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1.  DIFFERENTIAL VULNERABILITY TO EARLY-LIFE PARENTAL DEATH: THE MODERATING EFFECTS OF FAMILY SUICIDE HISTORY ON RISKS FOR MAJOR DEPRESSION AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN LATER LIFE* 
Biodemography and social biology  2016;62(1):105-125.
Only a portion of those exposed to parental death in early life (PDE) develop behavioral health disorders. We utilized demographic pedigree data from the Utah Population Database to test for differential vulnerability to PDE by creating a risk score of familial susceptibility to suicide (FS) at the population level. Using logistic panel regression models, we tested for multiplicative interactions between PDE and FS on the risks of major depressive disorder (MDD) and substance abuse (SA), measured with Medicare claims, after age 65. The final sample included 155,983 individuals (born 1886 through 1944), yielding 1,431,060 person-years at risk (1992 through 2009). Net of several potential confounders, including probability of survival to age 65, for females we found an FS × PDE interaction, where PDE and FS as main effects had no impact but jointly they increased MDD risk. No statistically significant main or interactive effects were found for SA among females, or for either phenotype among males. Our findings are consistent with a differential vulnerability model for MDD in females, where early-life stress increases the risk for poor behavioral health only among the vulnerable. Furthermore we demonstrate how demographic and pedigree data might serve as tools for investigating differential vulnerability hypotheses.
doi:10.1080/19485565.2016.1138395
PMCID: PMC4929083  PMID: 27050036
Mental health; Biobehavioral health; Early origins of health; Genetics; Life course
2.  Whole exome sequencing in extended families with autism spectrum disorder implicates four candidate genes 
Human genetics  2015;134(10):1055-1068.
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders, characterized by impairment in communication and social interactions, and by repetitive behaviors. ASDs are highly heritable, and estimates of the number of risk loci range from hundreds to > 1000. We considered 7 extended families (size 12 – 47 individuals), each with ≥ 3 individuals affected by ASD. All individuals were genotyped with dense SNP panels. A small subset of each family was typed with whole exome sequence (WES). We used a 3-step approach for variant identification. First, we used family-specific parametric linkage analysis of the SNP data to identify regions of interest. Second, we filtered variants in these regions based on frequency and function, obtaining exactly 200 candidates. Third, we compared two approaches to narrowing this list further. We used information from the SNP data to impute exome variant dosages into those without WES. We regressed affected status on variant allele dosage, using pedigree-based kinship matrices to account for relationships. The p-value for the test of the null hypothesis that variant allele dosage is unrelated to phenotype was used to indicate strength of evidence supporting the variant. A cutoff of p=0.05 gave 28 variants. As an alternative third filter, we required Mendelian inheritance in those with WES, resulting in 70 variants. The imputation and association based approach was effective. We identified four strong candidate genes for ASD (SEZ6L, HISPPD1, FEZF1, SAMD11), all of which have been previously implicated in other studies, or have a strong biological argument for their relevance.
doi:10.1007/s00439-015-1585-y
PMCID: PMC4578871  PMID: 26204995
whole exome sequencing; imputation; family-based association; genome scan; pedigree
3.  VARPRISM: incorporating variant prioritization in tests of de novo mutation association 
Genome Medicine  2016;8(1):91.
Background
Patients with certain genetic diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder, have increased rates of de novo mutations within some protein-coding genes.
Results
We introduce the VARiant PRIoritization SuM (VARPRISM), a software package which incorporates functional variant prioritization information to improve the power to detect de novo mutations influencing disease risk. VARPRISM evaluates the consequence of any given exonic mutation on the protein sequence to estimate the likelihood that the mutation is benign or damaging and conducts a likelihood ratio test on the gene level. We analyzed the Simons Simplex Collection of 2508 parent-offspring autism trios using VARPRISM, replicating 44 genes previously implicated in autism susceptibility and identifying 20 additional candidate genes, including MYO1E, KCND3, PDCD1, DLX3, and TSPAN4 (false discovery rate < 0.3).
Conclusion
By incorporating functional predictions, VARPRISM improved the statistical power to identify de novo mutations increasing disease risks. VARPRISM is available at http://www.hufflab.org/software/VARPRISM.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13073-016-0341-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s13073-016-0341-9
PMCID: PMC4997702  PMID: 27562213
De novo mutations; Autism spectrum disorder; Simons Simplex Collection; Likelihood ratio test; Variant prioritization
4.  Head Circumference and Height in Autism 
Data from 10 sites of the NICHD/NIDCD Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism were combined to study the distribution of head circumference and relationship to demographic and clinical variables. Three hundred thirty-eight probands with autism-spectrum disorder (ASD) including 208 probands with autism were studied along with 147 parents, 149 siblings, and typically developing controls. ASDs were diagnosed, and head circumference and clinical variables measured in a standardized manner across all sites. All subjects with autism met ADI-R, ADOS-G, DSM-IV, and ICD-10 criteria. The results show the distribution of standardized head circumference in autism is normal in shape, and the mean, variance, and rate of macrocephaly but not microcephaly are increased. Head circumference tends to be large relative to height in autism. No site, gender, age, SES, verbal, or non-verbal IQ effects were present in the autism sample. In addition to autism itself, standardized height and average parental head circumference were the most important factors predicting head circumference in individuals with autism. Mean standardized head circumference and rates of macrocephaly were similar in probands with autism and their parents. Increased head circumference was associated with a higher (more severe) ADI-R social algorithm score. Macrocephaly is associated with delayed onset of language. Although mean head circumference and rates of macrocephaly are increased in autism, a high degree of variability is present, underscoring the complex clinical heterogeneity of the disorder. The wide distribution of head circumference in autism has major implications for genetic, neuroimaging, and other neurobiological research.
