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1.  Clinical Pathways for Non-ST Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome in Oman: An Oman Heart Association Protocol for Hospital Quality Improvement Initiative 
Oman Medical Journal  2014;29(1):8-11.
In 2012, Oman Heart Association (OHA) published its own guidelines for the management of patients with unstable angina/non–ST-elevation myocardial infarction, the aim was not to be comprehensive but rather simplified and practical in order to reduce the gap between the long comprehensive guidelines and our actual practice. However, we still feel that the busy registrars and residents need simpler and direct clinical pathways or protocol to be used in the emergency departments, coronary care units and in the wards. Clinical pathways are now one of the main tools used to manage the quality in healthcare concerning the standardization of care processes. It has been shown that their implementation reduces the variability in clinical practice and improves outcomes in acute care.
doi:10.5001/omj.2014.03
PMCID: PMC3910405  PMID: 24498475
Acute coronary syndrome; Non-ST elevation; Unstable angina; Myocardial infarction; Oman Heart Association
2.  Age and clinical outcomes in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes☆ 
Context
Elderly patients have more cardiovascular risk factors and a greater burden of ischemic disease than younger patients.
Aims
To examine the impact of age on clinical presentation and outcomes in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).
Methods and material
Collected data from the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2), which is a prospective multicenter study from six adjacent Arab Middle Eastern Gulf countries. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to their age: ≤50 years, 51–70 years and >70 years and their clinical characteristics and outcomes were analyzed. Mortality was assessed at one and 12 months.
Statistical analysis used
One-way ANOVA test for continuous variables, Pearson chi-square (X2) test for categorical variables and multivariate logistic regression analysis for predictors were performed.
Results
Among 7930 consecutive ACS patients; 2755 (35%) were ≤50 years, 4110 (52%) were 51–70 years and 1065 (13%) >70 years old. The proportion of women increased with increasing age (13% among patients ≤50 years to 31% among patients > 70 years). The risk factor pattern varied with age; younger patients were more often obese, smokers and had a positive family history of CAD, whereas older patients more likely to have diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Advancing age was associated with under-treatment evidence-based therapies. Multivariate logistic regression analysis after adjusting for relevant covariates showed that old age was independent predictors for re-ischemia (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.03–1.60), heart failure (OR 2.8; 95% CI 2.17–3.52) and major bleeding (OR 4.02; 95% CI 1.37–11.77) and in-hospital mortality (age 51–70: OR 2.67; 95% CI 1.86–3.85, and age >70: OR 4.71; 95% CI 3.11–7.14).
Conclusion
Despite being higher risk group, elderly are less likely to receive evidence-based therapies and had worse outcomes. Guidelines adherence is highly recommended in elderly.
doi:10.1016/j.jcdr.2012.08.005
PMCID: PMC3770118  PMID: 24027372
Acute coronary syndrome; Age; Elderly
3.  Gender Disparities in the Presentation, Management and Outcomes of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients: Data from the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2) 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(2):e55508.
Background
Gender-related differences in mortality of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) have been reported. The extent and causes of these differences in the Middle-East are poorly understood. We studied to what extent difference in outcome, specifically 1-year mortality are attributable to demographic, baseline clinical differences at presentation, and management differences between female and male patients.
Methodology/Principal Findings
Baseline characteristics, treatment patterns, and 1-year mortality of 7390 ACS patients in 65 hospitals in 6 Arabian Gulf countries were evaluated during 2008–2009, as part of the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2). Women were older (61.3±11.8 vs. 55.6±12.4; P<0.001), more overweight (BMI: 28.1±6.6 vs. 26.7±5.1; P<0.001), and more likely to have a history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia or diabetes. Fewer women than men received angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE), aspirin, clopidogrel, beta blockers or statins at discharge. They also underwent fewer invasive procedures including angiography (27.0% vs. 34.0%; P<0.001), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (10.5% vs. 15.6%; P<0.001) and reperfusion therapy (6.9% vs. 20.2%; P<0.001) than men. Women were at higher unadjusted risk for in-hospital death (6.8% vs. 4.0%, P<0.001) and heart failure (HF) (18% vs. 11.8%, P<0.001). Both 1-month and 1-year mortality rates were higher in women than men (11% vs. 7.4% and 17.3% vs. 11.4%, respectively, P<0.001). Both baseline and management differences contributed to a worse outcome in women. Together these variables explained almost all mortality disparities.
