PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-7 (7)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Air Pollution Exposure and Lung Function in Children: The ESCAPE Project 
Environmental Health Perspectives  2013;121(11-12):1357-1364.
Background: There is evidence for adverse effects of outdoor air pollution on lung function of children. Quantitative summaries of the effects of air pollution on lung function, however, are lacking due to large differences among studies.
Objectives: We aimed to study the association between residential exposure to air pollution and lung function in five European birth cohorts with a standardized exposure assessment following a common protocol.
Methods: As part of the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) we analyzed data from birth cohort studies situated in Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom that measured lung function at 6–8 years of age (n = 5,921). Annual average exposure to air pollution [nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOx), mass concentrations of particulate matter with diameters < 2.5, < 10, and 2.5–10 μm (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse), and PM2.5 absorbance] at the birth address and current address was estimated by land-use regression models. Associations of lung function with estimated air pollution levels and traffic indicators were estimated for each cohort using linear regression analysis, and then combined by random effects meta-analysis.
Results: Estimated levels of NO2, NOx, PM2.5 absorbance, and PM2.5 at the current address, but not at the birth address, were associated with small decreases in lung function. For example, changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) ranged from –0.86% (95% CI: –1.48, –0.24%) for a 20-μg/m3 increase in NOx to –1.77% (95% CI: –3.34, –0.18%) for a 5-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5.
Conclusions: Exposure to air pollution may result in reduced lung function in schoolchildren.
Citation: Gehring U, Gruzieva O, Agius RM, Beelen R, Custovic A, Cyrys J, Eeftens M, Flexeder C, Fuertes E, Heinrich J, Hoffmann B, de Jongste JC, Kerkhof M, Klümper C, Korek M, Mölter A, Schultz ES, Simpson A, Sugiri D, Svartengren M, von Berg A, Wijga AH, Pershagen G, Brunekreef B. 2013. Air pollution exposure and lung function in children: the ESCAPE project. Environ Health Perspect 121:1357–1364; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306770
doi:10.1289/ehp.1306770
PMCID: PMC3855518  PMID: 24076757
2.  Asthmatics Exhibit Altered Oxylipin Profiles Compared to Healthy Individuals after Subway Air Exposure 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(8):e23864.
Background
Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Air pollutants such as particulate matter (PM) and oxidants are important factors in causing exacerbations in asthmatics, and the source and composition of pollutants greatly affects pathological implications.
Objectives
This randomized crossover study investigated responses of the respiratory system to Stockholm subway air in asthmatics and healthy individuals. Eicosanoids and other oxylipins were quantified in the distal lung to provide a measure of shifts in lipid mediators in association with exposure to subway air relative to ambient air.
Methods
Sixty-four oxylipins representing the cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways were screened using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)-fluid. Validations through immunocytochemistry staining of BAL-cells were performed for 15-LOX-1, COX-1, COX-2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Multivariate statistics were employed to interrogate acquired oxylipin and immunocytochemistry data in combination with patient clinical information.
Results
Asthmatics and healthy individuals exhibited divergent oxylipin profiles following exposure to ambient and subway air. Significant changes were observed in 8 metabolites of linoleic- and α-linolenic acid synthesized via the 15-LOX pathway, and of the COX product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Oxylipin levels were increased in healthy individuals following exposure to subway air, whereas asthmatics evidenced decreases or no change.
Conclusions
Several of the altered oxylipins have known or suspected bronchoprotective or anti-inflammatory effects, suggesting a possible reduced anti-inflammatory response in asthmatics following exposure to subway air. These observations may have ramifications for sensitive subpopulations in urban areas.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0023864
PMCID: PMC3163588  PMID: 21897859
3.  MMP12, Lung Function, and COPD in High-Risk Populations 
The New England journal of medicine  2009;361(27):2599-2608.
BACKGROUND
Genetic variants influencing lung function in children and adults may ultimately lead to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly in high-risk groups.
METHODS
We tested for an association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene encoding matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12) and a measure of lung function (prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]) in more than 8300 subjects in seven cohorts that included children and adults. Within the Normative Aging Study (NAS), a cohort of initially healthy adult men, we tested for an association between SNPs that were associated with FEV1 and the time to the onset of COPD. We then examined the relationship between MMP12 SNPs and COPD in two cohorts of adults with COPD or at risk for COPD.
RESULTS
The minor allele (G) of a functional variant in the promoter region of MMP12 (rs2276109 [−82A→G]) was positively associated with FEV1 in a combined analysis of children with asthma and adult former and current smokers in all cohorts (P=2×10−6). This allele was also associated with a reduced risk of the onset of COPD in the NAS cohort (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46 to 0.92; P = 0.02) and with a reduced risk of COPD in a cohort of smokers (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.88; P = 0.005) and among participants in a family-based study of early-onset COPD (P = 0.006).
