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author:("Zhou, tidying")
1.  Sporadic hemiplegic migraine with permanent neurological deficits 
Headache  2013;54(1):163-166.
By definition, the neurologic impairments of hemiplegic migraine are reversible. However, a few cases of permanent neurologic deficits associated with hemiplegic migraine have been reported. Herein we present the case of a patient with permanent impairments due to hemiplegic migraine despite normalization of associated brain MRI abnormalities. Cases like these suggest the need to consider aggressive prophylactic therapy for patients with recurrent hemiplegic migraine attacks.
doi:10.1111/head.12232
PMCID: PMC4220590  PMID: 24117121
hemiplegic migraine; migraine; persistent neurologic deficits
2.  Lower Levels of Circulating Progenitor Cells Are Associated With Low Physical Function and Performance in Elderly Men With Impaired Glucose Tolerance: A Pilot Substudy From the VA Enhanced Fitness Trial 
Background.
Aging is marked by a decline in physical function. Although the biological underpinnings for this remain unclear, loss of regenerative capacity has been proposed as one cause of the loss of physical function that occurs over time. The quantity of circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) may be one reflection of regenerative capability. We sought to determine whether certain specific CPC subpopulations were associated with physical function.
Methods.
Baseline CPCs were measured in 129 randomized participants in the Enhanced Fitness clinical trial based on the cell surface markers CD34, CD133, CD146, and CD14 and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. Physical function was assessed using usual and rapid gait speed, 6-minute walk distance, chair stand time, and balance time.
Results.
Low counts of early angiogenic CPCs identified as CD34+, CD34+CD133+, and ALDH-bright (ALDHbr) cells were associated with low usual gait speed (p < .005, p < .001, and p < .007), rapid gait speed (p < .001, p < .003, and p < .001), and 6-minute walking distance (all comparisons p < .001), and longer time required to complete five chair stands (p < .006, p < .002, and p < .004). CPC counts of mature endothelial or monocytic markers were not associated with physical function.
Conclusions.
The numbers of CD34+ and ALDHbr CPCs are significantly lower in patients with impaired physical function. Further studies are needed to determine the underlying causes for this association.
doi:10.1093/gerona/glt067
PMCID: PMC3814238  PMID: 23682163
Endothelial progenitor cells; Physical performance; Physical function; Aging; Progenitor cells biology.
3.  Depletion of Circulating Progenitor Cells Precedes Overt Diabetes: A Substudy from the VA Enhanced Fitness Trial 
Journal of diabetes and its complications  2013;27(6):10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2013.08.004.
Background
One theory of aging and disease development is that chronic injury (pathology) results in activation of regenerative processes and initial repair, with overt disease arising only after exhaustion of reparative capability leads to inadequate repair. While depletion of circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) has been noted in diabetes, the degree to which CPC depletion predates and is associated with propensity to develop overt disease is unclear.
Methods
The Enhanced Fitness trial enrolled overweight/obese (body mass index >25) sedentary patients with glucose intolerance but without overt diabetes. Baseline CPCs were measured in 129 patients based on the cell surface markers CD34, CD133, and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. HgbA1C, fasting insulin and glucose levels, and HOMA calculations were ascertained.
Results
Lower counts of early angiogenic CPCs identified as CD34+, CD34+CD133+, and ALDH-bright (ALDHbr) cells were associated with impairments in glucose homeostasis as reflected by HgbA1C, but not fasting insulin, glucose, or HOMA-IR. These associations remained when corrected for age and cardiovascular risk factors.
Conclusions/Interpretation
The numbers of CD34+ and ALDHbr CPCs were significantly lower in patients with impaired glucose tolerance. Depletion of reparative capacity as reflected by loss of CPCs may presage overt disease as exemplified in this pre-diabetes model.