Conclusions/Significance
Differences between genders in mortality appeared to be largely explained by differences in prognostic variables and management patterns. However, the origin of the latter differences need further study.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0055508
PMCID: PMC3566183  PMID: 23405162
4.  The Epidemiology of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Oman 
Objectives:
This study aimed to evaluate the epidemiology and coronary risk factors of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Oman.
Methods:
Data were collected through a prospective, multinational, multicentre survey of consecutive patients, hospitalised over a 5-month period in 2007 with a diagnosis of ACS, in Yemen and five Arabian Gulf countries (Oman, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, United Arab Emirates). Here we present data of Omani patients aged ≥20 years who received a provisional diagnosis of ACS and were consequently admitted to 14 different hospitals.
Results:
There where 1,340 confirmed ACS episodes in 748 men and 592 women (median age 61 years). The overall crude incidence rate of ACS was 338.9 per 100,000 person-years (P-Y). The age-standardised rate (ASR) of ACS was 779 and 674 per 100,000 P-Y for men and women, respectively. The ASR male-to-female rate ratio was highest in the ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) group (2.26, 95% confidence interval ([CI], 1.63 to 3.15) followed by the non-STEMI (NSTEMI) group (1.68, 95% CI 1.28 to 2.21) and unstable angina (0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.99). Unstable angina accounted for 55%, STEMI for 26% and NSTEMI for 19% of ACS cases. Among the coronary risk factors, there was a high prevalence of hypertension (68%), diabetes mellitus (DM) (36%), hyperlipidaemia (63%), and overweight/obesity (65%), with a relatively low rate of current tobacco use (11%).
Conclusion:
Our study confirms a high incidence of ACS in Omanis and supports the notion that the cardiovascular disease epidemic is also sweeping developing countries.
PMCID: PMC3616799  PMID: 23573381
Acute coronary syndrome; Incidence; Cardiovascular disease; Ischemic heart disease; Risk factors; Oman
5.  Immediate and one-year outcome of patients presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome complicated by stroke: Findings from the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2) 
Background
Stroke is a potential complication of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence, risk factors predisposing to stroke, in-hospital and 1-year mortality among patients presenting with ACS in the Middle East.
Methods
For a period of 9 months in 2008 to 2009, 7,930 consecutive ACS patients were enrolled from 65 hospitals in 6 Middle East countries.
Results
The prevalence of in-hospital stroke following ACS was 0.70%. Most cases were ST segment elevation MI-related (STEMI) and ischemic stroke in nature. Patients with in-hospital stroke were 5 years older than patients without stroke and were more likely to have hypertension (66% vs. 47.6%, P = 0.001). There were no differences between the two groups in regards to gender, other cardiovascular risk factors, or prior cardiovascular disease. Patients with stroke were more likely to present with atypical symptoms, advanced Killip class and less likely to be treated with evidence-based therapies. Independent predictors of stroke were hypertension, advanced killip class, ACS type –STEMI and cardiogenic shock. Stroke was associated with increased risk of in-hospital (39.3% vs. 4.3%) and one-year mortality (52% vs. 12.3%).
Conclusion
There is low incidence of in-hospital stroke in Middle-Eastern patients presenting with ACS but with very high in-hospital and one-year mortality rates. Stroke patients were less likely to be appropriately treated with evidence-based therapy. Future work should be focused on reducing the risk and improving the outcome of this devastating complication.
doi:10.1186/1471-2261-12-64
PMCID: PMC3480946  PMID: 22894647
Acute coronary syndrome; Myocardial infarction; Stroke; Risk factors; Prognosis
6.  Predictive Value of a 4-Hour Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol in Patients with Suspected Ischemic Chest Pain Presenting to an Emergency Department 
Oman Medical Journal  2012;27(3):207-211.
Objectives
Currently recommended risk stratification protocols for suspected ischemic chest pain in the emergency department (ED) includes point-of-care availability of exercise treadmill/nuclear tests or CT coronary angiograms. These tests are not widely available for most of the ED’s. This study aims to prospectively validate the safety of a predefined 4-hour accelerated diagnostic protocol (ADP) using chest pain, ECG, and troponin T among suspected ischemic chest pain patients presenting to an ED of a tertiary care hospital in Oman.
