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1.  The Prevalence of HLA–B27 in the US: Data From the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009 
Arthritis and rheumatism  2012;64(5):1407-1411.
Objective
To carry out the first large-scale population study of the prevalence of HLA–B27 in the US, which is needed for public health planning purposes because of recent improvements in medical therapy and diagnostic testing for ankylosing spondylitis (AS).
Methods
The national prevalence of HLA–B27 was determined as part of the 2009 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a cross-sectional survey monitoring the health and nutritional status of the US civilian, noninstitutionalized population. DNA polymerase chain reaction analysis was conducted in samples from 2,320 adults ages 20–69 years from this nationally representative sample.
Results
The age-adjusted US prevalence of B27 was 6.1% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4.6–8.2). By race/ethnicity, the prevalence of B27 was 7.5% (95% CI 5.3–10.4) among non-Hispanic whites and 3.5% (95% CI 2.5–4.8) among all other US races/ethnicities combined. In Mexican Americans, the prevalence was 4.6% (95% CI 3.4–6.1). The prevalence of B27 could not be reliably estimated for other US racial/ethnic groups because of the low number of B27-positive individuals in those groups. For adults 50–69 years of age, the prevalence of B27 was 3.6% (95% CI 2.2–5.8), which suggested a decrease in B27 with age. These prevalence estimates took into account the NHANES survey design and are reviewed with respect to data from the medical literature.
Conclusion
Our findings provide the first US national prevalence estimates for HLA–B27. A decline in the prevalence of HLA–B27 with age is suggested by these data but must be confirmed by additional studies.
doi:10.1002/art.33503
PMCID: PMC4038331  PMID: 22139851
2.  Is Familial Lupus Different from Sporadic Lupus?: Data from LUMINA, a Multiethnic US Cohort 
Lupus  2010;19(11):1331-1336.
Purpose
To characterize the clinical features of familial lupus, and determine its influence on damage accrual and survival using data from LUMINA, a longitudinal multiethnic US cohort.
Method
Familial lupus was defined as patients with a first degree relative with SLE. Relative risks were estimated by logistic regression; odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were the measure of association for familial lupus. Hazard Ratios (HR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazard adjusted for potential confounders for damage and survival.
Results
Thirty-two of 644 patients had familial and 612 had sporadic lupus; both groups were of comparable age (~ 36 years). Familial lupus patients were in decreasing order of frequency siblings, parents and children. In multivariable analyses, mucosal ulcers (OR=1.92, 95% CI 0.65–5.70), mitral valve prolapse (OR=1.74, 95% CI 0.50–6.10), cerebrovascular disease (OR=4.18, 95% CI 0.98–17.76) and oral contraceptive use (ever/never; OR=2.51, 95% CI 0.88–7.19) were more likely in familial lupus but a history of low platelet count (<150,000/mm3; OR=0.31, 95% CI 0.08–1.17) and pulmonary disease activity (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.14–1.20) were less likely. However, none of these associations reached statistical significance. Familial lupus was not significantly associated with a shorter time to either damage accrual or death (HR=0.77, 95% CI 0.37–1.59, p = 0.4746 and HR=0.20, 95% CI 0.03–1.47, p = 0.2020, respectively).
Conclusions
Although some clinical differences were observed in patients with familial and sporadic lupus, familial lupus was not associated with a significantly greater disease burden (damage, survival) than sporadic lupus.
doi:10.1177/0961203310375264
PMCID: PMC4078734  PMID: 20696771
familial lupus; lupus; sporadic lupus; LUMINA; multiethnic cohort
3.  Does C-Reactive Protein Predict the Long-Term Progression of Interstitial Lung Disease and Survival in Patients With Early Systemic Sclerosis? 
Arthritis care & research  2013;65(8):10.1002/acr.21968.
Objective
There are no identified clinical markers that reliably predict long-term progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma). Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels have been reported in SSc patients. We examined the predictive significance of CRP level for long-term ILD progression in a large early SSc cohort.
Methods
First, the CRP levels were compared between baseline samples of 266 SSc patients enrolled in the Genetics Versus Environment in Scleroderma Outcome Study cohort and 97 unaffected matched controls. Subsequently, the correlation between CRP levels and concomitantly obtained markers of disease severity was assessed. Serially obtained % predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) was used to examine the long-term ILD progression. The predictive significance of CRP level was investigated by a joint analysis of longitudinal measurements (serial FVCs up to 13 years) and survival data. This approach allowed inclusion of all 1,016 FVC measurements and accounted for survival dependency.
Results
We confirmed that baseline CRP levels were higher in SSc patients than controls. CRP levels were associated with absence of anticentromere antibodies and correlated with the concomitant severity of lung, skin, and joint involvement. More importantly, higher baseline CRP levels were associated with shorter survival (P < 0.001) and predicted the long-term decline in FVC independent of potential confounders (age at baseline, sex, ethnicity, disease type, current smoking, body mass index, topoisomerase status, and treatment with immunosuppressive agents) in the multivariable model (P = 0.006).