Clinical Trials Registration
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00594399
doi:10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2013.08.004
PMCID: PMC3874717  PMID: 24055327
4.  EPC mobilization after erythropoietin treatment in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: the REVEAL EPC substudy 
Erythropoietin (EPO) was hypothesized to mitigate reperfusion injury, in part via mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The REVEAL trial found no reduction in infarct size with a single dose of EPO (60,000 U) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. In a substudy, we aimed to determine the feasibility of cryopreserving and centrally analyzing EPC levels to assess the relationship between EPC numbers, EPO administration, and infarct size. As a prespecified substudy, mononuclear cells were locally cryopreserved before as well as 24 and 48–72 h after primary percutaneous coronary intervention. EPC samples were collected in 163 of 222 enrolled patients. At least one sample was obtained from 125 patients, and all three time points were available in 83 patients. There were no significant differences in the absolute EPC numbers over time or between EPO- and placebo-treated patients; however, there was a trend toward a greater increase in EPC levels from 24 to 48–72 h postintervention in patients receiving ≥30,000 U of EPO (P = 0.099 for CD133+ cells, 0.049 for CD34+ cells, 0.099 for ALDHbr cells). EPC numbers at baseline were inversely related to infarct size (P = 0.03 for CD133+ cells, 0.006 for CD34+ cells). Local whole cell cryopreservation and central EPC analysis in the context of a multicenter randomized trial is feasible but challenging. High-dose (≥30,000 U) EPO may mobilize EPCs at 48–72 h, and baseline EPC levels may be inversely associated with infarct size.
doi:10.1007/s11239-013-0944-6
PMCID: PMC4008147  PMID: 23700090
Erythropoietin; Endothelial progenitor cells; Myocardial infarction; Cryopreservation
5.  Elevated blood pressure and analgesic overuse in chronic daily headache: an outpatient clinic-based study from China 
Background
Many studies have reported that hypertension is common in chronic daily headache (CDH) and its subtype chronic migraine (CM), but the reason is still poorly understood. Our clinical literature review suggested that analgesic overuse may be associated with elevated blood pressure (BP), so we performed the present study to investigate the frequency of elevated BP and its link with analgesic overuse in CDH and its subtypes.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted in neurology outpatients with a diagnosis of CDH according to International Headache Society criteria. CDH patients were classified into CM and non-CM groups, and subclassified with or without analgesic overuse.
Results
Elevated BP was present in 27.96% of CDH patients. Compared with non-CM patients, patients with CM had a longer duration of headache and more severe pain intensity, and a family history of headache and analgesic overuse were also more common, but the elevated BP frequency was not different between the two groups. Almost one-third of the patients had analgesic overuse; 96.8% of which comprised acetaminophen-containing agents. Those with analgesic overuse had a higher frequency of headache than those without analgesic overuse in both the CM and non-CM groups.
Conclusions
Although the CM patients had a longer duration of headache, more severe intensity, the frequency of elevated BP wasn’t higher than non-CM group. Analgesic overuses maybe the reason of higher frequency of elevated BP in CDH and its subtypes. This may have predictive value for clinicians to improve CDH management.
doi:10.1186/1129-2377-14-51
PMCID: PMC3691651  PMID: 23773858
Acetaminophen; Analgesic overuse; Chronic daily headache; Elevated blood pressure
6.  Prevalence and risk factors for depression and anxiety among outpatient migraineurs in mainland China 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2012;13(4):303-310.
This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors for anxiety and depression symptoms in outpatient migraineurs in mainland China. In addition, we evaluated whether the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) provided sufficient validity to screen depression and anxiety. A cross-sectional study was conducted consecutively at our headache clinic. Migraine was diagnosed according to International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-II). Demographic characteristics and clinical features were collected by headache questionnaire. Anxiety and depression symptoms about migraineurs were assessed using HADS. Several questionnaires were simultaneously used to evaluate patients with depressive disorder including the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA) and HADS. Pearson correlation analysis was applied to test the validity of HADS. 176 outpatients with migraine (81.8 % female) were included. Overall, 17.6 and 38.1 % participants had depression and anxiety, respectively. Possible risk factors for depression in migraineurs included headache intensity of first onset of migraine, migraine with presymptom, migraine with family history and migraine disability. The possible risk factors for anxiety included fixed attack time of headache in one day and poor sleeping, and age represented a protective factor for anxiety. The correlation coefficient of HADS-A and HADS-D with HAMA and HAMD was 0.666 and 0.508, respectively (P < 0.01). This study demonstrates that depression and anxiety comorbidity in our mainland Chinese migraineurs are also common, and several risk factors were identified that may provide predictive value. These findings can help clinicians to identify and treat anxiety and depression in order to improve migraine management.