Methods
One hundred and thirty-two patients aged over 18 years with suspected ischemic chest pain presenting within 12 hours of onset along with normal or non-diagnostic first ECG and negative first troponin T (<0.010 μg/l) were recruited from September 2008 to February 2009. Low-probability acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients at 4-hours defined as absent chest pain and negative ECG or troponin tests were discharged home and observed for 30-days for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (Group I: negative ADP). High-probability ACS patients at 4-hours were defined by recurrent or persistent chest pain, positive ECG or troponin tests and were admitted and observed for in-hospital MACE (Group II: positive ADP).
Results
One hundred and thirty-two patients were recruited and 110 patients completed the study. The overall 30-day MACE in this cohort was 15% with a mortality of less than 1%. 30-days MACE occurred in 8/95 of group I patients (8.4%) and 9/15 of the in-hospital MACE patients in group II. The ADP had a sensitivity of 52% (95% CI: 0.28-0.76), specificity of 93% (0.85-0.97), a negative predictive value of 91% (0.83-0.96), a positive predictive value of 60% (0.32-0.82), negative likelihood ratio of 0.5 (0.30-0.83) and a positive likelihood ratio of 8.2 (3.3-20) in predicting MACE.
Conclusion
A 4-hour ADP using chest pain, ECG, and troponin T had high specificity and negative predictive value in predicting 30-day MACE among low probability ACS patients discharged from ED. However, 30-day MACE in ADP negative patients was relatively high in contrast to guideline recommendations. Hence, there is a need to establish ED chest pain unit and adopt new protocols especially adding a point-of-care exercise treadmill test in the ED.
doi:10.5001/omj.2012.47
PMCID: PMC3394349  PMID: 22811769
Emergency department; Accelerated diagnostic protocol; Acute coronary syndrome; MACE; Exercise treadmill test; Chest pain unit
7.  Clinical Profile and Mortality of ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients Receiving Thrombolytic Therapy in the Middle East 
Objective:
Little is known about thrombolytic therapy patterns in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in the Middle East. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical profile and mortality of STEMI patients who arrived in hospital within 12 hours from pain onset and received thrombolytic therapy.
Patients and Methods:
This was a prospective, multinational, multi-centre, observational survey of consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients admitted to 65 hospitals in six Middle Eastern countries during the period between October 2008 and June 2009, as part of Gulf RACE-II (Registry of Acute Coronary Events). Analyses were performed using univariate statistics.
Results:
Out of 2,465 STEMI patients, 66% (n = 1,586) were thrombolysed with namely: streptokinase (43%), reteplase (44%), tenecteplase (10%), and alteplase (3%). 22.7% received no reperfusion. Median age of the study cohort was 50 (45-59) years with majority being males (91%). The overall median symptom onset-to-presentation and door-to-needle times were 165 (95- 272) minutes and 38 (24-60) minutes, respectively. Generally, patients presenting with higher GRACE risk scores were treated with newer thrombolytic agents (reteplase and tenecteplase) (P < 0.001). The use of newer thrombolytic agents was associated with a significantly lower mortality at both 1-month (0.8% vs. 1.7% vs. 4.2%; P = 0.014) and 1-year (0% vs. 1.7% vs. 3.4%; P = 0.044) compared to streptokinase use.
Conclusions:
Majority of STEMI patients from the Middle East were thrombolysed with streptokinase and reteplase in equal numbers. Nearly one-fifth of patients did not receive any reperfusion therapy. There was inappropriately long symptom-onset to hospital presentation as well as door-to-needle times. Use of newer thrombolytic agents in high risk patients was appropriate. Newer thrombolytic agents were associated with significantly lower mortality at 1-month and 1-year compared to the older agent, streptokinase.
doi:10.4103/1995-705X.99224
PMCID: PMC3424777  PMID: 22919446
Acute coronary syndrome; GRACE score; Middle East; mortality; reteplase; STEMI; streptokinase; tenecteplase; thrombolytic therapy
8.  Polyvascular Disease in Patients Presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome: Its Predictors and Outcomes 
The Scientific World Journal  2012;2012:284851.