doi:10.1002/ajmg.a.31465
PMCID: PMC4899843  PMID: 17022081
autism; autism-spectrum disorder; head circumference; macrocephaly; height
5.  Spatial relative risk patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Utah 
Heightened areas of spatial relative risk for ASD, or ASD hotspots, in Utah were identified using adaptive kernel density functions. Children ages four, six and eight with ASD from multiple birth cohorts were identified by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities (URADD). Each ASD case was gender-matched to 20 birth cohort controls. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of children born inside versus outside ASD hotspots were compared. ASD hotspots were found in the surveillance area for all but one birth cohort and age group sample; maximum relative risk in these hotspots ranged from 1.8 to 3.0. Associations were found between higher socioeconomic status (SES) and birth residence in an ASD hotspot in five out of six birth cohort and age group samples.
doi:10.1007/s10803-014-2253-0
PMCID: PMC4379991  PMID: 25241009
ascertainment age; Autism Spectrum Disorders; diagnostic age; maternal residential birth address; socioeconomic status; spatial analysis; race/ethnicity
6.  Excess Mortality and Causes of Death in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Follow up of the 1980s Utah/UCLA Autism Epidemiologic Study 
This study’s purpose was to investigate mortality among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) ascertained during a 1980s statewide autism prevalence study (n = 305) in relation to controls. Twenty-nine of these individuals (9.5 %) died by the time of follow up, representing a hazard rate ratio of 9.9 (95 % CI 5.7–17.2) in relation to population controls. Death certificates identified respiratory, cardiac, and epileptic events as the most common causes of death. The elevated mortality risk associated with ASD in the study cohort appeared related to the presence of comorbid medical conditions and intellectual disability rather than ASD itself suggesting the importance of coordinated medical care for this high risk sub-population of individuals with ASD.
doi:10.1007/s10803-012-1664-z
PMCID: PMC4814267  PMID: 23008058
Autism spectrum disorders; Mortality; Causes of death; Epilepsy; Intellectual disability
7.  Acute Air Pollution Exposure and Risk of Suicide Completion 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2015;181(5):295-303.
Research into environmental factors associated with suicide has historically focused on meteorological variables. Recently, a heightened risk of suicide related to short-term exposure to airborne particulate matter was reported. Here, we examined the associations between short-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide and completed suicide in Salt Lake County, Utah (n = 1,546) from 2000 to 2010. We used a time-stratified case-crossover design to estimate adjusted odds ratios for the relationship between suicide and exposure to air pollutants on the day of the suicide and during the days preceding the suicide. We observed maximum heightened odds of suicide associated with interquartile-range increases in nitrogen dioxide during cumulative lag 3 (average of the 3 days preceding suicide; odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.39) and fine particulate matter (diameter ≤2.5 μm) on lag day 2 (day 2 before suicide; OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.10). Following stratification by season, an increased suicide risk was associated with exposure to nitrogen dioxide during the spring/fall transition period (OR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.66) and fine particulate matter in the spring (OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.61) during cumulative lag 3. Findings of positive associations between air pollution and suicide appear to be consistent across study locations with vastly different meteorological, geographical, and cultural characteristics.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwu341
PMCID: PMC4339389  PMID: 25673816
air pollution; case-crossover studies; environmental exposure; nitrogen dioxide; particulate matter; risk factors; suicide
9.  Psychiatric Comorbidity and Medication Use in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder 
The purpose of this study was to investigate comorbid psychiatric disorders and psychotropic medication use among adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ascertained as children during a 1980’s statewide Utah autism prevalence study (n = 129). Seventy-three individuals (56.6 %) met criteria for a current psychiatric disorder; 89 participants (69.0 %) met lifetime criteria for a psychiatric disorder. Caregivers reported a psychiatric diagnosis in 44 participants (34.1 %). Anxiety disorder had the highest current and lifetime prevalence (39.5 and 52.7 %, respectively). Participants with intellectual disability (n = 94, 72.8 %) were significantly less likely to have community-based diagnoses of anxiety (χ2 = 5.37, p = 0.02) or depression (χ2 = 13.18, p < 0.001) reported by caregivers. Seventy-six participants (58.9 %) were taking ≥1 psychotropic medication. Comorbid psychiatric disorders occur frequently in adults with ASD, though identifying these disorders poses a challenge in community settings. A greater understanding of the presentation of these conditions within this population will increase assessment validity and the potential for efficacious intervention.
doi:10.1007/s10803-014-2170-2
PMCID: PMC4355011  PMID: 24958436
Autism spectrum disorder; Psychiatric comorbidity; Psychotropic medication; Intellectual disability
10.  Autism Spectrum Disorder Reclassified: A Second Look at the 1980s Utah/UCLA Autism Epidemiologic Study 
The purpose of the present study was to re-examine diagnostic data from a state-wide autism prevalence study (n = 489) conducted in the 1980s to investigate the impact of broader diagnostic criteria on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) case status. Sixty-four (59 %) of the 108 originally “Diagnosed Not Autistic” met the current ASD case definition. The average IQ estimate in the newly identified group (IQ = 35.58; SD = 23.01) was significantly lower than in the original group (IQ = 56.19 SD = 21.21; t = 5.75; p < .0001). Today’s diagnostic criteria applied to participants ascertained in the 1980s identified more cases of autism with intellectual disability. The current analysis puts this historic work into context and highlights differences in ascertainment between epidemiological studies performed decades ago and those of today.
doi:10.1007/s10803-012-1566-0
PMCID: PMC4467195  PMID: 22696195
Autism; Epidemiology; Prevalence; Diagnostic criteria; Intellectual disability
11.  Comparative Analysis of Suicide, Accidental, and Undetermined Cause of Death Classification 
Suicide determination is not standardized across medical examiners, and many suspected suicides are later classified as accidental or undetermined. The present study investigated patterns between these three groups using a Medical Examiner database and 633 structured interviews with next of kin. There were similarities across all three classification groups, including rates of mental illness and psychiatric symptoms. Those classified suicide were more likely to be male, to have died in a violent fashion, and have a stronger family history of suicide. Physical pain was very common, but acute pain vs. chronic pain distinguished the suicide group.
