the change in glycated haemoglobin level between baseline and 4 months. Secondary outcome measures include blood pressure, lipid levels, apolipoproteins, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and safety of supplementation. and C-reactive protein. The trial is being conducted at two sites (London and Cambridge, U.K.) and a total of 342 participants are being recruited.
Discussion
Trial data examining whether supplementation of vitamin D improves glycaemic status and other metabolic parameters in people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes are sparse. This trial will evaluate the causal role of vitamin D in hyperglycaemia and risk of type 2 diabetes. Specific features of this trial include recruitment of participants from different ethnic groups, investigation of the relative effectiveness and safety of vitamin D2 and D3 and an evidence based approach to determination of the dose of supplementation.
Trial registration
EudraCT2009-011264-11; ISRCTN86515510
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-999
PMCID: PMC3819003  PMID: 24152375
Vitamin D2; Vitamin D3; Placebo; Type 2 diabetes; Randomised; Trial; Intervention
4.  Multiple type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes following genome-wide association scan in UK samples 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2007;316(5829):1336-1341.
The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes are poorly understood. Starting from genome-wide genotype data for 1,924 diabetic cases and 2,938 population controls generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, we set out to detect replicated diabetes association signals through analysis of 3,757 additional cases and 5,346 controls, and by integration of our findings with equivalent data from other international consortia. We detected diabetes susceptibility loci in and around the genes CDKAL1, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and IGF2BP2 and confirmed the recently described associations at HHEX/IDE and SLC30A8. Our findings provide insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes, emphasizing the contribution of multiple variants of modest effect. The regions identified underscore the importance of pathways influencing pancreatic beta cell development and function in the etiology of type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.1126/science.1142364
PMCID: PMC3772310  PMID: 17463249
5.  Genome-wide association study of genetic determinants of LDL-c response to atorvastatin therapy: importance of Lp(a) [S] 
Journal of Lipid Research  2012;53(5):1000-1011.
We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of LDL-c response to statin using data from participants in the Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS; n = 1,156), the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT; n = 895), and the observational phase of ASCOT (n = 651), all of whom were prescribed atorvastatin 10 mg. Following genome-wide imputation, we combined data from the three studies in a meta-analysis. We found associations of LDL-c response to atorvastatin that reached genome-wide significance at rs10455872 (P = 6.13 × 10−9) within the LPA gene and at two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) within the APOE region (rs445925; P = 2.22 × 10−16 and rs4420638; P = 1.01 × 10−11) that are proxies for the ϵ2 and ϵ4 variants, respectively, in APOE. The novel association with the LPA SNP was replicated in the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) trial (P = 0.009). Using CARDS data, we further showed that atorvastatin therapy did not alter lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and that Lp(a) levels accounted for all of the associations of SNPs in the LPA gene and the apparent LDL-c response levels. However, statin therapy had a similar effect in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients in the top quartile for serum Lp(a) levels (HR = 0.60) compared with those in the lower three quartiles (HR = 0.66; P = 0.8 for interaction). The data emphasize that high Lp(a) levels affect the measurement of LDL-c and the clinical estimation of LDL-c response. Therefore, an apparently lower LDL-c response to statin therapy may indicate a need for measurement of Lp(a). However, statin therapy seems beneficial even in those with high Lp(a).
doi:10.1194/jlr.P021113
PMCID: PMC3329377  PMID: 22368281
genetics; low density lipoprotein; LDL/metabolism; lipoprotein(a); statins
6.  Total Soluble and Endogenous Secretory Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products as Predictive Biomarkers of Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes 
Diabetes  2011;60(9):2379-2385.
OBJECTIVE
Circulating levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) likely comprise both a secreted isoform (esRAGE) and wild-type RAGE cleaved from the cell membrane. Both sRAGE and esRAGE have been proposed as biomarkers of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but prospective data are limited. We examined the relationship of sRAGE and esRAGE to incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in type 2 diabetic patients followed for 3.9 years in a trial of atorvastatin: the Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS).
