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1.  Reduction of pain via platelet-rich plasma in split-thickness skin graft donor sites: a series of matched pairs 
Diabetic Foot & Ankle  2015;6:10.3402/dfa.v6.24972.
In the past decade, autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy has seen increasingly widespread integration into medical specialties. PRP application is known to accelerate wound epithelialization rates, and may also reduce postoperative wound site pain. Recently, we observed an increase in patient satisfaction following PRP gel (Angel, Cytomedix, Rockville, MD) application to split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor sites. We assessed all patients known to our university-based hospital service who underwent multiple STSGs up to the year 2014, with at least one treated with topical PRP. Based on these criteria, five patients aged 48.4±17.6 (80% male) were identified who could serve as their own control, with mean time of 4.4±5.1 years between operations. In both therapies, initial dressing changes occurred on postoperative day (POD) 7, with donor site pain measured by Likert visual pain scale. Paired t-tests compared the size and thickness of harvested skin graft and patient pain level, and STSG thickness and surface area were comparable between control and PRP interventions (p>0.05 for all). Donor site pain was reduced from an average of 7.2 (±2.6) to 3 (±3.7), an average reduction in pain of 4.2 (standard error 1.1, p=0.0098) following PRP use. Based on these results, the authors suggest PRP as a beneficial adjunct for reducing donor site pain following STSG harvest.
doi:10.3402/dfa.v6.24972
PMCID: PMC4306752  PMID: 25623477
skin grafts; platelet-rich plasma; diabetic foot; pain reduction
3.  Polymeric Endoaortic Paving (PEAP): Mechanical, Thermoforming, and Degradation Properties of Polycaprolactone/Polyurethane Blends for Cardiovascular Applications 
Acta biomaterialia  2010;7(1):287-294.
Polymeric endoaortic paving (PEAP) is a process by which a polymer is endovascularly delivered and thermoformed to coat or “pave” the lumen of the aorta. This method may offer an improvement to conventional endoaortic therapy in allowing conformal graft application with reduced risk of endoleak and customization to complex patient geometries. Polycaprolactone (PCL)/polyurethane (PU) blends of various blend ratios were assessed as a potential material for PEAP by characterizing their mechanical, thermoforming, and degradation properties. Biaxial tension testing revealed that the blends' stiffness is similar to that of aortic tissue, is higher for blends with more PCL content, and may be affected by thermoforming and degradation. Tubes of blends were able to maintain a higher diameter increase after thermoforming at higher PCL content and higher heating temperatures; 50/50 blend tubes heated to 55°C were able to maintain 90% of the diameter increase applied. Delamination forces of the blends ranged from 41 to 235 N/m2. In a Pseudomonas lipase solution, the 50/50 blend had a 94% lower degradation rate than pure PCL, and the 10/90 blend exhibited no degradation. These results indicate that PEAP, consisting of a PCL/PU blend, may be useful in developing the next generation of endoaortic therapy.
doi:10.1016/j.actbio.2010.09.004
PMCID: PMC2993111  PMID: 20832506
Polymeric Paving; Aneurysm; Polycaprolactone; Polyurethane; Vascular grafts
4.  A tale of two soles: sociomechanical and biomechanical considerations in diabetic limb salvage and amputation decision-making in the worst of times 
Diabetic Foot & Ankle  2012;3:10.3402/dfa.v3i0.18633.
Foot ulcerations complicated by infection are the major cause of limb loss in people with diabetes. This is especially true in those patients with severe sepsis. Determining whether to amputate or attempt to salvage a limb often requires in depth evaluation of each individual patient's physical, mental, and socioeconomic status. The current report presents and juxtaposes two similar patients, admitted to the same service at the same time with severe diabetic foot infections complicated by sepsis. We describe in detail the similarities and differences in the clinical presentation, extent of infection, etiology, and socioeconomic concerns that ultimately led to divergent clinical decisions regarding the choices of attempting diabetic limb salvage versus primary amputation and prompt rehabilitation.
doi:10.3402/dfa.v3i0.18633
PMCID: PMC3464045  PMID: 23050063
diabetic foot; Charcot arthropathy; diabetic limb salvage; diabetic foot infection; amputation
5.  Novel Use of Insulin in Continuous-Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy as “Wound Chemotherapy” 
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is frequently employed in the treatment of complex wounds. A variety of wound chemotherapeutic agents such as insulin, which acts as a growth factor, may prove helpful in treatment as well. We present a case report in which insulin was used as a chemotherapeutic agent in continuous-instillation NPWT. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature describing this method of delivery.