We evaluated prevalence and clinical outcome of polyvascular disease (PolyVD) in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Data for 7689 consecutive ACS patients were collected from the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events between October 2008 and June 2009. Patients were divided into 2 groups (ACS with versus without PolyVD). All-cause mortality was assessed at 1 and 12 months. Patients with PolyVD were older and more likely to have cardiovascular risk factors. On presentation, those patients were more likely to have atypical angina, high resting heart rate, high Killip class, and GRACE risk scoring. They were less likely to receive evidence-based therapies. Diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and hypertension were independent predictors for presence of PolyVD. PolyVD was associated with worse in-hospital outcomes (except for major bleedings) and all-cause mortality even after adjusting for baseline covariates. Great efforts should be directed toward primary and secondary preventive measures.
doi:10.1100/2012/284851
PMCID: PMC3259691  PMID: 22272171
9.  Weekend Versus Weekday, Morning Versus Evening Admission in Relationship to Mortality in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in 6 Middle Eastern Countries: Results from Gulf Race 2 Registry 
We used prospective cohort data of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to compare their management on weekdays/mornings with weekends/nights, and the possible impact of this on 1-month and 1-year mortality. Analyses were evaluated using univariate and multivariate statistics. Of the 4,616 patients admitted to hospitals with ACS, 76% were on weekdays. There were no significant differences in 1-month (odds ratio (OR), 0.88; 95% CI: 0.68-1.14) and 1-year mortality (OR, 0.88; 95% CI: 0.70-1.10), respectively, between weekday and weekend admissions. Similarly, there were no significant differences in 1-month (OR, 0.92; 95% CI: 0.73-1.15) and 1-year mortality (OR, 0.98; 95% CI: 0.80-1.20), respectively, between nights and day admissions. In conclusion, apart from lower utilization of angiography (P < .001) at weekends, there were largely no significant discrepancies in the management and care of patients admitted with ACS on weekdays and during morning hours compared with patients admitted on weekends and night hours, and the overall 30-day and 1-year mortality was similar between both the cohorts.
doi:10.2174/1874192401206010106
PMCID: PMC3447162  PMID: 23002404
Acute coronary syndrome; Weekend; Weekday; Mortality; Admission.
10.  Is there an association between Fahr's disease and cardiac conduction system disease?: A case report 
BACKGROUND:
Fahr's disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of unknown cause characterized by idiopathic basal ganglia calcification that is associated with neuropsychiatric and cognitive impairment. No case of Fahr's disease with associated cardiac conduction disease has been described in the literature to date. The objective of this case report was to describe a young female with various cardiac conduction system abnormalities and bilateral basal ganglia calcification suggestive of Fahr's disease.
CASE REPORT:
A 19-year-old female was transferred to our hospital for a pacemaker insertion. Her past medical history included cognitive impairment and asymptomatic congenital complete heart block since birth. Her manifestations included cognitive impairment, tremors, rigidity, ataxia, bilateral basal ganglia calcification without clinical manifestations of mitochondrial cytopathy. She also had right bundle branch block, left anterior fascicular block, intermittent complete heart block, atrial arrhythmias with advanced atrioventricular blocks and ventricular asystole manifested by Stokes-Adams seizures, which was diagnosed as epilepsy.
CONCLUSIONS:
According to our knowledge, this was the first case report of a su spected association between Fahr's disease and isolated cardiac conduction system disease. In addition, this case illustrated that in patients with heart blocks and seizures, a diagnosis of epilepsy needs to be made with caution and such patients need further evaluations by a cardiologist or electrophysiologist to consider pacing and prevent future catastrophic events.
PMCID: PMC3523445  PMID: 23248663
Fahr's Disease; Basal Ganglia Calcification; Cardiac Conduction Defect; Congenital Heart Block; Epilepsy
11.  Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients Presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome in Six Middle Eastern Countries 
To describe prevalence and impact of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), data were collected over 5 months from 6 Middle Eastern countries. Patients were divided into 2 groups (with and without PAD). Out of 6705 consecutive ACS patients, PAD was reported in 177 patients. In comparison to non-PAD, PAD patients were older and more likely to have cardiovascular risk factors. They were more likely to have high Killip class, high GRACE risk score, and non-ST elevation ACS (NSTEACS) at presentation. Thrombolytics, antiplatelet use, and coronary intervention were comparable in both groups. When presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), patients with PAD had worse outcomes, while in NSTEACS; PAD was associated with higher rate of heart failure in comparison to non-PAD patients. In diabetics, PAD was associated with 2-fold increase in mortality when compared to non-PAD (P = 0.028). After adjustment, PAD was associated with high mortality in STEMI (adjusted OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.23–5.65, P = 0.01). Prevalence of PAD in ACS in the Gulf region is low. Patients with PAD and ACS constitute a high risk group and require more attention. PAD in patients with STEMI is an independent predictor of in-hospital death.
doi:10.1155/2011/815902
PMCID: PMC3246760  PMID: 22220279
12.  Severe thrombocytopenia following tirofiban infusion 
Indian Journal of Pharmacology  2011;43(6):726-728.