Conclusion
Baseline CRP levels are predictive of long-term ILD progression. CRP level might aid clinicians in identifying patients that require more intensive monitoring and treatment.
doi:10.1002/acr.21968
PMCID: PMC3816494  PMID: 23401350
4.  Allelic Dependent Expression of an Activating Fc receptor on B cells Enhances Humoral Immune Responses 
Science translational medicine  2013;5(216):216ra175.
B cells are pivotal regulators of acquired immune responses and recent work in both experimental murine models and humans has demonstrated that subtle changes in the regulation of B cell function can significantly alter immunological responses. The balance of negative and positive signals in maintaining an appropriate B cell activation threshold is critical in B lymphocyte immune tolerance and autoreactivity. FcγRIIb (CD32B), the only recognized Fcγ receptor on B cells, provides IgG-mediated negative modulation through a tyrosine-based inhibition motif which down-regulates B cell receptor initiated signaling. These properties make FcγRIIb a promising target for antibody-based therapy. Here we report the discovery of allele-dependent expression of the activating FcγRIIc on B cells. Identical to FcγRIIb in the extracellular domain, FcγRIIc has a tyrosine-based activation motif in its cytoplasmic domain. In both human B cells and in B cells from mice transgenic for human FcγRIIc, FcγRIIc expression counterbalances the negative feedback of FcγRIIb and enhances humoral responses to immunization in mice and to BioThrax® vaccination in a human Anthrax vaccine trial. Moreover, the FCGR2C-ORF allele is associated with the risk of development of autoimmunity in humans. FcγRIIc expression on B cells challenges the prevailing paradigm of uni-directional negative feedback by IgG immune complexes via the inhibitory FcγRIIb, is a previously unrecognized determinant in human antibody/autoantibody responses, and opens the opportunity for more precise personalized use of B cell targeted antibody-based therapy.
doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3007097
PMCID: PMC3982386  PMID: 24353158
5.  Association between Copy Number Variations HLA-DQA1 and Ankylosing Spondylitis in Chinese Han population 
Genes and immunity  2013;14(8):10.1038/gene.2013.46.
Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease with complex genetic traits. Multiple sequence variations have been associated with AS, but explained only a proportion of heritability. The studies herein aimed to explore potential associations between genomic copy number variation (CNV) and AS of Han Chinese. Five AS patients were examined with the high-density comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarrays in the first screen test for AS associated CNVs. A total of 533 AS patients and 792 unrelated controls were examined in confirmation studies with the AccuCopy assays. A significant association was observed between the CNV of the HLA-DQA1 and AS. Comparing with controls, AS patients showed an aberrant copy number (CN), and significantly increased number of patients had more than 2 copies of the HLA-DQA1. Therefore, CNV of the HLA-DQA1 may play an important role in susceptibility to AS in Han Chinese population.
doi:10.1038/gene.2013.46
PMCID: PMC3855587  PMID: 24048351
6.  Prevalence of Axial Spondylarthritis in the United States: Estimates From a Cross-Sectional Survey 
Arthritis care & research  2012;64(6):905-910.
Objective
The US national prevalence of spondylarthritis (SpA) was estimated for 2 published sets of classification criteria: the Amor criteria and the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria. These 2 SpA criteria sets have been the most widely utilized in previous population-based studies of SpA.
Methods
The US SpA prevalence estimates were based on a representative sample of 5,013 US adults ages 20 – 69 years who were examined in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009–2010.
Results
The overall age-adjusted prevalence of definite and probable SpA by the Amor criteria was 0.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.7–1.1%), corresponding to an estimated 1.7 million persons (95% CI 1.4–2.1 million persons). The age-adjusted prevalence of SpA by the ESSG criteria was 1.4% (95% CI 1.0–1.9%), corresponding to an estimated 2.7 million persons (95% CI 1.9–3.7 million persons). There were no statistically significant sex differences in SpA prevalence. The SpA prevalence among non-Hispanic white persons was 1.0% (95% CI 0.7–1.5%) by the Amor criteria and 1.5% (95% CI 1.0–2.3%) by the ESSG criteria. SpA prevalence could not be reliably estimated in other race/ethnicity subgroups due to sample size imitations.
Conclusion
The SpA prevalence estimates are in the range of SpA prevalence estimates reported elsewhere in population-based surveys and it is likely that SpA may affect up to 1% of US adults, a prevalence similar to that reported for rheumatoid arthritis. The current US SpA prevalence estimates may be lower than the true value because the NHANES 2009–2010 data collection did not capture a complete set of the elements specified in the 2 SpA criteria sets.
doi:10.1002/acr.21621
PMCID: PMC4032290  PMID: 22275150
7.  A registry of ankylosing spondylitis registries and prospects for global interfacing 
Current opinion in rheumatology  2013;25(4):468-476.
