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1.  Impact of Eating Probiotic Yogurt on Colonization by Candida Species of the Oral and Vaginal Mucosa in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women 
Mycopathologia  2013;176(0):175-181.
Background
Candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients continues to be a public health problem. Antifungal therapies are not always effective and may result in complications, such as the development of drug-resistant strains of Candida species.
Objectives
This study evaluated the impact of probiotic consumption on Candida colonization of the oral and vaginal mucosa.
Patients/Methods
A pilot study was conducted in 24 women (17 HIV-infected, 7 HIV-uninfected) from the Women's Interagency HIV Study. The women underwent a 60-day initiation period with no probiotic consumption, followed by two 15-day consumption periods, with a different probiotic yogurt (DanActive™ or YoPlus™ yogurt) during each interval. There was a 30-day washout period between the two yogurt consumption periods. Oral and vaginal culture swabs were collected on days 0, 60, 74, and 120. Candida was detected by inoculating each swab in both Sabouraud's dextrose agar with or without chloramphenicol and CHROMagar.
Results
Less fungal colonization among women was observed when the women consumed probiotic yogurts (54 % of the women had vaginal fungal colonization during the non-probiotic yogurt consumption period, 29 % during the DanActive™ period, and 38 % during YoPlus™ yogurt consumption period), and HIV-infected women had significantly lower vaginal fungal colonization after they consumed DanActive™ yogurt compared to the nonintervention periods (54 vs 29 %, p = 0.03).
Conclusions
These data are promising, but as expected in a small pilot study, there were some significant changes but also some areas where colonization was not changed. This type of conflicting data is supportive of the need for a larger trial to further elucidate the role of probiotic yogurts in fungal growth in HIV-infected women.
doi:10.1007/s11046-013-9678-4
PMCID: PMC3903393  PMID: 23925786
Probiotics; Vulvovaginal candidiasis; Oral candidiasis; Candida; HIV; Opportunistic infections
2.  Fluconazole Resistance Patterns in Candida Species that Colonize Women with HIV Infection 
Background
The Women’s Interagency HIV Study was established in 1993 to study the natural history of HIV disease among women in the United States. It currently has enrolled 2,895 women testing positive for HIV infection and 972 women without HIV infection recruited from 6 national metropolitan locations. The clinical database information collected for each HIV-positive individual included CD4 cell counts, viral load, and antiviral treatment to evaluate HIV prognosis and related conditions in women.
Objective
To provide a baseline for fluconazole treatment prospects in women who test positive for HIV infection. As part of the ongoing Women’s Interagency HIV Study project, we investigated the fluconazole susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from women with HIV in comparison to volunteer women without HIV. The implication of antifungal treatment on fluconazole susceptibility was evaluated by reviewing antifungal medication use for the past 2 years in each participant. In addition, genotyping of Candida spp. at oral and vaginal sites was monitored for 4 months in 9 patients.
Methods
In a cohort of 59 women with HIV and 24 women without HIV, colonization by Candida albicans and non-albicans species of the oral and vaginal sites was first determined. Fluconazole susceptibility was surveyed in vitro according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute protocol. Antifungal drug treatment history was investigated for each patient to correspond with fluconazole susceptibility. Finally, series of isolates from several patients were followed for resistance and susceptibility. Their lineage was verified by genotyping multilocus sequence typing (MLST).
Results
A total of 280 Candida strains were recovered from oral and vaginal swabs of women with and without HIV infection. We found that patients with HIV were colonized with Candida spp. more frequently than women without HIV. The percent of isolates that were susceptibility dose dependent or resistant to fluconazole was higher in Candida glabrata compared with C. albicans isolates, but higher for C. albicans than other published data. Resistance was noted to be more common in vaginal sites. Fluconazole resistance in either species was not associated with relative CD4 cell counts or viral load. However an association with systemic application of fluconazole and resistance was noted.