PMCID: PMC4411039  PMID: 25057525
suicide; pain; veteran
12.  Synaptic, transcriptional, and chromatin genes disrupted in autism 
De Rubeis, Silvia | He, Xin | Goldberg, Arthur P. | Poultney, Christopher S. | Samocha, Kaitlin | Cicek, A Ercument | Kou, Yan | Liu, Li | Fromer, Menachem | Walker, Susan | Singh, Tarjinder | Klei, Lambertus | Kosmicki, Jack | Fu, Shih-Chen | Aleksic, Branko | Biscaldi, Monica | Bolton, Patrick F. | Brownfeld, Jessica M. | Cai, Jinlu | Campbell, Nicholas J. | Carracedo, Angel | Chahrour, Maria H. | Chiocchetti, Andreas G. | Coon, Hilary | Crawford, Emily L. | Crooks, Lucy | Curran, Sarah R. | Dawson, Geraldine | Duketis, Eftichia | Fernandez, Bridget A. | Gallagher, Louise | Geller, Evan | Guter, Stephen J. | Hill, R. Sean | Ionita-Laza, Iuliana | Gonzalez, Patricia Jimenez | Kilpinen, Helena | Klauck, Sabine M. | Kolevzon, Alexander | Lee, Irene | Lei, Jing | Lehtimäki, Terho | Lin, Chiao-Feng | Ma'ayan, Avi | Marshall, Christian R. | McInnes, Alison L. | Neale, Benjamin | Owen, Michael J. | Ozaki, Norio | Parellada, Mara | Parr, Jeremy R. | Purcell, Shaun | Puura, Kaija | Rajagopalan, Deepthi | Rehnström, Karola | Reichenberg, Abraham | Sabo, Aniko | Sachse, Michael | Sanders, Stephan J. | Schafer, Chad | Schulte-Rüther, Martin | Skuse, David | Stevens, Christine | Szatmari, Peter | Tammimies, Kristiina | Valladares, Otto | Voran, Annette | Wang, Li-San | Weiss, Lauren A. | Willsey, A. Jeremy | Yu, Timothy W. | Yuen, Ryan K.C. | Cook, Edwin H. | Freitag, Christine M. | Gill, Michael | Hultman, Christina M. | Lehner, Thomas | Palotie, Aarno | Schellenberg, Gerard D. | Sklar, Pamela | State, Matthew W. | Sutcliffe, James S. | Walsh, Christopher A. | Scherer, Stephen W. | Zwick, Michael E. | Barrett, Jeffrey C. | Cutler, David J. | Roeder, Kathryn | Devlin, Bernie | Daly, Mark J. | Buxbaum, Joseph D.
Nature  2014;515(7526):209-215.
Summary
The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variation and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, and a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic, transcriptional, and chromatin remodeling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating propagation of action potentials, pacemaking, and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodelers, prominently histone post-translational modifications involving lysine methylation/demethylation.
doi:10.1038/nature13772
PMCID: PMC4402723  PMID: 25363760
13.  Association of the CHRNA4 neuronal nicotinic receptor subunit gene with frequency of binge drinking in young adults 
Background
Binge drinking is responsible for over half of all alcohol-related deaths, and results in significant health and economic costs to individuals and society. Knowledge of genetic aspects of this behavior, particularly as it emerges in young adulthood, could lead to improved treatment and prevention programs.
Methods
We have focused on the association of variation in neuronal nicotinic receptor subunit genes (CHRNs) in a cohort of 702 Hispanic and non-Hispanic White young adults who are part of the Social and Emotional Contexts of Adolescent Smoking Patterns (SECASP) study. Fifty-five single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the variation in five CHRNs (CHRNA4, CHRNB2, CHRNA2, CHRNB3A6 and CHRNA5A3B4) were studied.
Results
Frequency of binge drinking and other correlated alcohol consumption measures were significantly associated with SNPs in CHRNA4 (p-values ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02), but not with SNPs in other CHRNs. This association was independent of smoking status in our cohort.
Conclusions
Variants in CHRNA4 may contribute to risk for binge drinking in young adults in this cohort. Results will need to be confirmed in independent samples.
doi:10.1111/acer.12319
PMCID: PMC3984345  PMID: 24428733
binge drinking; neuronal nicotinic receptor genes; genetic association
14.  Altitude is a Risk Factor for Completed Suicide in Bipolar Disorder 
Medical hypotheses  2014;82(3):377-381.
Summary
Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe brain disease that is associated with a significant risk for suicide. Recent studies indicate that altitude of residence significantly affects overall rate of completed suicide, and is associated with a higher incidence of depressive symptoms. Bipolar disorder has shown to be linked to mitochondrial dysfunction that may increase the severity of episodes. The present study used existing data sets to explore the hypothesis that altitude has a greater effect of suicide in BD, compared with other mental illnesses. The study utilized data extracted from the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS), a surveillance system designed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC). Data were available for 16 states for the years 2005–2008, representing a total of 35,725 completed suicides in 922 U.S. counties. Random coefficient and logistic regression models in the SAS PROC MIXED procedure were used to estimate the effect of altitude on decedent’s mental health diagnosis. Altitude was a significant, independent predictor of the altitude at which suicides occurred (F = 8.28, p=0.004 and Wald chi-square=21.67, p < 0.0001). Least squares means of altitude, independent of other variables, indicated that individuals with BD committed suicide at the greatest mean altitude. Moreover, the mean altitude at which suicides occurred in BD was significantly higher than in decedents whose mental health diagnosis was major depressive disorder (MDD), schizophrenia, or anxiety disorder. Identifying diagnosis-specific risk factors such as altitude may aid suicide prevention efforts, and provide important information for improving the clinical management of BD.
doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2014.01.006
PMCID: PMC3981603  PMID: 24495565
15.  Maternal Prenatal Weight Gain and Autism Spectrum Disorders 
Pediatrics  2013;132(5):e1276-e1283.
BACKGROUND:
The rising population of individuals identified with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) calls for further investigation of its underlying etiology. A disturbance in the fetal steroid hormone environment may be a mechanism in which environmental and genetic risk factors interact. The mother, fetus, and placenta collectively create the fetal steroid environment. Prepregnancy BMI and pregnancy weight gain have served as markers for fetal steroid hormone exposure in other disease states. This study’s objective is to determine whether prepregnancy BMI and pregnancy weight gain are associated with increased ASD risk across study designs and cohorts while controlling for important confounding variables.