Purpose of review
To review the optimal criteria and conditions for establishing a clinical registry, as well as detailing their application in a number of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) Registries already in existence.
Recent findings
Recent genetic studies and studies of long-term treatment efficacy and side-effects have underscored the need for large numbers of patients, much larger than would be possible from a single center or consortium. An optimal Registry should have its aims established upfront, with appropriate governance and oversight, and inclusion and exclusion criteria for participating collaborators and subject defined. Collaborators contributing subjects to a Registry should use validated instruments for which they have been previously trained. The numerous cross-sectional and longitudinal Registries on AS and axSpA have been recently established that differ widely depending on the referral and selection issues.
Summary
The challenge of large-scale examinations of genetics, comorbidities, medication usage, and side-effects in spondyloarthritis underscores the need for combining data from well characterized registries of AS patients which require careful planning. There are currently many such registries available internationally, offering promise for collaborations and data pooling that can answer some of the pressing questions facing rheumatology clinicians and researchers.
doi:10.1097/BOR.0b013e3283620e1d
PMCID: PMC3758684  PMID: 23656716
genetics; patient cohorts; registries; spondyloarthritis; treatment outcome
8.  The Impact of TNF-inhibitors on radiographic progression in Ankylosing Spondylitis 
Arthritis and rheumatism  2013;65(10):2645-2654.
Introduction
We studied the effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha (TNF)-inhibitors on progressive spine damage in Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) patients.
Methods
All AS patients (satisfying the modified New York criteria) prospectively followed and with at least two sets of spinal radiographs at a minimum gap of 1.5 years were included (n=334). Patients received clinical standard of care, which included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TNF-inhibitors. Radiographic severity was assessed by the modified Stokes Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Patients with a rate of progression more than 1 mSASSS unit/year were considered progressors. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were done. Propensity score matching (PSM) and sensitivity analysis were performed. A zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) model was used to analyze the effect of TNF-inhibitor on change in mSASSS with varying follow-up periods. Potential confounders like Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), ESR, CRP, HLA-B27, gender, age of onset, smoking and baseline damage were included in the model.
Results
TNF-inhibitor treatment was associated with a 50% reduction in the odds of progression (OR: 0.52; CI: 0.30-0.88; p=0.02). Patients with a delay in starting therapy of more than 10 years were more likely to progress compared to those who started earlier (OR=2.4; 95% CI: 1.09-5.3; p=0.03). In the ZINB model TNF-inhibitor use significantly reduced progression when the gap between x-rays was more than 3.9 years. The protective effect of TNF-inhibitors was stronger after propensity score matching.
Conclusions
TNF-inhibitors appear to reduce radiographic progression in AS, especially with early initiation and longer duration of follow up.
doi:10.1002/art.38070
PMCID: PMC3974160  PMID: 23818109
9.  Predictors of the Rate of Change in Disease Activity over Time in LUMINA, a Multiethnic US Cohort of Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: LUMINA LXX 
Lupus  2010;19(6):727-733.
The objectives of the present study were (1) to clarify and quantify the relationship between age and disease duration with the rate of change in disease activity over time in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and (2) to explore other possible factors associated with this rate of change. To this end, SLE patients from LUMINA were studied if they had ≥3 visits in which disease activity (Systemic Lupus Activity Measure-Revised or SLAM-R) had been ascertained. Variables associated with the rate (slope) of change in disease activity (obtained by regressing the SLAM-R scores against the length of time from diagnosis to last visit) were examined by univariable and multivariable analyses. Five-hundred forty-two of the 632 patients had ≥3 SLAM-R scores. In multivariable analyses Caucasians exhibited the fastest decline in disease activity; Texan Hispanics exhibited the slowest, trailed by the African Americans. Longer disease duration and HLA-DRB1*1503 positivity were associated with a slower decline whereas a greater number of ACR criteria and abnormal laboratory parameters (white blood cell and platelet counts, hematocrit and serum creatinine) were associated with a faster decline. These findings complement existing knowledge on SLE disease activity and are potentially useful to clinicians managing these patients.
doi:10.1177/0961203309359289
PMCID: PMC3964002  PMID: 20118158
Lupus; disease activity; rate of change; ethnicity; cohort
10.  The prevalence of inflammatory back pain: population-based estimates from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–10 
Annals of the rheumatic diseases  2012;72(3):369-373.
Objective
To estimate the current US inflammatory back pain (IBP) prevalence using four published case definitions.
Methods
Analysis of an IBP data collection instrument specifically designed for the 2009–10 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Subjects were 5103 US adults ages 20–69 with complete data. IBP prevalence as determined by Calin et al criteria, European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria, and Berlin criteria 8a and 7b.