Conclusions
Systemic antifungal therapy, including a vaginal topical regimen in women with HIV infection correlated with reduced fluconazole susceptibility of oral and vaginal isolates. Genotype profiling has disclosed that a majority of isolates from the same individual are clustered together, suggesting the likelihood of an original strain with some microevolution. We observed a change from a susceptibility dose dependent to a resistant phenotype of isolates in 2 women with HIV infection, even though no treatments were received during the 4-month study and the prior 2 years.
doi:10.1016/j.curtheres.2014.07.002
PMCID: PMC4209509  PMID: 25352939
Candida spp; fluconazole resistance; HIV-positive women
3.  Colonization by Candida Species of the Oral and Vaginal Mucosa in HIV-Infected and Noninfected Women 
Abstract
Candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients continues to be a public health problem. Effective antifungal therapies are few in number and have inherent problems such as selecting for drug-resistant strains of Candida species. To evaluate the state of Candida colonization of the oral and vaginal mucosa, we recruited 80 women, both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected, from the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Diet diaries were collected by participants to examine the role of diet on fungal growth. Baseline studies were initially done in participants that followed the colonization of both mucosal sites over 0–90 days. The most common Candida species from both groups of patients were C. albicans and C. glabrata. Among the HIV-infected cohort, the percentage of participants who were positive for Candida spp. was higher than in the HIV-uninfected control group. Furthermore, the frequency of colonization (1 episode versus >1 episode) was also increased in the HIV-infected cohort. These data indicate that Candida species remain an important component of the microbial community in both populations.
doi:10.1089/aid.2012.0269
PMCID: PMC3537294  PMID: 23098053
4.  Effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy and its adherence on herpes zoster incidence: a longitudinal cohort study 
Background
Herpes zoster (HZ) is common among HIV-infected individuals, but the impacts of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and HAART adherence on HZ risk have not been well studied.
Methods
The effects of HAART and HAART adherence on HZ incidence were evaluated by comparing HIV-infected women on HAART (HAART use group) with the HIV-infected women remaining HAART naïve (HAART naïve group) in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). A 1:1 matching with propensity score for predicting HAART initiation was conducted to balance background covariates at index visit, including HIV disease stage. Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare the risk of HZ development between the matched pairs. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the effects of HAART and HAART adherence on HZ incidence.
Results
Through propensity score matching, 389 pairs of participants were identified and they contributed 3,909 person years after matching. The background covariates were similar between the matched pairs at the index visit. The participants had a mean age around 39 years old, and about 61% of them were Black and 22% were Latina. No significant difference in HZ risk was observed between the HAART use group and the HAART naïve group during the first year of follow-up in any analyses. In the univariate analysis, the HAART use group had marginally lower HZ risk (Hazard Ratio (HR): 0.72; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.48-1.1) over the entire follow-up period. However, women with a HAART adherence level of ≥95% had significantly lower HZ risk (HR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.31, 0.94) compared to the HAART naïve women. The association remained significant after adjusting for quality of life score and acyclovir use, but it attenuated and was no longer statistically significant after adjusting for an intermediate variable, either CD4+ T cell counts or HIV viral load.
Conclusions
Among adult women, we observed a significant preventive effect of long-term HAART use on HZ incidence when a HAART adherence level of ≥95% was attained, and this effect was mediated through reduction of HIV viral load and improvement of CD4+ T cell counts.
doi:10.1186/1742-6405-10-34
PMCID: PMC3904465  PMID: 24373482
HAART; Adherence; Herpes zoster; Incidence; Propensity score
5.  Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of paclitaxel loaded in six-arm star-shaped poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) 
Background
Star-shaped polymers provide more terminal groups, and are promising for application in drug-delivery systems.
Methods
A new series of six-arm star-shaped poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (6-s-PLGA) was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization. The structure and properties of the 6-s-PLGA were characterized by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, and differential scanning calorimetry. Then, paclitaxel-loaded six-arm star-shaped poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (6-s-PLGA-PTX-NPs) were prepared under the conditions optimized by the orthogonal testing. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to analyze the nanoparticles’ encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading capacity, dynamic light scattering was used to determine their size and size distribution, and transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate their morphology. The release performance of the 6-s-PLGA-PTX-NPs in vitro and the cytostatic effect of 6-s-PLGA-PTX-NPs were investigated in comparison with paclitaxel-loaded linear poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (L-PLGA-PTX-NPs).