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
We used a nested case-control design sampling all incident cases of CVD with available plasma and randomly selecting three control subjects, who were free of CVD throughout follow-up, per case. Analysis was by Cox regression with adjustment for treatment allocation and relevant covariates.
RESULTS
sRAGE and esRAGE were strongly correlated (ρ = 0.88) and were both higher in those with lower BMI (P < 0.001), higher adiponectin (P < 0.001), lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.009), and white ethnicity (P < 0.001). Both sRAGE and esRAGE were associated with incident CHD events, independently of treatment allocation and the above factors; hazard ratio (HR) = 1.74 (95% CI 1.25–2.41; P = 0.002) for a doubling of the sRAGE level; HR = 1.45 (1.11–1.89; P = 0.006) for a doubling of the esRAGE level. There was no significant association with stroke; HR for sRAGE = 0.66 (0.38–1.14). Atorvastatin, 10 mg daily, did not alter sRAGE.
CONCLUSIONS
Higher levels of sRAGE and esRAGE are associated with incident CHD but not stroke in type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.2337/db11-0291
PMCID: PMC3161327  PMID: 21771973
7.  Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis 
Voight, Benjamin F | Scott, Laura J | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Morris, Andrew P | Dina, Christian | Welch, Ryan P | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Huth, Cornelia | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | McCulloch, Laura J | Ferreira, Teresa | Grallert, Harald | Amin, Najaf | Wu, Guanming | Willer, Cristen J | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | McCarroll, Steve A | Langenberg, Claudia | Hofmann, Oliver M | Dupuis, Josée | Qi, Lu | Segrè, Ayellet V | van Hoek, Mandy | Navarro, Pau | Ardlie, Kristin | Balkau, Beverley | Benediktsson, Rafn | Bennett, Amanda J | Blagieva, Roza | Boerwinkle, Eric | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Boström, Kristina Bengtsson | Bravenboer, Bert | Bumpstead, Suzannah | Burtt, Noisël P | Charpentier, Guillaume | Chines, Peter S | Cornelis, Marilyn | Couper, David J | Crawford, Gabe | Doney, Alex S F | Elliott, Katherine S | Elliott, Amanda L | Erdos, Michael R | Fox, Caroline S | Franklin, Christopher S | Ganser, Martha | Gieger, Christian | Grarup, Niels | Green, Todd | Griffin, Simon | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Hadjadj, Samy | Hassanali, Neelam | Herder, Christian | Isomaa, Bo | Jackson, Anne U | Johnson, Paul R V | Jørgensen, Torben | Kao, Wen H L | Klopp, Norman | Kong, Augustine | Kraft, Peter | Kuusisto, Johanna | Lauritzen, Torsten | Li, Man | Lieverse, Aloysius | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Midthjell, Kristian | Morken, Mario A | Narisu, Narisu | Nilsson, Peter | Owen, Katharine R | Payne, Felicity | Perry, John R B | Petersen, Ann-Kristin | Platou, Carl | Proença, Christine | Prokopenko, Inga | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Rayner, N William | Robertson, Neil R | Rocheleau, Ghislain | Roden, Michael | Sampson, Michael J | Saxena, Richa | Shields, Beverley M | Shrader, Peter | Sigurdsson, Gunnar | Sparsø, Thomas | Strassburger, Klaus | Stringham, Heather M | Sun, Qi | Swift, Amy J | Thorand, Barbara | Tichet, Jean | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | van Dam, Rob M | van Haeften, Timon W | van Herpt, Thijs | van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V | Walters, G Bragi | Weedon, Michael N | Wijmenga, Cisca | Witteman, Jacqueline | Bergman, Richard N | Cauchi, Stephane | Collins, Francis S | Gloyn, Anna L | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hansen, Torben | Hide, Winston A | Hitman, Graham A | Hofman, Albert | Hunter, David J | Hveem, Kristian | Laakso, Markku | Mohlke, Karen L | Morris, Andrew D | Palmer, Colin N A | Pramstaller, Peter P | Rudan, Igor | Sijbrands, Eric | Stein, Lincoln D | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Uitterlinden, Andre | Walker, Mark | Wareham, Nicholas J | Watanabe, Richard M | Abecasis, Gonçalo R | Boehm, Bernhard O | Campbell, Harry | Daly, Mark J | Hattersley, Andrew T | Hu, Frank B | Meigs, James B | Pankow, James S | Pedersen, Oluf | Wichmann, H-Erich | Barroso, Inês | Florez, Jose C | Frayling, Timothy M | Groop, Leif | Sladek, Rob | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Wilson, James F | Illig, Thomas | Froguel, Philippe | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Stefansson, Kari | Altshuler, David | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I
Nature genetics  2010;42(7):579-589.
By combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals with combinedP < 5 × 10−8. These include a second independent signal at the KCNQ1 locus; the first report, to our knowledge, of an X-chromosomal association (near DUSP9); and a further instance of overlap between loci implicated in monogenic and multifactorial forms of diabetes (at HNF1A). The identified loci affect both beta-cell function and insulin action, and, overall, T2D association signals show evidence of enrichment for genes involved in cell cycle regulation. We also show that a high proportion of T2D susceptibility loci harbor independent association signals influencing apparently unrelated complex traits.
doi:10.1038/ng.609
PMCID: PMC3080658  PMID: 20581827
8.  Integrated Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Identifies Haplotype-Specific Methylation in the FTO Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Susceptibility Locus 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(11):e14040.
Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip) and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN). Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p = 9.40×10−4, permutation p = 1.0×10−3). Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p = 1.13×10−7). Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM), encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE) that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA) SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0014040
PMCID: PMC2987816  PMID: 21124985
9.  Adiposity-Related Heterogeneity in Patterns of Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Observed in Genome-Wide Association Data 
Diabetes  2009;58(2):505-510.
OBJECTIVE—This study examined how differences in the BMI distribution of type 2 diabetic case subjects affected genome-wide patterns of type 2 diabetes association and considered the implications for the etiological heterogeneity of type 2 diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We reanalyzed data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium genome-wide association scan (1,924 case subjects, 2,938 control subjects: 393,453 single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) after stratifying case subjects (into “obese” and “nonobese”) according to median BMI (30.2 kg/m2). Replication of signals in which alternative case-ascertainment strategies generated marked effect size heterogeneity in type 2 diabetes association signal was sought in additional samples.
RESULTS—In the “obese-type 2 diabetes” scan, FTO variants had the strongest type 2 diabetes effect (rs8050136: relative risk [RR] 1.49 [95% CI 1.34–1.66], P = 1.3 × 10−13), with only weak evidence for TCF7L2 (rs7901695 RR 1.21 [1.09–1.35], P = 0.001). This situation was reversed in the “nonobese” scan, with FTO association undetectable (RR 1.07 [0.97–1.19], P = 0.19) and TCF7L2 predominant (RR 1.53 [1.37–1.71], P = 1.3 × 10−14). These patterns, confirmed by replication, generated strong combined evidence for between-stratum effect size heterogeneity (FTO: PDIFF = 1.4 × 10−7; TCF7L2: PDIFF = 4.0 × 10−6). Other signals displaying evidence of effect size heterogeneity in the genome-wide analyses (on chromosomes 3, 12, 15, and 18) did not replicate. Analysis of the current list of type 2 diabetes susceptibility variants revealed nominal evidence for effect size heterogeneity for the SLC30A8 locus alone (RRobese 1.08 [1.01–1.15]; RRnonobese 1.18 [1.10–1.27]: PDIFF = 0.04).
CONCLUSIONS—This study demonstrates the impact of differences in case ascertainment on the power to detect and replicate genetic associations in genome-wide association studies. These data reinforce the notion that there is substantial etiological heterogeneity within type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.2337/db08-0906
PMCID: PMC2628627  PMID: 19056611
10.  Population-Specific Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Conferred by HNF4A P2 Promoter Variants 
Diabetes  2008;57(11):3161-3165.