Results
Age-adjusted US prevalence of IBP by Calin criteria was 5.0% (95% CI 4.2% to 5.8%). Prevalence of IBP was 5.6% (95% CI 4.7% to 6.5%) by ESSG criteria, and 5.8% (95% CI 5.2% to 6.4%) and 6.0% (95% CI 4.9% to 7.1%) by Berlin Criteria 8a and 7b, respectively. IBP prevalence did not differ significantly by age groups or between men and women. IBP prevalence was significantly lower among non-Hispanic black persons compared with non-Hispanic white persons for the Calin and ESSG IBP criteria. For the ESSG and Berlin 7b criteria, non-Hispanic white persons had significantly higher IBP prevalences compared with Mexican Americans.
Conclusions
IBP is associated with spondyloarthritis. Awareness of the prevalence of IBP may be useful for planning future epidemiological studies as well as development and validation of diagnostic and classification criteria for specific clinically defined diseases.
doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-201403
PMCID: PMC3954785  PMID: 22791746
11.  Economic Considerations of the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis 
Ankylosing spondylitis (AS)is associated with both significant direct and indirect costs,which vary by country, and have generally increased dramatically since the introduction of anti-TNF therapy. The cost-effectiveness of biologic agents is controversial, although cost-effectiveness studies need to consider the potential impact of anti-TNF treatments on work ability. Alternatives to reduce costs associated with biologics have been examined, including on-demand dosing and lower dose alternatives. Other treatment measures, such as total hip arthroplasty and physical therapy, are also effective in reducing pain and improving function in patients with AS, although the optimal type or combination of physical therapy treatment modalities, the optimal frequency and duration of treatment, and whether therapy is equally effective in stable disease and uncontrolled AS needs to be determined. No studies have examined differences in patient outcomes based on subspecialty care. Establishing an evidence base for these questions would help inform policy decisions to design the most cost-effective measures to treat AS.
doi:10.1097/MAJ.0b013e3182514093
PMCID: PMC3613240  PMID: 22543541
Spondyloarthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Psoriatic Arthritis; Economics; anti-TNF Treatment
12.  REGIONAL RADIOGRAPHIC DAMAGE AND FUNCTIONAL LIMITATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS: DIFFERENCES IN EARLY AND LATE DISEASE 
Arthritis care & research  2013;65(2):257-265.
Objective
Radiographic damage and functional limitations both increase with the duration of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We examined whether radiographic damage contributed more to functional limitations in late AS than in early AS, and if the strength of association varied with the anatomic region of damage.
Methods
In this cross-sectional study of 801 patients with AS, we examined associations of the lumbar modified Stoke AS Spine Score (mSASSS), cervical mSASSS, lumbar posterior fusion, cervical posterior fusion, and hip arthritis with the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI) and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ-S).
Results
Higher lumbar and cervical mSASSS were associated with more functional limitations, but there was an interaction between mSASSS and the duration of AS such that the strength of their association with functional limitations decreased with increasing duration of AS. Cervical posterior fusion was associated with worse functioning independent of mSASSS. Hip arthritis was significantly associated with functional limitations independent of measures of spinal damage. Among patients with AS ≥ 40 years, the number of comorbid conditions accounted for most of the variation in functioning. Results were similar for both the BASFI and HAQ-S.
Conclusions
Although both radiographic damage and functional limitations increase over time in AS, the relative contribution of radiographic damage to functional limitations is lower among patients with longstanding AS than early AS, suggesting patients may accommodate to limited flexibility. Damage in different skeletal regions impacts functioning over the duration of AS. Functional limitations due to comorbidity supervene in late AS.
doi:10.1002/acr.21821
PMCID: PMC3541454  PMID: 23042639
Ankylosing spondylitis; radiographic damage; functional limitations
13.  SNPs in VKORC1 are Risk Factors for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Asians 
Arthritis and rheumatism  2013;65(1):211-215.
OBJECTIVE
The increased risk of thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may be partially explained by interrelated genetic pathways for thrombosis and SLE. In a case-control analysis, we investigated whether 33 established and novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 20 genes involved in hemostasis pathways that have been associated with deep venous thrombosis in the general population were risk factors for SLE development among Asians.
METHODS
Patients in the discovery cohort were enrolled in one of two North American SLE cohorts. Patients in the replication cohort were enrolled in one of four Asian or two North American cohorts. SLE cases met American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. We first genotyped 263 Asian SLE and 357 healthy Asian control individuals for 33 SNPs using Luminex multiplex technology in the discovery phase, and then used Taqman and Immunochip assays to examine 5 SNPs in up to an additional 1496 cases and 993 controls in the Replication phase. SLE patients were compared to healthy controls for association with minor alleles in allelic models. Principal components analysis was used to control for intra-Asian ancestry in an analysis of the replication cohort.
RESULTS
Two genetic variants in the gene VKORC1, rs9934438 and rs9923231, were highly significant in both the discovery and replication cohorts: OR(disc) = 2.45 (p=2×10−9), OR(rep) = 1.53 (p=5×10−6) and OR(disc) = 2.40 (p=6×10−9), OR(rep) = 1.53 (p=5×10−6), respectively. These associations were significant in the replication cohort after adjustment for intra-Asian ancestry: rs9934438 OR(adj) = 1.34 (p=0.0029) and rs9923231 OR(adj) = 1.34 (p=0.0032).