METHODS:
A population-based Utah ASD cohort (n = 128) was ascertained in a 3-county surveillance area and gender- and age-matched to 10 920 control subjects. A second, research-based ASD cohort of Utah children (n = 288) and their unaffected siblings (n = 493) were ascertained through participation in an ASD genetics study. Prenatal variables were obtained from birth certificate records.
RESULTS:
ASD risk was significantly associated with pregnancy weight gain (adjusted odds ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence interval: 1.03 to 1.17; adjusted odds ratio = 1.17, 95% confidence interval: 1.01 to 1.35 for each 5 pounds of weight gained), but not prepregnancy BMI, in population and research-based cohorts, respectively. When analyses were restricted to ASD cases with normal IQ, these associations remained significant.
CONCLUSIONS:
ASD risk associated with a modest yet consistent increase in pregnancy weight gain suggests that pregnancy weight gain may serve as an important marker for autism’s underlying gestational etiology. This justifies an investigation into phenomena that link pregnancy weight gain and ASD independent of prepregnancy BMI.
doi:10.1542/peds.2013-1188
PMCID: PMC3813395  PMID: 24167172
autism; prenatal; weight gain; risk factors; epidemiology
16.  A unified test of linkage analysis and rare-variant association for analysis of pedigree sequence data 
Nature biotechnology  2014;32(7):663-669.
High-throughput sequencing of related individuals has become an important tool for studying human disease. However, owing to technical complexity and lack of available tools, most pedigree-based sequencing studies rely on an ad hoc combination of suboptimal analyses. Here we present pedigree-VAAST (pVAAST), a disease-gene identification tool designed for high-throughput sequence data in pedigrees. pVAAST uses a sequence-based model to perform variant and gene-based linkage analysis. Linkage information is then combined with functional prediction and rare variant case-control association information in a unified statistical framework. pVAAST outperformed linkage and rare-variant association tests in simulations and identified disease-causing genes from whole-genome sequence data in three human pedigrees with dominant, recessive and de novo inheritance patterns. The approach is robust to incomplete penetrance and locus heterogeneity and is applicable to a wide variety of genetic traits. pVAAST maintains high power across studies of monogenic, high-penetrance phenotypes in a single pedigree to highly polygenic, common phenotypes involving hundreds of pedigrees.
doi:10.1038/nbt.2895
PMCID: PMC4157619  PMID: 24837662
17.  Association of the CHRNA4 Neuronal Nicotinic Receptor Subunit Gene with Frequency of Binge Drinking in Young Adults 
Background
Binge drinking is responsible for over half of all alcohol‐related deaths and results in significant health and economic costs to individuals and society. Knowledge of genetic aspects of this behavior, particularly as it emerges in young adulthood, could lead to improved treatment and prevention programs.
Methods
We have focused on the association of variation in neuronal nicotinic receptor subunit genes (CHRNs) in a cohort of 702 Hispanic and non‐Hispanic White young adults who are part of the Social and Emotional Contexts of Adolescent Smoking Patterns (SECASP) study. Fifty‐five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the variation in 5 CHRNs (CHRNA4,CHRNB2,CHRNA2, CHRNB3A6, and CHRNA5A3B4) were studied.
Results
Frequency of binge drinking and other correlated alcohol consumption measures were significantly associated with SNPs in CHRNA4 (p‐values ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02), but not with SNPs in other CHRNs. This association was independent of smoking status in our cohort.
Conclusions
Variants in CHRNA4 may contribute to risk of binge drinking in young adults in this cohort. Results will need to be confirmed in independent samples.
doi:10.1111/acer.12319
PMCID: PMC3984345  PMID: 24428733
Binge Drinking; Neuronal Nicotinic Receptor Genes; Genetic Association
18.  The Autism Simplex Collection: an international, expertly phenotyped autism sample for genetic and phenotypic analyses 
Molecular Autism  2014;5:34.
Background
There is an urgent need for expanding and enhancing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) samples, in order to better understand causes of ASD.
Methods
In a unique public-private partnership, 13 sites with extensive experience in both the assessment and diagnosis of ASD embarked on an ambitious, 2-year program to collect samples for genetic and phenotypic research and begin analyses on these samples. The program was called The Autism Simplex Collection (TASC). TASC sample collection began in 2008 and was completed in 2010, and included nine sites from North America and four sites from Western Europe, as well as a centralized Data Coordinating Center.
Results
Over 1,700 trios are part of this collection, with DNA from transformed cells now available through the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS-G) measures are available for all probands, as are standardized IQ measures, Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales (VABS), the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), and physical measures (height, weight, and head circumference). At almost every site, additional phenotypic measures were collected, including the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire (BAPQ) and Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised (RBS-R), as well as the non-word repetition scale, Communication Checklist (Children’s or Adult), and Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC). Moreover, for nearly 1,000 trios, the Autism Genome Project Consortium (AGP) has carried out Illumina 1 M SNP genotyping and called copy number variation (CNV) in the samples, with data being made available through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been carried out in over 500 probands, together with ancestry matched controls, and this data is also available through the NIH. Additional WES is being carried out by the Autism Sequencing Consortium (ASC), where the focus is on sequencing complete trios. ASC sequencing for the first 1,000 samples (all from whole-blood DNA) is complete and data will be released in 2014. Data is being made available through NIH databases (database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) and National Database for Autism Research (NDAR)) with DNA released in Dist 11.0. Primary funding for the collection, genotyping, sequencing and distribution of TASC samples was provided by Autism Speaks and the NIH, including the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the National Human Genetics Research Institute (NHGRI).
Conclusions
TASC represents an important sample set that leverages expert sites. Similar approaches, leveraging expert sites and ongoing studies, represent an important path towards further enhancing available ASD samples.
doi:10.1186/2040-2392-5-34
PMCID: PMC4228819  PMID: 25392729
19.  Severity of cough in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is associated with MUC5 B genotype 
Background
A polymorphism (rs35705950) in the promoter region of the mucin MUC5B is associated with both familial and sporadic forms of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. (IPF) We hypothesize that this common MUC5B variant will impact the expression of cough, a frequent disabling symptom seen in subjects with IPF.