doi:10.1007/s10194-012-0442-9
PMCID: PMC3356469  PMID: 22466285
Anxiety; Cross-sectional study; Depression; Migraine; Risk factor
7.  Aging Is Not Associated With Bone Marrow–Resident Progenitor Cell Depletion 
Changes in progenitor cell biology remain at the forefront of many theories of biologic aging, but there are limited studies evaluating this in humans. Aging has been associated with a progressive depletion of circulating progenitor cells, but age-related bone marrow–resident progenitor cell depletion has not been systematically determined in humans. Patients undergoing total hip replacement were consented, and bone marrow and peripheral progenitor cells were enumerated based on aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and CD34 and CD133 expression. Circulating progenitors demonstrated an age-dependent decline. In contrast, marrow-resident progenitor cell content demonstrated no age association with any progenitor cell subtype. In humans, aging is associated with depletion of circulating, but not marrow-resident, progenitors. This finding has impact on the mechanism(s) responsible for age-related changes in circulating stem cells and important implications for the use of autologous marrow for the treatment of age-related diseases.
doi:10.1093/gerona/glq110
PMCID: PMC2949333  PMID: 20591876
Bone marrow; Progenitor cell; Endothelial progenitor cells; Aging; Circulating progenitor cell
8.  Classification and clinical features of headache patients: an outpatient clinic study from China 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2011;12(5):561-567.
This study aimed to analyze and classify the clinical features of headache in neurological outpatients. A cross-sectional study was conducted consecutively from March to May 2010 for headache among general neurological outpatients attending the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University. Personal interviews were carried out and a questionnaire was used to collect medical records. Diagnosis of headache was according to the International classification of headache disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-II). Headache patients accounted for 19.5% of the general neurology clinic outpatients. A total of 843 (50.1%) patients were defined as having primary headache, 454 (27%) secondary headache, and 386 (23%) headache not otherwise specified (headache NOS). For primary headache, 401 (23.8%) had migraine, 399 (23.7%) tension-type headache (TTH), 8 (0.5%) cluster headache and 35 (2.1%) other headache types. Overall, migraine patients suffered (1) more severe headache intensity, (2) longer than 6 years of headache history and (3) more common analgesic medications use than TTH ones (p < 0.001).TTH patients had more frequent episodes of headaches than migraine patients, and typically headache frequency exceeded 15 days/month (p < 0.001); 22.8% of primary headache patients were defined as chronic daily headache. Almost 20% of outpatient visits to the general neurology department were of headache patients, predominantly primary headache of migraine and TTH. In outpatient headaches, more attention should be given to headache intensity and duration of headache history for migraine patients, while more attention to headache frequency should be given for the TTH ones.
doi:10.1007/s10194-011-0360-2
PMCID: PMC3173628  PMID: 21744226
Outpatient; Headache; Cross-sectional study; Clinical feature; Migraine
9.  Classification and clinical features of headache patients: an outpatient clinic study from China 
The Journal of Headache and Pain  2011;12(5):561-567.
This study aimed to analyze and classify the clinical features of headache in neurological outpatients. A cross-sectional study was conducted consecutively from March to May 2010 for headache among general neurological outpatients attending the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University. Personal interviews were carried out and a questionnaire was used to collect medical records. Diagnosis of headache was according to the International classification of headache disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-II). Headache patients accounted for 19.5% of the general neurology clinic outpatients. A total of 843 (50.1%) patients were defined as having primary headache, 454 (27%) secondary headache, and 386 (23%) headache not otherwise specified (headache NOS). For primary headache, 401 (23.8%) had migraine, 399 (23.7%) tension-type headache (TTH), 8 (0.5%) cluster headache and 35 (2.1%) other headache types. Overall, migraine patients suffered (1) more severe headache intensity, (2) longer than 6 years of headache history and (3) more common analgesic medications use than TTH ones (p < 0.001).TTH patients had more frequent episodes of headaches than migraine patients, and typically headache frequency exceeded 15 days/month (p < 0.001); 22.8% of primary headache patients were defined as chronic daily headache. Almost 20% of outpatient visits to the general neurology department were of headache patients, predominantly primary headache of migraine and TTH. In outpatient headaches, more attention should be given to headache intensity and duration of headache history for migraine patients, while more attention to headache frequency should be given for the TTH ones.
doi:10.1007/s10194-011-0360-2
PMCID: PMC3173628  PMID: 21744226
Outpatient; Headache; Cross-sectional study; Clinical feature; Migraine

Results 1-9 (9)