A 44-year-old man presented with acute coronary syndrome. He was administered glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist (tirofiban) for a left anterior descending artery thrombus detected during percutaneous coronary intervention. He developed very severe thrombocytopenia 24 h after tirofiban infusion with no signs of bleeding. The thrombocytopenia spontaneously resolved after stopping tirofiban without any significant clinical sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of tirofiban-induced severe thrombocytopenia from the Middle East. Clinicians using this drug should be aware of this potentially lethal adverse drug reaction. Close monitoring of platelet count early after the initiation of tirofiban infusion is suggested and discontinuation of tirofiban infusion can reverse thrombocytopenia spontaneously.
doi:10.4103/0253-7613.89837
PMCID: PMC3229796  PMID: 22144785
Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist; thrombocytopenia; tirofiban
13.  Acute Coronary Syndrome in Oman 
Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is the most common cause of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in Western countries. International guidelines for diagnosis and treatment have been developed based on randomised clinical trials. However, data from international registries report a lack of association between guideline recommendations and actual clinical practice. Similarly, the Gulf Heart Association initiated a registry called Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE). This registry was developed to determine the characteristics and management of ACS in the Gulf countries including Oman. Here, we report on the results of the various Gulf RACE registry studies from Oman and compare our results with the main Gulf RACE data as well as other international registries.
PMCID: PMC3210042  PMID: 22087374
Acute coronary syndrome; Oman
14.  Coronary Perforation and Covered Stents: An Update and Review 
Coronary perforation is a rare complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. We present two different types of coronary intervention, but both ending with coronary perforation. However, these perforations were tackled successfully by covered stents. This article reviews the incidence, causes, presentation, and management of coronary perforation in the present era of aggressive interventional cardiology. Coronary perforations are classified as type I (extraluminal crater), II (myocardial or pericardial blushing), and III (contrast streaming or cavity spilling). Types I and II coronary perforations are caused by stiff or hydrophilic guidewires. Type I has a benign prognosis, whereas type II coronary perforations have the potential to progress to tamponade. Type III coronary perforations are caused by balloons, stents, or other intracoronary devices and commonly lead to cardiac tamponade necessitating pericardial drainage. However, type III perforations can be managed with covered stents without need for surgical intervention.
doi:10.4103/1995-705X.86017
PMCID: PMC3221194  PMID: 22121463
Cardiac tamponade; coronary perforation; covered stent
15.  Relationship Between Admitting Nonfasting Blood Glucose and In-Hospital Mortality Stratified by Diabetes Mellitus Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in Oman 
Background and Objectives:
Hyperglycemia in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is associated with increased in-hospital mortality. We evaluated the relationship between admitting (nonfasting) blood glucose and in-hospital mortality in patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) presenting with ACS in Oman.
Patients and Methods:
Data were analyzed from 1551 consecutive patients admitted to 15 hospitals throughout Oman, with the final diagnosis of ACS during May 8, 2006 to June 6, 2006 and January 29, 2007 to June 29, 2007, as part of Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events. Admitting blood glucose was divided into four groups, namely, euglycemia (≤7 mmol/l), mild hyperglycemia (>7-<9 mmol/l), moderate hyperglycemia (≥9-<11 - mmol/l), and severe hyperglycemia (≥11 mmol/l).
Results:
Of all, 38% (n = 584) and 62% (n = 967) of the patients were documented with and without a history of DM, respectively. Nondiabetic patients with severe hyperglycemia were associated with significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared with those with euglycemia (13.1 vs 1.52%; P<0.001), mild hyperglycemia (13.1 vs 3.62%; P = 0.003), and even moderate hyperglycemia (13.1 vs 4.17%; P = 0.034). Even after multivariate adjustment, severe hyperglycemia was still associated with higher in-hospital mortality when compared with both euglycemia (odds ratio [OR], 6.3; P<0.001) and mild hyperglycemia (OR, 3.43; P = 0.011). No significant relationship was noted between admitting blood glucose and in-hospital mortality among diabetic ACS patients even after multivariable adjustment (all P values >0.05).