OBJECTIVE—Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the P2 promoter region of HNF4A were originally shown to be associated with predisposition for type 2 diabetes in Finnish, Ashkenazi, and, more recently, Scandinavian populations, but they generated conflicting results in additional populations. We aimed to investigate whether data from a large-scale mapping approach would replicate this association in novel Ashkenazi samples and in U.K. populations and whether these data would allow us to refine the association signal.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Using a dense linkage disequilibrium map of 20q, we selected SNPs from a 10-Mb interval centered on HNF4A. In a staged approach, we first typed 4,608 SNPs in case-control populations from four U.K. populations and an Ashkenazi population (n = 2,516). In phase 2, a subset of 763 SNPs was genotyped in 2,513 additional samples from the same populations.
RESULTS—Combined analysis of both phases demonstrated association between HNF4A P2 SNPs (rs1884613 and rs2144908) and type 2 diabetes in the Ashkenazim (n = 991; P < 1.6 × 10−6). Importantly, these associations are significant in a subset of Ashkenazi samples (n = 531) not previously tested for association with P2 SNPs (odds ratio [OR] ∼1.7; P < 0.002), thus providing replication within the Ashkenazim. In the U.K. populations, this association was not significant (n = 4,022; P > 0.5), and the estimate for the OR was much smaller (OR 1.04; [95%CI 0.91–1.19]).
CONCLUSIONS—These data indicate that the risk conferred by HNF4A P2 is significantly different between U.K. and Ashkenazi populations (P < 0.00007), suggesting that the underlying causal variant remains unidentified. Interactions with other genetic or environmental factors may also contribute to this difference in risk between populations.
doi:10.2337/db08-0719
PMCID: PMC2570416  PMID: 18728231
12.  Population-Specific Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Conferred by HNF4A P2 Promoter Variants 
Diabetes  2008;57(11):3161-3165.
OBJECTIVE
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the P2 promoter region of HNF4A were originally shown to be associated with predisposition for type 2 diabetes in Finnish, Ashkenazi, and, more recently, Scandinavian populations, but they generated conflicting results in additional populations. We aimed to investigate whether data from a large-scale mapping approach would replicate this association in novel Ashkenazi samples and in U.K. populations and whether these data would allow us to refine the association signal.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Using a dense linkage disequilibrium map of 20q, we selected SNPs from a 10-Mb interval centered on HNF4A. In a staged approach, we first typed 4,608 SNPs in case-control populations from four U.K. populations and an Ashkenazi population (n = 2,516). In phase 2, a subset of 763 SNPs was genotyped in 2,513 additional samples from the same populations.
RESULTS
Combined analysis of both phases demonstrated association between HNF4A P2 SNPs (rs1884613 and rs2144908) and type 2 diabetes in the Ashkenazim (n = 991; P < 1.6 × 10−6). Importantly, these associations are significant in a subset of Ashkenazi samples (n = 531) not previously tested for association with P2 SNPs (odds ratio [OR] ~1.7; P < 0.002), thus providing replication within the Ashkenazim. In the U.K. populations, this association was not significant (n = 4,022; P > 0.5), and the estimate for the OR was much smaller (OR 1.04; [95%CI 0.91-1.19]).
CONCLUSIONS
These data indicate that the risk conferred by HNF4A P2 is significantly different between U.K. and Ashkenazi populations (P < 0.00007), suggesting that the underlying causal variant remains unidentified. Interactions with other genetic or environmental factors may also contribute to this difference in risk between populations.
doi:10.2337/db08-0719
PMCID: PMC2570416  PMID: 18728231
13.  Common Variation in the LMNA Gene (Encoding Lamin A/C) and Type 2 Diabetes 
Diabetes  2007;56(3):879-883.