Results
The results of carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy suggest that the polymerization was successfully initiated by inositol and confirm the structure of 6-s-PLGA. The molecular weights of a series of 6-s-PLGAs had a ratio corresponding to the molar ratio of raw materials to initiator. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the 6-s-PLGA had a low glass transition temperature of 40°C–50°C. The 6-s-PLGA-PTX-NPs were monodispersed with an average diameter of 240.4±6.9 nm in water, which was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The encapsulation efficiency of the 6-s-PLGA-PTX-NPs was higher than that of the L-PLGA-PTX-NPs. In terms of the in vitro release of nanoparticles, paclitaxel (PTX) was released more slowly and more steadily from 6-s-PLGA than from linear poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid). In the cytostatic study, the 6-s-PLGA-PTX-NPs and L-PLGA-PTX-NPs were found to have a similar antiproliferative effect, which indicates durable efficacy due to the slower release of the PTX when loaded in 6-s-PLGA.
Conclusion
The results suggest that 6-s-PLGA may be promising for application in PTX delivery to enhance sustained antiproliferative therapy.
doi:10.2147/IJN.S51629
PMCID: PMC3825676  PMID: 24235829
PTX; polymer; drug delivery; nanoparticles; PLGA; antiproliferative therapy
6.  An Investigation of the Possible Interaction between the Use of Vitamin C and Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) Adherence and Effectiveness in Treated HIV+ Women 
Objectives
Our goal in this study was to examine how Vitamin C interacts with antiretroviral therapy in individuals with HIV. We specifically evaluated how Vitamin C impacts highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence and HAART effectiveness as adjudicated by HIV viral loads and CD4 cell counts. Women served as their own controls, comparing periods of Vitamin C usage with periods of non-usage.
Design
An intra-individual, cross-sectional comparative study ‘nested’ in the WIHS observational cohort study
Subjects
Women in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS).
Outcome Measures
Adherence, CD4 count and Viral load.
Results
Our study population was drawn from 2,813 HIV+ participants who contributed 44,588 visits in WIHS from October, 1994 to April, 2009. Among them, there were 1,122 Vitamin C users with 4,954 total visits where use was reported. In the multivariate model adjusting for age, education, race, income, drug use, Vitamin C use order and depression score, there was a 44% increase in the odds of >=95% HAART adherence among participants during their period of Vitamin C use compared to when they were not using Vitamin C (OR=1.44; 95% CI=1.1–1.9; P-value=0.0179). There was an association with Vitamin C usage and CD4 counts on viral loads.
Conclusion
Vitamin C usage appears to be associated with improved adherence. Future Vitamin C studies should target specific HAART drugs, and prospective clinical outcomes.
doi:10.1016/j.ctim.2012.03.001
PMCID: PMC3351689  PMID: 22579434
7.  Short-term Garlic Supplementation and Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence, CD4+ Cell Counts, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viral Load 
Context
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals frequently have consumed garlic, a popular complementary supplement. Researchers rarely have studied garlic’s association with antiretroviral therapies, however, even though that association is very relevant clinically.
Objective
To examine associations of supplemental use of garlic with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) adherence level and HAART effectiveness (HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts) in HIV-infected women.
Design
The research team carried out a self-controlled, longitudinal study nested within the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). The team used a paired study design that allowed participants to serve as their own controls. The team first identified all of the study’s visits in which the participant self-reported the use of a garlic supplement since her last visit (index visit). Then for each index visit, the team identified a matching visit (a control visit) using the following criteria: (a) the visit must be one for the same participant in which that participant reported no garlic supplementation; (b) the visit must immediately precede the index visit (less than 1 year apart); and (c) at the time of the control visit, the participant must have been using antiretroviral therapy identical to that used at the time of the index visit.
Participants
Participants were persons using garlic supplementation who already were participants in the WIHS.
Outcome Measures
The research team used a logistic regression model to examine the association between garlic supplementation and HAART adherence level. The team used a mixed linear model to examine the association of garlic supplementation with HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts.
Results
From October 1994 to April 2009, 390 HIV-infected women in the WIHS made 1112 visits at which they reported using garlic supplements. Seventy-seven HIV-infected women using HAART met the research team’s selection criteria and contributed 99 pairs of visits for the study. Among the women who used garlic supplements, 22% were 50 years and older; 58% were black and non-Hispanic; and 23% had less than a high-school education. Neither use of garlic supplementation nor reasons for using garlic supplements were significantly associated with the HAART adherence level, HIV viral load, or CD4+ cell counts; however, “use garlic as needed,” a potential marker of a disease state, was significantly associated with higher viral load (P = .0003).
Conclusion
Short-term garlic supplementation did not impact HAART adherence level, HIV viral load, and CD4+ cell counts.
PMCID: PMC3376904  PMID: 22516847

Results 1-7 (7)