Methods
We genotyped 136 subjects with IPF. All living subjects were provided with a Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) to measure cough severity. We assessed allele effects of the MUC5B polymorphism on the LCQ scores using SAS General Linear Models (GLM) in the patients with IPF.
Results
In the 68 of the total 136 IPF patients who returned the LCQ, MUC5B minor allele frequency (T) is consistent with prior published studies (31%). We found a significant independent effect of the T allele on the LCQ score (p = 0.002 for subjects with IPF). This effect is independent of other common causes of cough, including gastroesophogeal reflux disease and upper airway cough syndrome.
Conclusions
Cough severity, a common disabling phenotypic component of IPF, is significantly associated with the presence of the minor allele of a MUC5B promoter polymorphism. This study highlights a possible genetic mechanism for phenotypic heterogeneity in pulmonary fibrosis.
doi:10.1186/1745-9974-10-3
PMCID: PMC4038402  PMID: 24667072
20.  Distinct Loci in the CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4 Gene Cluster Are Associated With Onset of Regular Smoking 
Stephens, Sarah H. | Hartz, Sarah M. | Hoft, Nicole R. | Saccone, Nancy L. | Corley, Robin C. | Hewitt, John K. | Hopfer, Christian J. | Breslau, Naomi | Coon, Hilary | Chen, Xiangning | Ducci, Francesca | Dueker, Nicole | Franceschini, Nora | Frank, Josef | Han, Younghun | Hansel, Nadia N. | Jiang, Chenhui | Korhonen, Tellervo | Lind, Penelope A. | Liu, Jason | Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka | Michel, Martha | Shaffer, John R. | Short, Susan E. | Sun, Juzhong | Teumer, Alexander | Thompson, John R. | Vogelzangs, Nicole | Vink, Jacqueline M. | Wenzlaff, Angela | Wheeler, William | Yang, Bao-Zhu | Aggen, Steven H. | Balmforth, Anthony J. | Baumeister, Sebastian E. | Beaty, Terri H. | Benjamin, Daniel J. | Bergen, Andrew W. | Broms, Ulla | Cesarini, David | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | Chen, Jingchun | Cheng, Yu-Ching | Cichon, Sven | Couper, David | Cucca, Francesco | Dick, Danielle | Foroud, Tatiana | Furberg, Helena | Giegling, Ina | Gillespie, Nathan A. | Gu, Fangyi | Hall, Alistair S. | Hällfors, Jenni | Han, Shizhong | Hartmann, Annette M. | Heikkilä, Kauko | Hickie, Ian B. | Hottenga, Jouke Jan | Jousilahti, Pekka | Kaakinen, Marika | Kähönen, Mika | Koellinger, Philipp D. | Kittner, Stephen | Konte, Bettina | Landi, Maria-Teresa | Laatikainen, Tiina | Leppert, Mark | Levy, Steven M. | Mathias, Rasika A. | McNeil, Daniel W. | Medland, Sarah E. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Murray, Tanda | Nauck, Matthias | North, Kari E. | Paré, Peter D. | Pergadia, Michele | Ruczinski, Ingo | Salomaa, Veikko | Viikari, Jorma | Willemsen, Gonneke | Barnes, Kathleen C. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caporaso, Neil | Edenberg, Howard J. | Francks, Clyde | Gelernter, Joel | Grabe, Hans Jörgen | Hops, Hyman | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Johannesson, Magnus | Kendler, Kenneth S. | Lehtimäki, Terho | Magnusson, Patrik K.E. | Marazita, Mary L. | Marchini, Jonathan | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Nöthen, Markus M. | Penninx, Brenda W. | Raitakari, Olli | Rietschel, Marcella | Rujescu, Dan | Samani, Nilesh J. | Schwartz, Ann G. | Shete, Sanjay | Spitz, Margaret | Swan, Gary E. | Völzke, Henry | Veijola, Juha | Wei, Qingyi | Amos, Chris | Cannon, Dale S. | Grucza, Richard | Hatsukami, Dorothy | Heath, Andrew | Johnson, Eric O. | Kaprio, Jaakko | Madden, Pamela | Martin, Nicholas G. | Stevens, Victoria L. | Weiss, Robert B. | Kraft, Peter | Bierut, Laura J. | Ehringer, Marissa A.
Genetic epidemiology  2013;37(8):846-859.
Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) genes (CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4) have been reproducibly associated with nicotine dependence, smoking behaviors, and lung cancer risk. Of the few reports that have focused on early smoking behaviors, association results have been mixed. This meta-analysis examines early smoking phenotypes and SNPs in the gene cluster to determine: (1) whether the most robust association signal in this region (rs16969968) for other smoking behaviors is also associated with early behaviors, and/or (2) if additional statistically independent signals are important in early smoking. We focused on two phenotypes: age of tobacco initiation (AOI) and age of first regular tobacco use (AOS). This study included 56,034 subjects (41 groups) spanning nine countries and evaluated five SNPs including rs1948, rs16969968, rs578776, rs588765, and rs684513. Each dataset was analyzed using a centrally generated script. Meta-analyses were conducted from summary statistics. AOS yielded significant associations with SNPs rs578776 (beta = 0.02, P = 0.004), rs1948 (beta = 0.023, P = 0.018), and rs684513 (beta = 0.032, P = 0.017), indicating protective effects. There were no significant associations for the AOI phenotype. Importantly, rs16969968, the most replicated signal in this region for nicotine dependence, cigarettes per day, and cotinine levels, was not associated with AOI (P = 0.59) or AOS (P = 0.92). These results provide important insight into the complexity of smoking behavior phenotypes, and suggest that association signals in the CHRNA5/A3/B4 gene cluster affecting early smoking behaviors may be different from those affecting the mature nicotine dependence phenotype.