Mutations in the LMNA gene (encoding lamin A/C) underlie familial partial lipodystrophy, a syndrome of monogenic insulin resistance and diabetes. LMNA maps to the well-replicated diabetes-linkage region on chromosome 1q, and there are reported associations between LMNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (particularly rs4641; H566H) and metabolic syndrome components. We examined the relationship between LMNA variation and type 2 diabetes (using six tag SNPs capturing >90% of common variation) in several large datasets. Analysis of 2,490 U.K. diabetic case and 2,556 control subjects revealed no significant associations at either genotype or haplotype level: the minor allele at rs4641 was no more frequent in case subjects (allelic odds ratio [OR] 1.07 [95% CI 0.98-1.17], P = 0.15). In 390 U.K. trios, family-based association analyses revealed nominally significant overtransmission of the major allele at rs12063564 (P = 0.01), which was not corroborated in other samples. Finally, genotypes for 2,817 additional subjects from the International 1q Consortium revealed no consistent case-control or family-based associations with LMNA variants. Across all our data, the OR for the rs4641 minor allele approached but did not attain significance (1.07 [0.99-1.15], P = 0.08). Our data do not therefore support a major effect of LMNA variation on diabetes risk. However, in a meta-analysis including other available data, there is evidence that rs4641 has a modest effect on diabetes susceptibility (1.10 [1.04-1.16], P = 0.001).
doi:10.2337/db06-0930
PMCID: PMC2672988  PMID: 17327460
14.  Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes 
Zeggini, Eleftheria | Scott, Laura J. | Saxena, Richa | Voight, Benjamin F. | Marchini, Jonathan L | Hu, Tainle | de Bakker, Paul IW | Abecasis, Gonçalo R | Almgren, Peter | Andersen, Gitte | Ardlie, Kristin | Boström, Kristina Bengtsson | Bergman, Richard N | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Borch-Johnsen, Knut | Burtt, Noël P | Chen, Hong | Chines, Peter S | Daly, Mark J | Deodhar, Parimal | Ding, Charles | Doney, Alex S F | Duren, William L | Elliott, Katherine S | Erdos, Michael R | Frayling, Timothy M | Freathy, Rachel M | Gianniny, Lauren | Grallert, Harald | Grarup, Niels | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Hansen, Torben | Herder, Christian | Hitman, Graham A | Hughes, Thomas E | Isomaa, Bo | Jackson, Anne U | Jørgensen, Torben | Kong, Augustine | Kubalanza, Kari | Kuruvilla, Finny G | Kuusisto, Johanna | Langenberg, Claudia | Lango, Hana | Lauritzen, Torsten | Li, Yun | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Marvelle, Amanda F | Meisinger, Christa | Midthjell, Kristian | Mohlke, Karen L | Morken, Mario A | Morris, Andrew D | Narisu, Narisu | Nilsson, Peter | Owen, Katharine R | Palmer, Colin NA | Payne, Felicity | Perry, John RB | Pettersen, Elin | Platou, Carl | Prokopenko, Inga | Qi, Lu | Qin, Li | Rayner, Nigel W | Rees, Matthew | Roix, Jeffrey J | Sandbæk, Anelli | Shields, Beverley | Sjögren, Marketa | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Stringham, Heather M | Swift, Amy J | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Timpson, Nicholas J | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Walker, Mark | Watanabe, Richard M | Weedon, Michael N | Willer, Cristen J | Illig, Thomas | Hveem, Kristian | Hu, Frank B | Laakso, Markku | Stefansson, Kari | Pedersen, Oluf | Wareham, Nicholas J | Barroso, Inês | Hattersley, Andrew T | Collins, Francis S | Groop, Leif | McCarthy, Mark I | Boehnke, Michael | Altshuler, David
Nature genetics  2008;40(5):638-645.
Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple new genomic loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)1-11. Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to discover loci at which common alleles have modest effects, we performed meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans encompassing 10,128 individuals of European-descent and ~2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed). Replication testing was performed in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. At least six new loci with robust evidence for association were detected, including the JAZF1 (p=5.0×10−14), CDC123/CAMK1D (p=1.2×10−10), TSPAN8/LGR5 (p=1.1×10−9), THADA (p=1.1×10−9), ADAMTS9 (p=1.2×10−8), and NOTCH2 (p=4.1×10−8) gene regions. The large number of loci with relatively small effects indicates the value of large discovery and follow-up samples in identifying additional clues about the inherited basis of T2D.
doi:10.1038/ng.120
PMCID: PMC2672416  PMID: 18372903
15.  Common variants in WFS1 confer risk of type 2 diabetes 
Nature genetics  2007;39(8):951-953.
