PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
1.  Novel Use of Platelet-Rich Plasma to Augment Curative Diabetic Foot Surgery 
Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may enhance wound healing through the formation of a platelet plug that provides both hemostasis and the secretion of biologically active proteins, including growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, TGF-β2, and epidermal growth factor. The release of these growth factors into the wound may create an environment more conducive to tissue repair and could accelerate postoperative wound healing. To our knowledge, there are no reports of combining the use of PRP with curative diabetic foot surgery. This article provides a summary of the literature regarding PRP and wound healing and presents a case of a 49-year-old man with diabetes and a three-month history of a deep, nonhealing plantar hallux wound in which PRP was combined with a first metatarsophalangeal joint arthroplasty. Through the use of the PRP and bioengineered tissue to supplement curative diabetic foot surgery, the patient healed uneventfully at seven weeks.
PMCID: PMC2956802  PMID: 20920431
diabetic; foot surgery; platelet rich plasma; wound
2.  Novel Use of Insulin in Continuous-Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy as “Wound Chemotherapy” 
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is frequently employed in the treatment of complex wounds. A variety of wound chemotherapeutic agents such as insulin, which acts as a growth factor, may prove helpful in treatment as well. We present a case report in which insulin was used as a chemotherapeutic agent in continuous-instillation NPWT. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature describing this method of delivery.
PMCID: PMC2909511  PMID: 20663443
diabetic foot ulcers; insulin; negative pressure wound therapy; wound chemotherapy
3.  Partial Calcanectomy in High-Risk Patients With Diabetes: Use and Utility of a “Hurricane” Incisional Approach 
Eplasty  2010;10:e17.
Introduction: Plantar heel ulcers in people with diabetes represent a difficult challenge to the treating physician. They become even more difficult with underlying osteomyelitis. When this infection is in the calcaneus it typically results in a partial or total calcanectomy or even more frequently, high-level amputation. Methods: In this article, we describe a novel serpentine incisional approach to the plantar and (if necessary) posterior heel allowing for ample exposure and facilitating closure predominantly along relaxed skin tension lines. Results: We present several representative case examples in which a hurricane incision has been used to treat and provide closure to plantar-based calcaneal ulcers. Discussion: The use of this incision, which resembles a satellite view of a hurricane, was successful in achieving a desired partial calcanectomy and wound closure. This may be an additional tool in the armamentarium of the surgeon to assist in healing and amputation prevention.
PMCID: PMC2817571  PMID: 20165545

Results 1-3 (3)