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1.  The BTB-zinc Finger Transcription Factor Abrupt Acts as an Epithelial Oncogene in Drosophila melanogaster through Maintaining a Progenitor-like Cell State 
PLoS Genetics  2013;9(7):e1003627.
The capacity of tumour cells to maintain continual overgrowth potential has been linked to the commandeering of normal self-renewal pathways. Using an epithelial cancer model in Drosophila melanogaster, we carried out an overexpression screen for oncogenes capable of cooperating with the loss of the epithelial apico-basal cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib), and identified the cell fate regulator, Abrupt, a BTB-zinc finger protein. Abrupt overexpression alone is insufficient to transform cells, but in cooperation with scrib loss of function, Abrupt promotes the formation of massive tumours in the eye/antennal disc. The steroid hormone receptor coactivator, Taiman (a homologue of SRC3/AIB1), is known to associate with Abrupt, and Taiman overexpression also drives tumour formation in cooperation with the loss of Scrib. Expression arrays and ChIP-Seq indicates that Abrupt overexpression represses a large number of genes, including steroid hormone-response genes and multiple cell fate regulators, thereby maintaining cells within an epithelial progenitor-like state. The progenitor-like state is characterised by the failure to express the conserved Eyes absent/Dachshund regulatory complex in the eye disc, and in the antennal disc by the failure to express cell fate regulators that define the temporal elaboration of the appendage along the proximo-distal axis downstream of Distalless. Loss of scrib promotes cooperation with Abrupt through impaired Hippo signalling, which is required and sufficient for cooperative overgrowth with Abrupt, and JNK (Jun kinase) signalling, which is required for tumour cell migration/invasion but not overgrowth. These results thus identify a novel cooperating oncogene, identify mammalian family members of which are also known oncogenes, and demonstrate that epithelial tumours in Drosophila can be characterised by the maintenance of a progenitor-like state.
Author Summary
Cancer is a multigenic process, involving cooperative interactions between oncogenes or tumour suppressors. In this study, in a genetic screen in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, for genes that cooperate with a mutation in the cell polarity (shape) regulator, scribbled (scrib), we identify a novel cooperative oncogene, abrupt. Expression of abrupt in scrib mutant tissue in the developing eye/antennal epithelium results in overgrown invasive tumours. abrupt encodes a BTB-zinc finger transcription factor, which has homology to several cancer-causing proteins in humans, such as BCL6. Analysis of the Abrupt targets and misexpressed genes in abrupt expressing-tissue and abrupt-expressing scrib mutant tumours, revealed cell fate regulators as a major class of targets. Thus, our results reveal that deregulation of multiple cell fate factors by Abrupt expression in the context of polarity disruption is associated with a progenitor-like cell state and the formation of overgrown invasive tumours. Our findings suggest that defective polarity may also be a critical factor in BTB-zinc finger-driven human cancers, and warrants further investigation into this issue.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1003627
PMCID: PMC3715428  PMID: 23874226
2.  Integrin-Dependent Activation of the JNK Signaling Pathway by Mechanical Stress 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(12):e26182.
Mechanical force is known to modulate the activity of the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling cascade. However, the effect of mechanical stresses on JNK signaling activation has previously only been analyzed by in vitro detection methods. It still remains unknown how living cells activate the JNK signaling cascade in response to mechanical stress and what its functions are in stretched cells.
We assessed in real-time the activity of the JNK pathway in Drosophila cells by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), using an intramolecular phosphorylation-dependent dJun-FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) biosensor. We found that quantitative FRET-FLIM analysis and confocal microscopy revealed sustained dJun-FRET biosensor activation and stable morphology changes in response to mechanical stretch for Drosophila S2R+ cells. Further, these cells plated on different substrates showed distinct levels of JNK activity that associate with differences in cell morphology, integrin expression and focal adhesion organization.
These data imply that alterations in the cytoskeleton and matrix attachments may act as regulators of JNK signaling, and that JNK activity might feed back to modulate the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion. We found that this dynamic system is highly plastic; at rest, integrins at focal adhesions and talin are key factors suppressing JNK activity, while multidirectional static stretch leads to integrin-dependent, and probably talin-independent, Jun sensor activation. Further, our data suggest that JNK activity has to coordinate with other signaling elements for the regulation of the cytoskeleton and cell shape remodeling associated with stretch.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0026182
PMCID: PMC3236745  PMID: 22180774
3.  Phosphorylation Networks Regulating JNK Activity in Diverse Genetic Backgrounds 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2008;322(5900):453-456.
Cellular signaling networks have evolved to enable swift and accurate responses, even in the face of genetic or environmental perturbation. Thus, genetic screens may not identify all the genes that regulate different biological processes. Moreover, although classical screening approaches have succeeded in providing parts lists of the essential components of signaling networks, they typically do not provide much insight into the hierarchical and functional relations that exist among these components. We describe a high-throughput screen in which we used RNA interference to systematically inhibit two genes simultaneously in 17,724 combinations to identify regulators of Drosophila JUN NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Using both genetic and phosphoproteomics data, we then implemented an integrative network algorithm to construct a JNK phosphorylation network, which provides structural and mechanistic insights into the systems architecture of JNK signaling.
doi:10.1126/science.1158739
PMCID: PMC2581798  PMID: 18927396

Results 1-3 (3)