doi:10.1002/gepi.21760
PMCID: PMC3947535  PMID: 24186853
CHRNA5; CHRNA3; CHRNB4; meta-analysis; nicotine; smoke
21.  Increased Genetic Vulnerability to Smoking at CHRNA5 in Early-Onset Smokers 
Hartz, Sarah M. | Short, Susan E. | Saccone, Nancy L. | Culverhouse, Robert | Chen, LiShiun | Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi | Coon, Hilary | Han, Younghun | Stephens, Sarah H. | Sun, Juzhong | Chen, Xiangning | Ducci, Francesca | Dueker, Nicole | Franceschini, Nora | Frank, Josef | Geller, Frank | Guđbjartsson, Daniel | Hansel, Nadia N. | Jiang, Chenhui | Keskitalo-Vuokko, Kaisu | Liu, Zhen | Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka | Michel, Martha | Rawal, Rajesh | Hum, Sc | Rosenberger, Albert | Scheet, Paul | Shaffer, John R. | Teumer, Alexander | Thompson, John R. | Vink, Jacqueline M. | Vogelzangs, Nicole | Wenzlaff, Angela S. | Wheeler, William | Xiao, Xiangjun | Yang, Bao-Zhu | Aggen, Steven H. | Balmforth, Anthony J. | Baumeister, Sebastian E. | Beaty, Terri | Bennett, Siiri | Bergen, Andrew W. | Boyd, Heather A. | Broms, Ulla | Campbell, Harry | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | Chen, Jingchun | Cheng, Yu-Ching | Cichon, Sven | Couper, David | Cucca, Francesco | Dick, Danielle M. | Foroud, Tatiana | Furberg, Helena | Giegling, Ina | Gu, Fangyi | Hall, Alistair S. | Hällfors, Jenni | Han, Shizhong | Hartmann, Annette M. | Hayward, Caroline | Heikkilä, Kauko | Lic, Phil | Hewitt, John K. | Hottenga, Jouke Jan | Jensen, Majken K. | Jousilahti, Pekka | Kaakinen, Marika | Kittner, Steven J. | Konte, Bettina | Korhonen, Tellervo | Landi, Maria-Teresa | Laatikainen, Tiina | Leppert, Mark | Levy, Steven M. | Mathias, Rasika A. | McNeil, Daniel W. | Medland, Sarah E. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Muley, Thomas | Murray, Tanda | Nauck, Matthias | North, Kari | Pergadia, Michele | Polasek, Ozren | Ramos, Erin M. | Ripatti, Samuli | Risch, Angela | Ruczinski, Ingo | Rudan, Igor | Salomaa, Veikko | Schlessinger, David | Styrkársdóttir, Unnur | Terracciano, Antonio | Uda, Manuela | Willemsen, Gonneke | Wu, Xifeng | Abecasis, Goncalo | Barnes, Kathleen | Bickeböller, Heike | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caporaso, Neil | Duan, Jubao | Edenberg, Howard J. | Francks, Clyde | Gejman, Pablo V. | Gelernter, Joel | Grabe, Hans Jörgen | Hops, Hyman | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Viikari, Jorma | Kähönen, Mika | Kendler, Kenneth S. | Lehtimäki, Terho | Levinson, Douglas F. | Marazita, Mary L. | Marchini, Jonathan | Melbye, Mads | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Murray, Jeffrey C. | Nöthen, Markus M. | Penninx, Brenda W. | Raitakari, Olli | Rietschel, Marcella | Rujescu, Dan | Samani, Nilesh J. | Sanders, Alan R. | Schwartz, Ann G. | Shete, Sanjay | Shi, Jianxin | Spitz, Margaret | Stefansson, Kari | Swan, Gary E. | Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir | Völzke, Henry | Wei, Qingyi | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Amos, Christopher I. | Breslau, Naomi | Cannon, Dale S. | Ehringer, Marissa | Grucza, Richard | Hatsukami, Dorothy | Heath, Andrew | Johnson, Eric O. | Kaprio, Jaakko | Madden, Pamela | Martin, Nicholas G. | Stevens, Victoria L. | Stitzel, Jerry A. | Weiss, Robert B. | Kraft, Peter | Bierut, Laura J.
Archives of general psychiatry  2012;69(8):854-860.
Context
Recent studies have shown an association between cigarettes per day (CPD) and a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism in CHRNA5, rs16969968.
Objective
To determine whether the association between rs16969968 and smoking is modified by age at onset of regular smoking.
Data Sources
Primary data.
Study Selection
Available genetic studies containing measures of CPD and the genotype of rs16969968 or its proxy.
Data Extraction
Uniform statistical analysis scripts were run locally. Starting with 94 050 ever-smokers from 43 studies, we extracted the heavy smokers (CPD >20) and light smokers (CPD ≤10) with age-at-onset information, reducing the sample size to 33 348. Each study was stratified into early-onset smokers (age at onset ≤16 years) and late-onset smokers (age at onset >16 years), and a logistic regression of heavy vs light smoking with the rs16969968 genotype was computed for each stratum. Meta-analysis was performed within each age-at-onset stratum.
Data Synthesis
Individuals with 1 risk allele at rs16969968 who were early-onset smokers were significantly more likely to be heavy smokers in adulthood (odds ratio [OR]=1.45; 95% CI, 1.36–1.55; n=13 843) than were carriers of the risk allele who were late-onset smokers (OR = 1.27; 95% CI, 1.21–1.33, n = 19 505) (P = .01).
Conclusion
These results highlight an increased genetic vulnerability to smoking in early-onset smokers.