Conclusion:
Admission hyperglycemia is common in ACS patients from Oman and is associated with higher in-hospital mortality among those patients with previously unreported DM.
doi:10.4103/1995-705X.81554
PMCID: PMC3123510  PMID: 21731803
Acute coronary syndrome; admission hyperglycemia; diabetes mellitus; hyperglycemia; in-hospital mortality
16.  Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Prior Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in a Large Middle Eastern Cohort 
Background:
Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) can occur in patients with prior coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In the Gulf Registry of acute coronary events (Gulf RACE), we identified the clinical characteristics and in-hospital outcomes of these patients.
Methods:
Clinical characteristics and in-hospital outcomes for 461 ACS patients with prior CABG are compared to 7715 ACS patients without prior CABG enrolled from 64 hospitals in 6 Gulf countries over a 6-month period.
Results:
The overall incidence of ACS with prior CABG was 5.6% out of 8176 patients. The ACS with prior CABG were older (63 vs 55 years, P<0.0001), had more history of diabetes (62.3 vs 37.6%, P <0.0001), dyslipidemia (70.3 vs 29.5%, P<0.0001), and hypertension (75.7 vs 47.8%, P<0.0001) compared with the non-CABG group. They presented more frequently with dyspnea (14.8 vs 9.5%, P<0.0005), non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (41.4 vs 31.6%, P<0.0001) and echocardiographic evidence of left ventricular dysfunction (49.4 vs 29.8%, P<0.0001) than ACS without prior CABG. They had a complicated in-hospital course with more recurrent ischemia (13.9 vs 9.3%, P=0.0011), heart failure (24.1 vs 15.7%), and stroke (2.2 vs 0.6%) compared with those without CABG. The in-hospital mortality rate was 5.6% in the CABG group compared with 3.5% in the ACS without prior CABG group. After adjusting for confounders, prior CABG was independently associated with recurrent ischemia and shock, more in patients presenting with ST elevation than non-ST elevation ACS.
Conclusions:
Patients with ACS and prior CABG are a high-risk group with poor outcomes irrespective of their older age and comorbidities. They should be identified and treated differently to improve their outcomes.
doi:10.2174/1874192401105010196
PMCID: PMC3170976  PMID: 21915225
Acute Coronary Syndrome; Angioplasty; Comorbidity; Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting; Risk factors; Stroke.
17.  Prevalence, Predictors, and Impact of Low High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol on in-Hospital Outcomes Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in the Middle East 
Objective:
To estimate the prevalence, predictors, and impact of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) on in-hospital outcomes among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in the Middle East.
Methods:
Data were collected prospectively from 6,266 consecutive patients admitted with a diagnosis of ACS and enrolled in the Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE). A low HDL-C was defined as a level <40 mg/Dl (1.0 mmol/L) for males and <50 mg/dL (1.3 mmol/L) for females. Analyses were performed using univariate and multivariate statistical techniques.
Results:
The overall mean age of the cohort was 56±12 years and majority were males (77%). The overall prevalence of low HDL-C was 62%. During in-hospital stay and at discharge, the majority were on statin therapy (83%) while 10% were on other cholesterol lowering agents. After adjustment of demographic and clinical characteristics, the predictors for low HDL-C were higher body mass index (BMI), prior myocardial infarction (MI), diabetes mellitus, smoking and impaired renal function. Multivariable adjustment revealed that low HDL-C was associated with higher in-hospital mortality (odds ratio (OR), 1.54; 95% CI: 1.06-2.24; p=0.022) and cardiogenic shock (OR, 1.61; 95% CI: 1.20-2.14; p=0.001).
Conclusions:
ACS patients in the Middle East have a high prevalence of low HDL-C. Higher BMI, prior MI, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and impaired renal function were predictors of low HDL-C. Significantly higher in-hospital mortality and cardiogenic shock were associated with low HDL-C in men but not in women.
doi:10.2174/1874192401105010203
PMCID: PMC3178900  PMID: 21966331
High density lipoprotein cholesterol; low density lipoprotein cholesterol; triglycerides; acute coronary syndrome; myocardial infarction; gender; Middle East.
18.  Gender-related differences in the presentation, management, and outcomes among patients with acute coronary syndrome from Oman 
Objective
To assess gender-related differences in the presentation, management, and in-hospital outcomes among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients from Oman.