PMCID: PMC2909511  PMID: 20663443
diabetic foot ulcers; insulin; negative pressure wound therapy; wound chemotherapy
6.  FaceTime for Physicians: Using Real Time Mobile Phone–Based Videoconferencing to Augment Diagnosis and Care in Telemedicine 
Eplasty  2011;11:e23.
Objective/Background: Telemedicine has, even in its infancy, had an impact on the provision of healthcare, particularly in rural communities. However, this often relies on an expensive and ponderous infrastructure that reduces the rapid use and spontaneity for consultations. Methods: Using postoperative and intraoperative examples, we describe the use of one rapid and widely available technology (iPhone FaceTime, Cupertino, California). Results: The device, in allowing “one button connection” similar to making a phone call, reduced the need for preplanning that is generally required for real-time telemedicine consultation. Conclusions: The ability to communicate quickly with something that is an afterthought has the potential to alter how we work with our colleagues and patients. Just as with the iPod in music and the laptop in computing, it is not the change in technology, but the change in form factor and ubiquity that alters this landscape.
PMCID: PMC3087505  PMID: 21559249
7.  Wound Chemotherapy by the Use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy and Infusion 
Eplasty  2010;10:e9.
Introduction: Although the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is broadly efficacious, it may foster some potentially adverse complications. This is particularly true in patients with diabetes who have a wound colonized with aerobic organisms. Traditional antiseptics have been proven useful to combat such bacteria but require removal of some NPWT devices to be effective. Methods: In this article, we describe a method of “wound chemotherapy” by combining NPWT and a continuous infusion of Dakins' 0.5% solution either as a standardized technique in one device (ITI Sved) or as a modification of standard technique in another (KCI VAC) NPWT device. The twin goals of both techniques are to effectively reduce bacterial burden and to promote progressive wound healing. Results: We present several representative case examples of our provisional experience with continuous streaming therapy through 2 foam-based negative pressure devices. Discussion: Wound chemotherapy was successfully applied to patients with diabetes, without adverse reactions, complications, or recolonization during the course of treatment. We believe this to be a promising method to derive the benefits of NPWT without the frequent adverse sequela of wound colonization.
PMCID: PMC2806786  PMID: 20090841
9.  A Method of External Fixation to Offload and Protect the Foot Following Reconstruction in High-Risk Patients: The SALSAstand 
Eplasty  2009;9:e21.
Introduction: The course of wound healing in high-risk patients with diabetes, particularly those with peripheral arterial disease and renal failure, is often prolonged and fraught with complications. Traditional methods of offloading the posterior foot or holding correction in place following diabetic foot reconstruction include various padded and bolstering devices. Methods: In this article, we describe a method (SALSAstand) to effectively elevate, offload, and protect the foot with an external fixation device, while also promoting flap healing, maintaining tendon correction, and limiting the tendon retraction and contracture that is commonly seen following a foot-salvage procedure in high-risk patients. Results: Not applicable. Discussion: The SALSAstand device has been successfully utilized on many patients in our service to accomplish the aforementioned goals in this most challenging patient population.
PMCID: PMC2697004  PMID: 19578534
10.  The Diabetic Rapid Response Acute Foot Team: 7 Essential Skills for Targeted Limb Salvage 
Eplasty  2009;9:e15.
Objective: People with diabetes are prone to develop lower-extremity ulcerations and infections, both of which serve as major risk factors for limb amputation. The development of lower-extremity complications of diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the development of interdisciplinary teams to manage the myriad factors that complicate the treatment of high-risk patients, particularly in the perihospitalization period. Methods: This article presents 7 essential skills that necessarily allow the limb salvage team to appropriately manage the most common presenting comorbidities in patients with diabetes, including vasculopathy, infection, and deformity. Results: Seven essentials skills have been demonstrated to promote the greatest salvage outcomes, and these are the ability to (1) perform hemodynamic and anatomic vascular assessment with revascularization, as necessary; (2) perform neurologic workup; (3) perform site-appropriate culture technique; (4) perform wound assessment and staging/grading of infection and ischemia; (5) perform site-specific bedside and intraoperative incision and debridement; (6) initiate and modify culture-specific and patient-appropriate antibiotic therapy; and (7) perform appropriate postoperative monitoring to reduce risk of reulceration and infection. Conclusions: Utilization of these 7 essential skills as the core basis for interdisciplinary limb salvage team models will provide clinicians guidance when establishing such teams. Interdisciplinary teams have been demonstrated to improve quality and efficiency of patient care, thus improving overall outcomes and reducing amputation rates.
PMCID: PMC2680239  PMID: 19436764

Results 1-10 (10)