CONCLUSION
Genetic variants in VKORC1, involved in vitamin K reduction and associated with DVT, are associated with SLE development in Asians. These results suggest intersecting genetic pathways for the development of SLE and thrombosis.
doi:10.1002/art.37751
PMCID: PMC3670944  PMID: 23124848
systemic lupus erythematosus; single nucleotide polymorphisms; genetic risk factors
14.  Interferon Inducible Chemokines Correlate with Disease Severity in Systemic Sclerosis 
Arthritis and rheumatism  2013;65(1):226-235.
Objective
To measure interferon (IFN) inducible chemokines in plasma of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and investigate their correlation with disease severity.
Methods
We examined the correlation of IFN-inducible chemokines, IFNγ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), IFN-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC/CXCL11), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) with the IFN gene expression signature. We generated an IFN-inducible chemokine score with the correlated chemokines, IP-10 and I-TAC and compared it in 266 SSc patients enrolled in the GENISOS cohort to that of 97 matched controls. Subsequently, the correlation between the baseline IFN-inducible chemokine score and markers of disease severity was assessed. Finally, the course of IFN-inducible chemokine score over time was examined.
Results
The plasma IFN-inducible chemokine score correlated with the IFN gene expression signature and this score was higher in SSc patients. It also was associated with the absence of anti–RNA polymerase III antibodies, presence of anti–U1 ribonucleoprotein antibodies (RNP), but not with disease duration, type, or other autoantibodies. The chemokine scores correlated with concomitantly obtained muscle, skin and lung components of the Medsger Severity Index, as well as, FVC, DLco, creatine kinase. Its association with disease severity was independent of anti-RNP or other potential confounders (age, gender, ethnicity, disease duration, and treatment with immunosuppressive agents). Finally, there was not a significant change in the IFN-inducible chemokine score over time.
Conclusions
The IFN-inducible chemokine score is a stable serological marker of more severe subtype of SSc and may be useful for risk stratification regardless of disease type or duration.
doi:10.1002/art.37742
PMCID: PMC3687352  PMID: 23055137
15.  Epidemiology of Spondyloarthritis in North America 
Many challenges have made it difficult to determine the prevalence of spondyloarthritis (SpA) in North America. They include the ethnic heterogeneity of the population, the lack of feasibility of applying current criteria (such as requirements for HLA-B27 testing and imaging studies such are pelvic radiographs and MRI scanning) and the transient nature of some SpA symptoms (ie, peripheral arthritis, enthesitis). Current estimates of the prevalence of SpA in the United States range between 0.2% and 0.5% for ankylosing spondylitis, 0.1% for psoriatic arthritis, 0.065% for enteropathic peripheral arthritis, between 0.05% and 0.25% for enteropathic axial arthritis, and an overall prevalence of SpA as high as over one percent. With newer population-based instruments becoming available, the availability of the widely validated European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria and the lower cost and greater feasibility of genetic testing, opportunities for true population-based studies of SpA are possible and will likely soon ensue.
doi:10.1097/MAJ.0b013e31820f8c99
PMCID: PMC3063892  PMID: 21430444
Epidemiology; ankylosing spondylitis; psoriatic arthritis; enteropathic arthritis; spondyloarthritis
17.  Time to Neuropsychiatric Damage Occurrence in LUMINA: A Multiethnic Lupus Cohort 
Lupus  2009;18(9):822-830.
The aims of this study were to examine the predictors of time-to-neuropsychiatric (NP) damage and its impact on mortality in 632 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) African American, Hispanic and Caucasian LUMINA patients, age ≥ 16 years and disease duration ≤ 5 years at baseline (T0). Time-to-NP damage and its impact on mortality were examined by Cox proportional hazards regressions. One-hundred eighty-five (29.3%) patients developed NP-damage over a mean (SD) disease duration of 5.6 (3.7) years. After adjusting for neuropsychiatric manifestations present, older age [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.02; 95% [Confidence interval (CI) 1.00–1.04)], Caucasian ethnicity (HR=1.87; 95% CI 1.22-2.87), disease activity over the disease course (HR=1.16; 95% CI 1.12–1.21), diabetes (HR=3.47; 95% CI 1.44–8.38) and abnormal illness-related behaviors (HR=1.05; 95% CI 1.02–1.08) were associated with a shorter time to NP-damage. Photosensitivity (HR=0.65; 95% CI 0.44–0.95), anemia (HR=0.56; 95% CI 0.31–0.98), Raynaud’s phenomenon (HR=0.49; 95% CI 0.34–0.72), a medium dose of prednisone (HR=0.56; 95% CI 0.35–0.92) and hydroxychloroquine use (HR=0.58; 95% CI 0.36–0.93) were associated with a longer time. NP-damage did not contribute to mortality. Older age, Caucasian ethnicity, disease activity and abnormal illness-related behaviors are associated with a shorter time-to-NP damage; hydroxychloroquine and a medium dose of prednisone with a longer time.
doi:10.1177/0961203309104392
PMCID: PMC3759150  PMID: 19578107
18.  Peripheral Vascular Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Data from LUMINA, a Large Multiethnic Cohort 
Lupus  2009;18(14):1303-1308.