We studied genes involved in pancreatic β cell function and survival, identifying associations between SNPs in WFS1 and diabetes risk in UK populations that we replicated in an Ashkenazi population and in additional UK studies. In a pooled analysis comprising 9,533 cases and 11,389 controls, SNPs in WFS1 were strongly associated with diabetes risk. Rare mutations in WFS1 cause Wolfram syndrome; using a gene-centric approach, we show that variation in WFS1 also predisposes to common type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.1038/ng2067
PMCID: PMC2672152  PMID: 17603484
16.  A Common Variant in the FTO Gene Is Associated with Body Mass Index and Predisposes to Childhood and Adult Obesity 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2007;316(5826):889-894.
Obesity is a serious international health problem that increases the risk of several common diseases. The genetic factors predisposing to obesity are poorly understood. A genome-wide search for type 2 diabetes–susceptibility genes identified a common variant in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) gene that predisposes to diabetes through an effect on body mass index (BMI). An additive association of the variant with BMI was replicated in 13 cohorts with 38,759 participants. The 16% of adults who are homozygous for the risk allele weighed about 3 kilograms more and had 1.67-fold increased odds of obesity when compared with those not inheriting a risk allele. This association was observed from age 7 years upward and reflects a specific increase in fat mass.
doi:10.1126/science.1141634
PMCID: PMC2646098  PMID: 17434869
17.  Combining Information from Common Type 2 Diabetes Risk Polymorphisms Improves Disease Prediction 
PLoS Medicine  2006;3(10):e374.
Background
A limited number of studies have assessed the risk of common diseases when combining information from several predisposing polymorphisms. In most cases, individual polymorphisms only moderately increase risk (~20%), and they are thought to be unhelpful in assessing individuals' risk clinically. The value of analyzing multiple alleles simultaneously is not well studied. This is often because, for any given disease, very few common risk alleles have been confirmed.
Methods and Findings
Three common variants (Lys23 of KCNJ11, Pro12 of PPARG, and the T allele at rs7903146 of TCF7L2) have been shown to predispose to type 2 diabetes mellitus across many large studies. Risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.30 to 0.88 in controls. To assess the combined effect of multiple susceptibility alleles, we genotyped these variants in a large case-control study (3,668 controls versus 2,409 cases). Individual allele odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 1.23) to 1.48 (95% CI, 1.36 to 1.60). We found no evidence of gene-gene interaction, and the risks of multiple alleles were consistent with a multiplicative model. Each additional risk allele increased the odds of type 2 diabetes by 1.28 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.35) times. Participants with all six risk alleles had an OR of 5.71 (95% CI, 1.15 to 28.3) compared to those with no risk alleles. The 8.1% of participants that were double-homozygous for the risk alleles at TCF7L2 and Pro12Ala had an OR of 3.16 (95% CI, 2.22 to 4.50), compared to 4.3% with no TCF7L2 risk alleles and either no or one Glu23Lys or Pro12Ala risk alleles.
Conclusions
Combining information from several known common risk polymorphisms allows the identification of population subgroups with markedly differing risks of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those obtained using single polymorphisms. This approach may have a role in future preventative measures for common, polygenic diseases.
Combining information from several known common risk polymorphisms allows the identification of subgroups of the population with markedly differing risks of developing type 2 diabetes.
Editors' Summary
Background.