Methods
Data were analyzed from 1579 consecutive ACS patients from Oman during May 8, 2006 to June 6, 2006 and January 29, 2007 to June 29, 2007, as part of Gulf RACE (Registry of Acute Coronary Events). Analyses were conducted using univariate and multivariate statistical techniques.
Results
In this study, 608 (39%) patients were women with mean age 62 ± 12 vs. 57 ± 13 years (p < 0.001). More women were seen in the older age groups (age <55 years: 25% vs. 43%, 55–74 years: 60% vs. 49% and >75 years: 15% vs. 8%; p < 0.001). Women had higher frequencies of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, angina, and aspirin use, but less history of smoking. Women were significantly less likely to have ischemic chest pain, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-STEMI and were more likely to have dyspnea, unstable angina, ST depression and left bundle branch block. Both groups received ACS medications and cardiac catheterization equally; however, women received anticoagulants (88% vs. 79%; p < 0.001), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) (70% vs. 65%; p = 0.050) more and clopidogrel less (20% vs. 29%; p < 0.001). Women experienced more recurrent ischemia and heart failure but with similar in-hospital mortality (4.6% vs. 4.3%) even after adjusting for age (p = 0.500).
Conclusions
Women admitted with ACS were older than men, had more risk factors, presented differently with no difference in hospital mortality. This is similar to Gulf RACE study except for mortality. Women received anticoagulants/ACEIs /ARBs more but were under-treated with clopidogrel.
doi:10.1016/j.jsha.2010.09.003
PMCID: PMC3727510  PMID: 23960630
Gender-related differences; Women; Acute coronary syndrome; Oman
19.  In-hospital Major Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Renal Insufficiency Presenting With Acute Coronary Syndrome: Data From a Registry of 8176 Patients 
Mayo Clinic Proceedings  2010;85(4):332-340.
OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) on in-hospital major adverse cardiac events across the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) spectrum.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 29, 2007, through July 29, 2007, 6 adjacent Middle Eastern countries participated in the Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events, a prospective, observational registry of 8176 patients. Patients were categorized according to estimated glomerular filtration rate into 4 groups: normal (≥90 mL/min), mild (60-89 mL/min), moderate (30-59 mL/min), and severe CRI (<30 mL/min). Patients' characteristics and in-hospital major adverse cardiac events in the 4 groups were analyzed.
RESULTS: Of 6518 consecutive patients with ACS, 2828 (43%) had mild CRI, 1304 (20%) had moderate CRI, and 345 (5%) had severe CRI. In CRI groups, patients were older and had a higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. On admission, these patients had a higher resting heart rate and frequently had atypical and delayed presentations. Compared with the normal estimated glomerular filtration group, CRI groups were less likely to receive antiplatelet drugs, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins and were less likely to undergo coronary angiography. In-hospital heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and major bleeding episodes were significantly higher in all CRI groups. In multivariate analysis, mild, moderate, and severe CRI were associated with a higher adjusted odds ratio (OR) of death (mild: OR, 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-3.7; moderate: OR, 6.7; 95% CI, 3.9-11.5; and severe: OR, 12.0; 95% CI, 6.6-21.7).
CONCLUSION: Across the ACS spectrum, patients with CRI had a worse risk profile, had more atypical and delayed presentations, and were less likely to receive evidence-based therapy. Chronic renal insufficiency of varying stages is an independent predictor of in-hospital morbidity and mortality.
Across the acute coronary syndrome spectrum, patients with chronic renal insufficiency had a worse profile, had more atypical and delayed presentations, and were less likely to receive evidence-based therapy; chronic renal insufficiency of varying stages is an independent predictor of in-hospital morbidity and mortality.
doi:10.4065/mcp.2009.0513
PMCID: PMC2848421  PMID: 20360292
20.  Acute Coronary Syndrome in Young Adults from Oman: Results from the Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events 
Objective:
To assess the prevalence, risk factors, presenting features, and in-hospital outcomes of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients ≤40 years of age from Oman.
Methods:
Data were analyzed from 1579 consecutive ACS patients from Oman during May, 2006 to June, 2007, as part of Gulf RACE (Registry of Acute Coronary Events). ACS patients ≤40 years of age were compared with patients >40 years of age.