Summary
To determine the factors associated with peripheral vascular damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and its impact on survival from LUMINA, a longitudinal multiethnic cohort. Peripheral vascular damage was defined by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) Damage Index (SDI). Factors associated with peripheral vascular damage were examined by univariable and multivariable logistic regression models and its impact on survival by a Cox multivariable regression. Thirty-four (5.3%) of 637 patients (90% women, mean [SD] age 36.5 [12.6] (16-87) years developed peripheral vascular damage. Age and the SDI (without peripheral vascular damage) were statistically significant (odds ratio [OR] =1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.08; p=0.0107 and OR=1.30, 95% CI 0.09-1.56; p=0.0043, respectively) in multivariable analyses. Azathioprine, warfarin and statins were also statistically significant, glucocorticoid use was borderline statistically significant (OR=1.03, 95% CI 0.10-1.06; p=0.0975). In the survival analysis, peripheral vascular damage was independenly associated with a diminished survival (Hazard Ratio =2.36; 95% CI 1.07-5.19; p=0.0334). In short, age was independently associated with peripheral vascular damage, but so was the presence of damage in others organs (ocular, neuropsychiatric, renal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, musculoskeletal and integument) and some medications (probably reflecting more severe disease). Peripheral vascular damage also negatively affected survival.
doi:10.1177/0961203309105877
PMCID: PMC3758688  PMID: 19850658
19.  Markers of intestinal inflammation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a pilot study 
Arthritis Research & Therapy  2012;14(6):R261.
Introduction
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are similar chronic inflammatory diseases whose definitive etiology is unknown. Following recent clinical and genetic evidence supporting an intertwined pathogenic relationship, we conducted a pilot study to measure fecal calprotectin (fCAL) and IBD-related serologies in AS patients.
Methods
Consecutive AS patients were recruited from a long-term prospectively collected longitudinal AS cohort at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Controls were recruited from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center employees or spouses of patients with AS. Sera were tested by ELISA for IBD-associated serologies (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody IgG and IgA, anti-I2, anti-OmpC, and anti-CBir1). The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index were completed for AS patients.
Results
A total of 81 subjects (39 AS patients and 42 controls) were included for analysis. The average age of AS patients was 47 years and the average disease duration was 22 years. AS patients were predominantly male; 76% were HLA-B27-positive. Median fCAL levels were 42 μg/g and 17 μg/g in the AS group and controls, respectively (P < 0.001). When using the manufacturer's recommended cutoff value for positivity of 50 μg/g, stool samples of 41% of AS patients and 10% of controls were positive for fCAL (P = 0.0016). With the exception of ANCA, there were no significant differences in antibody levels between patients and controls. Median ANCA was 6.9 ELISA units in AS patients and 4.3 ELISA units in the controls. Among AS patients stratified by fCAL level, there were statistically significant differences between patients and controls for multiple IBD-associated antibodies.
Conclusion
Calprotectin levels were elevated in 41% of patients with AS with a cutoff value for positivity of 50 μg/g. fCAL-positive AS patients displayed higher medians of most IBD-specific antibodies when compared with healthy controls or fCAL-negative AS patients. Further studies are needed to determine whether fCAL can be used to identify and characterize a subgroup of AS patients whose disease might be driven by subclinical bowel inflammation.
doi:10.1186/ar4106
PMCID: PMC3674603  PMID: 23194008
20.  Electronic Monitoring of Oral Therapies in Ethnically Diverse and Economically Disadvantaged Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Consequences of Low Adherence 
Arthritis and rheumatism  2013;65(6):1421-1429.
Background
To quantify adherence to oral therapies in ethnically diverse and economically disadvantaged patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using electronic medication monitoring, and to evaluate the clinical consequences of low adherence.
Methods
107 patients with RA enrolled in a 2-year prospective cohort study agreed to have their oral RA drug therapy intake electronically monitored, with the Medication Events Monitoring System (MEMS®). Adherence to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and prednisone were determined as the percentage of days (or weeks for methotrexate) in which the patient took the correct dose as prescribed by the physician. Patient outcomes were assessed including the Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (MHAQ), the Disease Activity Index 28 (DAS28), quality of life and radiological damage using Sharp-van der Heijde scores.