Diabetes is an important and increasingly common global health problem; the World Health Organization has estimated that about 170 million people currently have diabetes worldwide. One particular form, type 2 diabetes, develops when cells in the body become unable to respond to a hormone called insulin. Insulin is normally released by the pancreas and controls the ability of body cells to take in glucose (sugar). Therefore, when cells become insensitive to insulin as in people with type 2 diabetes, glucose levels in the body are not well controlled and may become dangerously high in the blood. These high levels can have long-term damaging effects on various organs in the body, particularly the eyes, nerves, heart, and kidneys. There are many different factors that affect whether someone is likely to develop type 2 diabetes. These factors can be broadly grouped into two categories: environmental and genetic. Environmental factors such as obesity, a diet high in sugar, and a sedentary lifestyle are all risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes in later life. Genetically, a number of variants in many different genes may affect the risk of developing the disease. Generally, these gene variants are common in human populations but each gene variant only mildly increases the risk that a person possessing it will get type 2 diabetes.
Why Was This Study Done?
The investigators performing this study wanted to understand how different gene variants combine to affect an individual's risk of getting type 2 diabetes. That is, if a person carries many different variants, does their overall risk increase a lot or only a little?
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
First, the researchers surveyed the published reports to identify those gene variants for which there was strong evidence of an association with type 2 diabetes. They found mutations in three genes that had been shown reproducibly to be associated with type 2 diabetes in different studies: PPARG (whose product is involved in regulation of fat tissue), KCNJ11 (whose product is involved in insulin production), and TCF7L2 (whose product is thought to be involved in controlling sugar levels). Then, they compared two groups of white people in the UK: 2,409 people with type 2 diabetes (“cases”), and 3,668 people from the general population (“controls”). The researchers compared the two groups to see which individuals possessed which gene variants, and did statistical testing to work out to what extent having particular combinations of the gene variants affected an individual's chance of being a “case” versus a “control.” Their results showed that in the groups studied, having an ever-increasing number of gene variants increased the risk of developing diabetes. The risk that someone with none of the gene variants would develop type 2 diabetes was about 2%, while the chance for someone with all gene variants was about10%.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These results show that the risk of developing type 2 diabetes is greater if an individual possesses all of the gene variants that were examined in this study. The analysis also suggests that using information on all three variants, rather than just one, is likely to be more accurate in predicting future risk. How this genetic information should be used alongside other well-known preventative measures such as altered lifestyle requires further study.
Additional Information.
Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030374.
NHS Direct patient information on diabetes
National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse information on type 2 diabetes
World Health Organization Diabetes Programme
Centers for Disease ControlDiabetes Public Health Resource
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0030374
PMCID: PMC1584415  PMID: 17020404
18.  The functional "KL-VS" variant of KLOTHO is not associated with type 2 diabetes in 5028 UK Caucasians 
BMC Medical Genetics  2006;7:51.
Background
Klotho has an important role in insulin signalling and the development of ageing-like phenotypes in mice. The common functional "KL-VS" variant in the KLOTHO (KL) gene is associated with longevity in humans but its role in type 2 diabetes is not known. We performed a large case-control and family-based study to test the hypothesis that KL-VS is associated with type 2 diabetes in a UK Caucasian population.
Methods
We genotyped 1793 cases, 1619 controls and 1616 subjects from 509 families for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) F352V (rs9536314) that defines the KL-VS variant. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls. Family-based analysis was used to test for over- or under-transmission of V352 to affected offspring.
Results
Despite good power to detect odds ratios of 1.2, there were no significant associations between alleles or genotypes and type 2 diabetes (V352 allele: odds ratio = 0.96 (0.84–1.09)). Additional analysis of quantitative trait data in 1177 healthy control subjects showed no association of the variant with fasting insulin, glucose, triglycerides, HDL- or LDL-cholesterol (all P > 0.05). However, the HDL-cholesterol levels observed across the genotype groups showed a similar, but non-significant, pattern to previously reported data.
Conclusion
This is the first large-scale study to examine the association between common functional variation in KL and type 2 diabetes risk. We have found no evidence that the functional KL-VS variant is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in a large UK Caucasian case-control and family-based study.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-7-51
PMCID: PMC1534014  PMID: 16753056

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