Results:
A total of 121 (7.6%) patients were ≤40 years of age with mean age of 36 ± 4 vs. 61 ± 11 years in young and old adults, respectively (P<0.001). More men were seen in the younger age group (81 vs. 60%; P<0.001). Among all the coronary risk factors, young patients had more history of smoking (47 vs. 15%; P<0.001), obesity (72 vs. 58%; P = 0.009), and family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) (16 vs. 7%; P = 0.001). Both groups received aspirin, statins, thrombolytic therapy, and anticoagulants equally; however, younger patients received clopidogrel, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, β-blockers, and in-hospital coronary angiogram more. Younger patients experienced less heart failure (6 vs. 27%; P<0.001) and in-hospital mortality, especially among STEMI patients (0 vs. 10%; P = 0.037).
Conclusions:
Young ACS patients from Oman have different risk profile. They were treated more aggressively and their outcome was better, which is similar to other populations. However, smoking, along with obesity and family history of CAD were strong risk factors in the young Omani ACS patients. There is a need for prevention programmes to control smoking and obesity epidemic by targeting young adults in the population.
doi:10.4103/1995-705X.76799
PMCID: PMC3089825  PMID: 21577375
Acute coronary syndrome; Oman; smoking; young adults
21.  Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis in an Intravenous Drug Abuser Masquerading as Pulmonary Tuberculosis 
Intravenous drug abuse contributes to considerable illness burden in developed and developing countries. Tricuspid valve endocarditis (TVE) is rare in Middle East countries, though many reports of it in intravenous drug abusers are found in other countries. We describe a case of TVE mimicking pulmonary tuberculosis in a 33-year-old man with a history of intravenous heroin use.
doi:10.4103/1995-705X.76805
PMCID: PMC3089828  PMID: 21577381
Intravenous Drug Abuse; Infective endocarditis; Right-sided Endocarditis; Staphylococcus aureus; Septic Pulmonary Emboli; Tricuspid valve endocarditis
22.  Immediate and Six-month Clinical Outcome of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in a Tertiary Hospital in the Sultanate of Oman 
Oman Medical Journal  2008;23(4):247-252.
Objectives
To evaluate the clinical characteristics, angiographic profile, in-hospital and six-month clinical outcome of patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention in a tertiary hospital in the Sultanate of Oman.
Methods
Two hundred and five consecutive patients with both acute coronary syndrome and stable coronary artery disease, who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention between January 2007 and June 2007, were retrospectively analyzed. Follow-up information was obtained from outpatient visits of these patients at six-months.
Main outcome measures
The primary end point in this study was the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as cardiac death, any myocardial infarction (MI), cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and target vessel revascularization (TVR) with either repeat percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). Secondary end points included angiographic success rate, procedural success rate, angina status, and the rate of clinical and angiographic restenosis.
Results
The angiographic and procedural success rate was 98% and 95% respectively. Fifty-one percent of patients surveyed had single vessel disease, 34% had double vessel disease and triple vessel disease was seen in 15% of patients. Type A lesion was found in 16%, Type B in 55% and Type C in 29% of patients. The majority of patients had single vessel stenting (83%). The mean ± SD number of stents per patient was 1.6 ± 0.9.There were four in-hospital deaths (2%) and six patients (2.9%) had non-ST elevation myocardial infarction before hospital discharge. Out of 205 patients, 53 patients were lost to follow-up. Among the 148 patients followed up, 105 patients (71%) were asymptomatic at follow-up, 36 (24%) patients had stable angina and 7 (5%) had a late myocardial infarction including three patients with stent thrombosis (2%). Among the 43 patients with angina or late infarction, 28 patients underwent coronary angiogram. Angiographic in-stent restenosis was seen in 14 patients. Of them, 8 patients underwent CABG and 6 patients repeat PCI. Fourteen patients had patent stents.The remaining fifteen patients were on optimal medications including two patients with stent thrombosis as they refused coronary angiogram. Overall, 132 of 148 patients (105 asymptomatic/14 patent stents/13 with angina) (89%) were free from major adverse cardiac events. Considering anginal status and repeat angiograms, composite clinical (15 patients) and angiographic (14 patients) six-month restenosis rate in percutaneous coronary intervention patients (29/148) was 19.5%.
Conclusion
Results of percutaneous coronary intervention in our setup is excellent with good immediate results, low complication rate, good six-month clinical outcome and is comparable to international standards.
PMCID: PMC3273916  PMID: 22334836
Percutaneous coronary intervention; Major adverse cardiovascular events; Stent; Clinical restenosis; Angiographic restenosis

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