Results
Adherence to the treatment regimen as determined by percent of correct doses was 64% for DMARDs and 70% for prednisone. Patients who had better mental health were statistically more likely to be adherent. Only 23 (21%) of the patients had an average adherence to DMARDs ≥ 80%. These patients showed significantly better disease activity scores across 2 years of follow-up than those who were less adherent (DAS28 3.3±1.3 vs. 4.1±1.2, p<0.02). Radiological scores were also worse in non-adherent patients at baseline and 12 months.
Conclusions
Only one fifth of the RA patients had an overall adherence of at least 80%. Less than two thirds of the prescribed DMARD doses were correctly taken. Adherent patients had lower disease activity and radiological damage scores across the 2 years of follow-up.
doi:10.1002/art.37917
PMCID: PMC3691007  PMID: 23728826
21.  Variable association of reactive intermediate genes with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in populations with different African ancestry 
The Journal of rheumatology  2013;40(6):842-849.
Objective
Little is known about the genetic etiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in individuals of African ancestry, despite its higher prevalence and greater disease severity. Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species are implicated in the pathogenesis and severity of SLE, making NO synthases and other reactive intermediate related genes biological candidates for disease susceptibility. This study analyzed variation in reactive intermediate genes for association with SLE in two populations with African ancestry.
Methods
A total of 244 SNPs from 53 regions were analyzed in non-Gullah African Americans (AA; 1432 cases and 1687 controls) and the genetically more homogeneous Gullah of the Sea Islands of South Carolina (133 cases and 112 controls) and. Single-marker, haplotype, and two-locus interaction tests were computed for these populations.
Results
The glutathione reductase gene GSR (rs2253409, P=0.0014, OR [95% CI]=1.26 [1.09–1.44]) was the most significant single-SNP association in AA. In the Gullah, the NADH dehydrogenase NDUFS4 (rs381575, P=0.0065, OR [95%CI]=2.10 [1.23–3.59]) and nitric oxide synthase gene NOS1 (rs561712, P=0.0072, OR [95%CI]=0.62 [0.44–0.88]) were most strongly associated with SLE. When both populations were analyzed together, GSR remained the most significant effect (rs2253409, P=0.00072, OR [95%CI]=1.26 [1.10–1.44]). Haplotype and two-locus interaction analyses also uncovered different loci in each population.
Conclusion
These results suggest distinct patterns of association with SLE in African-derived populations; specific loci may be more strongly associated within select population groups.
doi:10.3899/jrheum.120989
PMCID: PMC3735344  PMID: 23637325
systemic lupus erythematosus; African Americans; genetic association studies; oxygen compounds; single nucleotide polymorphism
22.  IRF5 polymorphism predicts prognosis in patients with systemic sclerosis 
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases  2012;71(7):1197-1202.
Objective
The first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of systemic sclerosis (SSc) demonstrated three non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) susceptibility loci. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of these gene variants on survival and severity of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in SSc.
Methods
The authors examined 1443 Caucasian SSc patients enrolled in the Genetics versus Environment In Scleroderma Outcome Study (GENISOS) and Scleroderma Family Registry (n = 914 – discovery cohort) and The Johns Hopkins Scleroderma Cohort (n = 529 – replication cohort). Forced vital capacity (FVC)% predicted was used as a surrogate for ILD severity. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms, IRF5 (rs10488631, rs12537284, rs4728142), STAT4 (rs3821236), CD247 (rs2056626) reached genome-wide significance in the SSc-GWAS and were examined in the current study.
Results
Overall, 15.5% of the patients had died over the follow-up period of 5.5 years. The IRF5 rs4728142 minor allele was predictive of longer survival in the discovery cohort (p = 0.021) and in the independent replication cohort (p = 0.047) and combined group (HR: 0.75, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.90, p = 0.002). The association of this SNP with survival was independent of age at disease onset, disease type and autoantibody profile (anticentromere and antitopoisomerase antibodies). The minor allele frequency of IRF5 rs4728142 was 49.4%.
Moreover, IRF5 rs4728142 minor allele correlated with higher FVC% predicted at enrolment (p = 0.019). Finally, the IRF5 rs4728142 minor allele was associated with lower IRF5 transcript expression in patients and controls (p = 0.016 and p = 0.034, respectively), suggesting that the IRF5, rs4728142 SNP, may be functionally relevant.
Conclusion
An SNP in the IRF5 promoter region (rs4728142), associated with lower IRF5 transcript levels, was predictive of longer survival and milder ILD in patients with SSc.
doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2011-200901
PMCID: PMC3375372  PMID: 22440820
23.  End-Stage Renal Disease in African Americans With Lupus Nephritis Is Associated With APOL1 
Objective
Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that exhibits familial aggregation and may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). LN is more prevalent among African Americans than among European Americans. This study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy risk alleles G1/G2, common in African Americans and rare in European Americans, contribute to the ethnic disparity in risk.
Methods
APOL1 G1 and G2 nephropathy alleles were genotyped in 855 African American SLE patients with LN-ESRD (cases) and 534 African American SLE patients without nephropathy (controls) and tested for association under a recessive genetic model, by logistic regression.
