PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-5 (5)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
2.  Depressed Mood Mediates Decline in Cognitive Processing Speed in Caregivers 
The Gerontologist  2009;49(1):12-22.
Purpose: Very few studies have examined cognitive decline in caregivers versus noncaregivers, and only 1 study has examined mediators of such decline. We evaluated the relationship between caregiver status and decline on the digit symbol test (DST; a measure of processing speed, attention, cognitive–motor translation, and visual scanning) and whether this relationship was mediated by depressed mood. Design and Methods: Caregivers for spouses with Alzheimer's disease (n = 122) were compared with demographically similar noncaregiver spouses (n = 117) at study entry (Time 1 = T1), T2 (1 year later), and T3 (2 years after T1). Results: Caregivers had lower DST scores and higher Hamilton depression scores at T1, T2, and T3 than noncaregivers (all p < .05). Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that although caregivers started well below noncaregivers, they experienced a more rapid rate of decline than noncaregivers (p = .047). Caregivers declined 4.5 times faster than noncaregivers. Greater depressed mood at T1 (p < .01) and T2 (p < .01) predicted DST decline and mediated DST decline in caregivers vs. noncaregivers. Implications: Depressed mood in caregivers relative to noncaregivers may influence their greater risk for DST decline. This is important because the DST predicts problem solving and everyday functions necessary for independent living and the potential well-being of their care recipients.
doi:10.1093/geront/gnp004
PMCID: PMC2664616  PMID: 19363000
Stress; Caregiving; Depression; Cognition; Processing speed; Attention
3.  A Person-Focused Analysis of Resilience Resources and Coping in Diabetes Patients 
This study investigated the resilience resources and coping profiles of diabetes patients. A total of 145 patients with diabetes completed a questionnaire packet including two measurements of coping (COPE and Coping Styles questionnaires), and personal resources. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was also assessed. Resilience was defined by a factor score derived from measures of self-esteem, self-efficacy, self-mastery, and optimism. All of the maladaptive coping subscales were negatively associated with resilience (r's range from −.34 to −.56, all p's <.001). Of the adaptive coping subscales, only acceptance, emotional support, and pragmatism were positively associated with resilience. The upper, middle, and lower tertiles of the resilience factor were identified and the coping profiles of these groups differed significantly, with low resilience patients favoring maladaptive strategies much more than those with high or moderate resilience resources. Resilience groups did not differ in HbA1c levels; correlation coefficients of the coping subscales with HbA1c were explored. This study demonstrates a link between maladaptive coping and low resilience, suggesting that resilience impacts one's ability to manage the difficult treatment and lifestyle requirements of diabetes.
PMCID: PMC2880488  PMID: 20526415
Diabetes; Resilience; Coping; HbA1c
4.  The role of resilience on psychological adjustment and physical health in patients with diabetes 
British journal of health psychology  2007;13(Pt 2):311-325.
Objective
This study used a longitudinal design to investigate the buffering role of resilience on worsening HbA1c and self-care behaviours in the face of rising diabetes-related distress.
Method
A total of 111 patients with diabetes completed surveys and had their glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) assessed at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Resilience was defined by a factor score of self-esteem, self-efficacy, self-mastery, and optimism. Diabetes-related distress and self-care behaviours were also assessed.
Results
Baseline resilience, diabetes-related distress, and their interaction predicted physical health (HbA1c) at 1-year. Patients with low, moderate, and high resilience were identified. Those with low or moderate resilience levels showed a strong association between rising distress and worsening HbA1c across time (r=.57, .56, respectively). However, those with high resilience scores did not show the same associations (r=.08). Low resilience was also associated with fewer self-care behaviours when faced with increasing distress (r= −.55). These correlation coefficients remained significant after controlling for starting points.
Conclusion
In patients with diabetes, resilience resources predicted future HbA1c and buffered worsening HbA1c and self-care behaviours in the face of rising distress levels.
doi:10.1348/135910707X186994
PMCID: PMC2899486  PMID: 17535497
5.  How Does Anger Coping Style Affect Glycemic Control in Diabetes Patients? 
Background
Although various forms of anger have been found to influence the psychological and physical health in many chronic illness populations, little is known about the effects of anger in diabetes patients.
Purpose
Associations between anger coping style, diabetes-related psychological distress, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were examined in 100 diabetes patients.
Method
Participants completed the Problem Areas in Diabetes and Coping Styles questionnaires, and had HbA1c assessments at study entry (Time 1=T1), six months (T2), and 12 months after T1 (T3).
Results
Linear regression analyses revealed T1 anger coping associated with T3 HbA1c (β=.22, p<.05) but T1 HbA1c did not associate with T3 anger coping (β=.13, p=NS). After controlling for significant covariates (of gender, age, education, type and duration of diabetes), regression analyses revealed that T2 diabetes-related psychological distress partially mediated this association.
Conclusion
These results suggested that higher levels of anger coping may promote poorer HbA1c in diabetes patients by provoking greater diabetes-related distress. Areas of future research on this topic are discussed.
doi:10.1080/10705500802219481
PMCID: PMC2900155  PMID: 18696309
anger coping; psychological distress; glycemic control; diabetes

Results 1-5 (5)