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author:("wander, Klaus")
1.  Molecular Self-Assembly at Metal-Electrolyte Interfaces 
The self-assembly of molecular layers has become an important strategy in modern design of functional materials. However, in particular, large organic molecules may no longer be sufficiently volatile to be deposited by vapor deposition. In this case, deposition from solution may be a promising route; in ionic form, these molecules may even be soluble in water. In this contribution, we present and discuss results on the electrochemical deposition of viologen- and porphyrin molecules as well as their co-adsorption on chloride modified Cu(100) and Cu(111) single crystal electrode surfaces from aqueous acidic solutions. Using in situ techniques like cyclic voltametry and high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, as well as ex-situ photoelectron spectroscopy data the highly ordered self-assembled organic layers are characterized with respect to their electrochemical behavior, lateral order and inner conformation as well as phase transitions thereof as a function of their redox-state and the symmetry of the substrate. As a result, detailed structure models are derived and are discussed in terms of the prevailing interactions.
doi:10.3390/ijms14034498
PMCID: PMC3634441  PMID: 23439555
self-assembly; porphyrin; viologen; cyclic voltammogram; scanning tunneling microscopy; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
2.  Recrystallization of tubules from natural lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) wax on a Au(111) surface 
Summary
We present here the first results on the self-assembly of tubules of natural wax from lotus leaves on a single crystal Au(111) surface. A comparison of the tubule growth on Au(111) to that on HOPG is discussed. Although the tubule formation on both Au(111) and HOPG takes place on an intermediate wax film which should mask the substrate properties, the tubule orientations differ. In contrast to a vertical tubule orientation on HOPG, the tubules lie flat on Au(111). Taking into account the physical properties of HOPG and Au(111), we put forward a hypothesis which can explain the different tubule orientations on both substrates.
doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.30
PMCID: PMC3148047  PMID: 21977438
AFM; Au(111); lotus wax

Results 1-2 (2)