Results
Ninety percent of the SLE patients were female. The mean ± SD age at SLE diagnosis was significantly lower in LN-ESRD cases than in SLE non-nephropathy controls (27.3 ± 10.9 years versus 39.5 ± 12.2 years). The mean ± SD time from SLE diagnosis to development of LN-ESRD in cases was 7.3 ± 7.2 years. The G1/G2 risk alleles were strongly associated with SLE-ESRD, with 25% of cases and 12% of controls having 2 nephropathy alleles (odds ratio [OR] 2.57, recessive model P = 1.49 × 10−9), and after adjustment for age, sex, and ancestry admixture (OR 2.72, P = 6.23 × 10−6). The age-, sex-, and admixture-adjusted population attributable risk for ESRD among patients with G1/G2 polymorphisms was 0.26, compared to 0.003 among European American patients. The mean time from SLE diagnosis to ESRD development was ~2 years earlier among individuals with APOL1 risk genotypes (P = 0.01).
Conclusion
APOL1 G1/G2 alleles strongly impact the risk of LN-ESRD in African Americans, as well as the time to progression to ESRD. The high frequency of these alleles in African Americans with near absence in European Americans explains an important proportion of the increased risk of LN-ESRD in African Americans.
doi:10.1002/art.38220
PMCID: PMC4002759  PMID: 24504811
24.  Is there a higher genetic load of susceptibility loci in familial ankylosing spondylitis? 
Arthritis care & research  2012;64(5):780-784.
Objective
Several genetic risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have been identified in genome wide association studies. Our objective was to examine whether familial AS cases have a higher genetic load of these susceptibility variants.
Methods
Overall, 502 AS patients were examined, consisting of 312 who had first-degree relatives (FDR) with AS (familial) and 190 who had no FDR with AS or spondyloarthritis (sporadic). All patients and affected FDRs fulfilled the modified New York Criteria for AS. The patients were recruited from two U.S. cohorts (NASC and PSOAS) and from the United Kingdom- Oxford cohort. The frequencies of AS susceptibility loci in IL23R, IL1R2, ANTRX2, ERAP1, two intergenic regions on chromosomes 2p15 and 21q22, and HLA-B27 status as determined by the tag SNP rs4349859 were compared between familial and sporadic cases. Association between SNPs and multiplex status was assessed by logistic regression controlling for sibship size.
Results
HLA-B27 was significantly more prevalent in familial than sporadic cases of AS (p=0.0001, OR: 4.44, CI: (2.06–9.55)). Furthermore, the AS risk allele at chromosome 21q22 intergenic region showed a trend towards higher frequency in the multiplex cases (p=0.08). The frequency of the other AS risk variants did not differ significantly between familial and sporadic cases, either individually or combined.
Conclusions
HLA-B27 is more prevalent in familial than sporadic cases of AS, demonstrating higher familial aggregation of AS in patients with HLA-B27 positivity. The frequency of the recently described non-MHC susceptibility loci is not markedly different between the sporadic and familial cases of AS.
doi:10.1002/acr.21601
PMCID: PMC3335985  PMID: 22231927
25.  Association of Discoid Lupus with Clinical Manifestations and Damage Accrual in PROFILE: A Multiethnic Lupus Cohort 
Arthritis care & research  2012;64(5):704-712.
Objective
To determine the clinical manifestations and disease damage associated with discoid rash in a large multiethnic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) cohort.
Methods
SLE patients (per ACR criteria), age ≥ 16 years, disease duration ≤ 10 years at enrollment, and defined ethnicity (African American, Hispanic or Caucasian), from a longitudinal cohort were studied. Socioeconomic-demographic features, clinical manifestations and disease damage [as per the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index (SDI)] were determined. The association of DLE with clinical manifestations and disease damage was examined using multivariable logistic regression.
Results
A total of 2,228 SLE patients were studied. The mean (standard deviation, SD) age at diagnosis was 34.3 (12.8) years and the mean (SD) disease duration was 7.9 (6.0) years; 91.8% were women. Discoid lupus was observed in 393 (17.6%) of patients with SLE. In the multivariable analysis, patients with discoid lupus were more likely to be smokers and of African-American ethnicity, and to have malar rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcers, leukopenia and vasculitis. DLE patients were less likely to be of Hispanic (from Texas) ethnicity, and to have arthritis, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and antinuclear, anti-dsDNA and anti-phospholipid antibodies. Patients with DLE had more damage accrual, particularly chronic seizures, scarring alopecia, scarring of the skin, and skin ulcers.
Conclusion
In this cohort of SLE patients, discoid lupus was associated with several clinical features including serious manifestations such as vasculitis and chronic seizures.
doi:10.1002/acr.21581
PMCID: PMC3559016  PMID: 22190480
discoid rash; systemic lupus erythematosus; disease damage

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