doi:10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2012.124
PMCID: PMC3482121  PMID: 22868939
22.  Individual common variants exert weak effects on the risk for autism spectrum disorders 
Anney, Richard | Klei, Lambertus | Pinto, Dalila | Almeida, Joana | Bacchelli, Elena | Baird, Gillian | Bolshakova, Nadia | Bölte, Sven | Bolton, Patrick F. | Bourgeron, Thomas | Brennan, Sean | Brian, Jessica | Casey, Jillian | Conroy, Judith | Correia, Catarina | Corsello, Christina | Crawford, Emily L. | de Jonge, Maretha | Delorme, Richard | Duketis, Eftichia | Duque, Frederico | Estes, Annette | Farrar, Penny | Fernandez, Bridget A. | Folstein, Susan E. | Fombonne, Eric | Gilbert, John | Gillberg, Christopher | Glessner, Joseph T. | Green, Andrew | Green, Jonathan | Guter, Stephen J. | Heron, Elizabeth A. | Holt, Richard | Howe, Jennifer L. | Hughes, Gillian | Hus, Vanessa | Igliozzi, Roberta | Jacob, Suma | Kenny, Graham P. | Kim, Cecilia | Kolevzon, Alexander | Kustanovich, Vlad | Lajonchere, Clara M. | Lamb, Janine A. | Law-Smith, Miriam | Leboyer, Marion | Le Couteur, Ann | Leventhal, Bennett L. | Liu, Xiao-Qing | Lombard, Frances | Lord, Catherine | Lotspeich, Linda | Lund, Sabata C. | Magalhaes, Tiago R. | Mantoulan, Carine | McDougle, Christopher J. | Melhem, Nadine M. | Merikangas, Alison | Minshew, Nancy J. | Mirza, Ghazala K. | Munson, Jeff | Noakes, Carolyn | Nygren, Gudrun | Papanikolaou, Katerina | Pagnamenta, Alistair T. | Parrini, Barbara | Paton, Tara | Pickles, Andrew | Posey, David J. | Poustka, Fritz | Ragoussis, Jiannis | Regan, Regina | Roberts, Wendy | Roeder, Kathryn | Roge, Bernadette | Rutter, Michael L. | Schlitt, Sabine | Shah, Naisha | Sheffield, Val C. | Soorya, Latha | Sousa, Inês | Stoppioni, Vera | Sykes, Nuala | Tancredi, Raffaella | Thompson, Ann P. | Thomson, Susanne | Tryfon, Ana | Tsiantis, John | Van Engeland, Herman | Vincent, John B. | Volkmar, Fred | Vorstman, JAS | Wallace, Simon | Wing, Kirsty | Wittemeyer, Kerstin | Wood, Shawn | Zurawiecki, Danielle | Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie | Bailey, Anthony J. | Battaglia, Agatino | Cantor, Rita M. | Coon, Hilary | Cuccaro, Michael L. | Dawson, Geraldine | Ennis, Sean | Freitag, Christine M. | Geschwind, Daniel H. | Haines, Jonathan L. | Klauck, Sabine M. | McMahon, William M. | Maestrini, Elena | Miller, Judith | Monaco, Anthony P. | Nelson, Stanley F. | Nurnberger, John I. | Oliveira, Guiomar | Parr, Jeremy R. | Pericak-Vance, Margaret A. | Piven, Joseph | Schellenberg, Gerard D. | Scherer, Stephen W. | Vicente, Astrid M. | Wassink, Thomas H. | Wijsman, Ellen M. | Betancur, Catalina | Buxbaum, Joseph D. | Cook, Edwin H. | Gallagher, Louise | Gill, Michael | Hallmayer, Joachim | Paterson, Andrew D. | Sutcliffe, James S. | Szatmari, Peter | Vieland, Veronica J. | Hakonarson, Hakon | Devlin, Bernie
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(21):4781-4792.
While it is apparent that rare variation can play an important role in the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the contribution of common variation to the risk of developing ASD is less clear. To produce a more comprehensive picture, we report Stage 2 of the Autism Genome Project genome-wide association study, adding 1301 ASD families and bringing the total to 2705 families analysed (Stages 1 and 2). In addition to evaluating the association of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we also sought evidence that common variants, en masse, might affect the risk. Despite genotyping over a million SNPs covering the genome, no single SNP shows significant association with ASD or selected phenotypes at a genome-wide level. The SNP that achieves the smallest P-value from secondary analyses is rs1718101. It falls in CNTNAP2, a gene previously implicated in susceptibility for ASD. This SNP also shows modest association with age of word/phrase acquisition in ASD subjects, of interest because features of language development are also associated with other variation in CNTNAP2. In contrast, allele scores derived from the transmission of common alleles to Stage 1 cases significantly predict case status in the independent Stage 2 sample. Despite being significant, the variance explained by these allele scores was small (Vm< 1%). Based on results from individual SNPs and their en masse effect on risk, as inferred from the allele score results, it is reasonable to conclude that common variants affect the risk for ASD but their individual effects are modest.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds301
PMCID: PMC3471395  PMID: 22843504
23.  A novel approach of homozygous haplotype sharing identifies candidate genes in autism spectrum disorder 
Casey, Jillian P. | Magalhaes, Tiago | Conroy, Judith M. | Regan, Regina | Shah, Naisha | Anney, Richard | Shields, Denis C. | Abrahams, Brett S. | Almeida, Joana | Bacchelli, Elena | Bailey, Anthony J. | Baird, Gillian | Battaglia, Agatino | Berney, Tom | Bolshakova, Nadia | Bolton, Patrick F. | Bourgeron, Thomas | Brennan, Sean | Cali, Phil | Correia, Catarina | Corsello, Christina | Coutanche, Marc | Dawson, Geraldine | de Jonge, Maretha | Delorme, Richard | Duketis, Eftichia | Duque, Frederico | Estes, Annette | Farrar, Penny | Fernandez, Bridget A. | Folstein, Susan E. | Foley, Suzanne | Fombonne, Eric | Freitag, Christine M. | Gilbert, John | Gillberg, Christopher | Glessner, Joseph T. | Green, Jonathan | Guter, Stephen J. | Hakonarson, Hakon | Holt, Richard | Hughes, Gillian | Hus, Vanessa | Igliozzi, Roberta | Kim, Cecilia | Klauck, Sabine M. | Kolevzon, Alexander | Lamb, Janine A. | Leboyer, Marion | Le Couteur, Ann | Leventhal, Bennett L. | Lord, Catherine | Lund, Sabata C. | Maestrini, Elena | Mantoulan, Carine | Marshall, Christian R. | McConachie, Helen | McDougle, Christopher J. | McGrath, Jane | McMahon, William M. | Merikangas, Alison | Miller, Judith | Minopoli, Fiorella | Mirza, Ghazala K. | Munson, Jeff | Nelson, Stanley F. | Nygren, Gudrun | Oliveira, Guiomar | Pagnamenta, Alistair T. | Papanikolaou, Katerina | Parr, Jeremy R. | Parrini, Barbara | Pickles, Andrew | Pinto, Dalila | Piven, Joseph | Posey, David J. | Poustka, Annemarie | Poustka, Fritz | Ragoussis, Jiannis | Roge, Bernadette | Rutter, Michael L. | Sequeira, Ana F. | Soorya, Latha | Sousa, Inês | Sykes, Nuala | Stoppioni, Vera | Tancredi, Raffaella | Tauber, Maïté | Thompson, Ann P. | Thomson, Susanne | Tsiantis, John | Van Engeland, Herman | Vincent, John B. | Volkmar, Fred | Vorstman, Jacob A. S. | Wallace, Simon | Wang, Kai | Wassink, Thomas H. | White, Kathy | Wing, Kirsty | Wittemeyer, Kerstin | Yaspan, Brian L. | Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie | Betancur, Catalina | Buxbaum, Joseph D. | Cantor, Rita M. | Cook, Edwin H. | Coon, Hilary | Cuccaro, Michael L. | Geschwind, Daniel H. | Haines, Jonathan L. | Hallmayer, Joachim | Monaco, Anthony P. | Nurnberger, John I. | Pericak-Vance, Margaret A. | Schellenberg, Gerard D. | Scherer, Stephen W. | Sutcliffe, James S. | Szatmari, Peter | Vieland, Veronica J. | Wijsman, Ellen M. | Green, Andrew | Gill, Michael | Gallagher, Louise | Vicente, Astrid | Ennis, Sean
Human Genetics  2011;131(4):565-579.
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a highly heritable disorder of complex and heterogeneous aetiology. It is primarily characterized by altered cognitive ability including impaired language and communication skills and fundamental deficits in social reciprocity. Despite some notable successes in neuropsychiatric genetics, overall, the high heritability of ASD (~90%) remains poorly explained by common genetic risk variants. However, recent studies suggest that rare genomic variation, in particular copy number variation, may account for a significant proportion of the genetic basis of ASD. We present a large scale analysis to identify candidate genes which may contain low-frequency recessive variation contributing to ASD while taking into account the potential contribution of population differences to the genetic heterogeneity of ASD. Our strategy, homozygous haplotype (HH) mapping, aims to detect homozygous segments of identical haplotype structure that are shared at a higher frequency amongst ASD patients compared to parental controls. The analysis was performed on 1,402 Autism Genome Project trios genotyped for 1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We identified 25 known and 1,218 novel ASD candidate genes in the discovery analysis including CADM2, ABHD14A, CHRFAM7A, GRIK2, GRM3, EPHA3, FGF10, KCND2, PDZK1, IMMP2L and FOXP2. Furthermore, 10 of the previously reported ASD genes and 300 of the novel candidates identified in the discovery analysis were replicated in an independent sample of 1,182 trios. Our results demonstrate that regions of HH are significantly enriched for previously reported ASD candidate genes and the observed association is independent of gene size (odds ratio 2.10). Our findings highlight the applicability of HH mapping in complex disorders such as ASD and offer an alternative approach to the analysis of genome-wide association data.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00439-011-1094-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s00439-011-1094-6
PMCID: PMC3303079  PMID: 21996756
24.  Multistudy Fine Mapping of Chromosome 2q Identifies XRCC5 as a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Susceptibility Gene 
Rationale: Several family-based studies have identified genetic linkage for lung function and airflow obstruction to chromosome 2q.
Objectives: We hypothesized that merging results of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in four separate populations would lead to the identification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility genes on chromosome 2q.
Methods: Within the chromosome 2q linkage region, 2,843 SNPs were genotyped in 806 COPD cases and 779 control subjects from Norway, and 2,484 SNPs were genotyped in 309 patients with severe COPD from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial and 330 community control subjects. Significant associations from the combined results across the two case-control studies were followed up in 1,839 individuals from 603 families from the International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN) and in 949 individuals from 127 families in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study.
Measurements and Main Results: Merging the results of the two case-control analyses, 14 of the 790 overlapping SNPs had a combined P < 0.01. Two of these 14 SNPs were consistently associated with COPD in the ICGN families. The association with one SNP, located in the gene XRCC5, was replicated in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study, with a combined P = 2.51 × 10−5 across the four studies, which remains significant when adjusted for multiple testing (P = 0.02). Genotype imputation confirmed the association with SNPs in XRCC5.
Conclusions: By combining data from COPD genetic association studies conducted in four independent patient samples, we have identified XRCC5, an ATP-dependent DNA helicase, as a potential COPD susceptibility gene.
doi:10.1164/rccm.200910-1586OC
PMCID: PMC2937234  PMID: 20463177
emphysema; genetic linkage; metaanalysis; single nucleotide polymorphism
25.  Linkage Analysis of Tourette Syndrome in a Large Utah Pedigree 
Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics. The heritability of TS has been well established, yet there is a lack of consensus in genome-wide linkage studies. The purpose of this study was to conduct a genome-wide linkage analysis on a unique, large, high-risk TS Utah pedigree. We examined a qualitative trait (TS1) where cases had a definitive diagnosis of TS as observed by a clinical interviewer (n=66) and a quantitative phenotype based on the total Yale global motor and phonic tic severity scores (n=102). Both parametric and non-parametric multipoint linkage analyses based on MCMC methods were performed using a 10cM spaced micro-satellite autosomal marker set. Two regions of interest were identified under affecteds-only recessive models; a LOD score of 3.3 on chromosome 1p for Yale tic severity and a LOD score of 3.1 on chromosome 3p for the TS1 phenotype. Twenty-seven individuals shared linked segregating haplotypes for the 1p region. They had significantly higher Yale tic phonic scores than non-sharers (p=0.01). There were 46 haplotype sharers on chromosome 3p with significantly higher percentage of females among these individuals compared to the non-sharers (p=0.03). The significant linkage peaks on chromosomes 1p and 3p are in new areas of the genome for TS, and replication of these findings is necessary.
doi:10.1002/ajmg.b.31035
PMCID: PMC2923637  PMID: 19777563
Linkage analysis; Tourette Syndrome

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