CONCLUSIONS
The minor allele of a SNP in MMP12 (rs2276109) is associated with a positive effect on lung function in children with asthma and in adults who smoke. This allele is also associated with a reduced risk of COPD in adult smokers.
doi:10.1056/NEJMoa0904006
PMCID: PMC2904064  PMID: 20018959
4.  Genetic and environmental influence on lung function impairment in Swedish twins 
Respiratory Research  2010;11(1):92.
Background
The understanding of the influence of smoking and sex on lung function and symptoms is important for understanding diseases such as COPD. The influence of both genes and environment on lung function, smoking behaviour and the presence of respiratory symptoms has previously been demonstrated for each of these separately. Hence, smoking can influence lung function by co-varying not only as an environmental factor, but also by shared genetic pathways. Therefore, the objective was to evaluate heritability for different aspects of lung function, and to investigate how the estimates are affected by adjustments for smoking and respiratory symptoms.
Methods
The current study is based on a selected sample of adult twins from the Swedish Twin Registry. Pairs were selected based on background data on smoking and respiratory symptoms collected by telephone interview. Lung function was measured as FEV1, VC and DLco. Pack years were quantified, and quantitative genetic analysis was performed on lung function data adjusting stepwise for sex, pack years and respiratory symptoms.
Results
Fully adjusted heritability for VC was 59% and did not differ by sex, with smoking and symptoms explaining only a small part of the total variance. Heritabilities for FEV1 and DLco were sex specific. Fully adjusted estimates were10 and 15% in men and 46% and 39% in women, respectively. Adjustment for smoking and respiratory symptoms altered the estimates differently in men and women. For FEV1 and DLco, the variance explained by smoking and symptoms was larger in men. Further, smoking and symptoms explained genetic variance in women, but was primarily associated with shared environmental effects in men.
Conclusion
Differences between men and women were found in how smoking and symptoms influence the variation in lung function. Pulmonary gas transfer variation related to the menstrual cycle has been shown before, and the findings regarding DLco in the present study indicates gender specific environmental susceptibility not shown before. As a consequence the results suggest that patients with lung diseases such as COPD could benefit from interventions that are sex specific.
doi:10.1186/1465-9921-11-92
PMCID: PMC2914039  PMID: 20604964
5.  Interaction between Smoking and Genetic Factors in the Development of Chronic Bronchitis 
Rationale: Smoking is a primary risk factor for chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but since not all smokers develop disease, it has been suggested that some individuals may be more susceptible to exogenous factors, such as smoking, and that this susceptibility could be genetically determined.
Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess, in a population-based sample of twins, the following: (1) to what extent genetic factors contribute to the development of chronic bronchitis, including emphysema, taking sex into consideration, and (2) whether the genetic influences on chronic bronchitis, including emphysema, are separate from those for smoking behavior.
Methods: Disease cases and smoking habits were identified in 44,919 twins older than 40 years from the Swedish Twin Registry. Disease was defined as self-reported chronic bronchitis or emphysema, or recurrent cough with phlegm. Individuals who had smoked 10 pack-years or more were defined as smokers. Univariate and bivariate structural equation models were used to estimate the heritability specific for chronic bronchitis and that in common with smoking.
Measurements and Main Results: The heritability estimate for chronic bronchitis was a moderate 40% and only 14% of the genetic influences were shared with smoking.
Conclusions: Genetic factors independent of those related to smoking habits play a role in the development of chronic bronchitis.
doi:10.1164/rccm.200704-565OC
PMCID: PMC2258443  PMID: 18048810
chronic bronchitis; smoking; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; twin study; genes
6.  Interactions between Glutathione S-Transferase P1, Tumor Necrosis Factor, and Traffic-Related Air Pollution for Development of Childhood Allergic Disease 
Environmental Health Perspectives  2008;116(8):1077-1084.
Background
Air pollutants may induce airway inflammation and sensitization due to generation of reactive oxygen species. The genetic background to these mechanisms could be important effect modifiers.
Objective
Our goal was to assess interactions between exposure to air pollution and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2), glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) genes for development of childhood allergic disease.
Methods
In a birth cohort originally of 4,089 children, we assessed air pollution from local traffic using nitrogen oxides (traffic NOx) as an indicator based on emission databases and dispersion modeling and estimated individual exposure through geocoding of home addresses. We measured peak expiratory flow rates and specific IgE for inhalant and food allergens at 4 years of age, and selected children with asthma symptoms up to 4 years of age (n = 542) and controls (n = 542) for genotyping.
Results
Interaction effects on allergic sensitization were indicated between several GSTP1 SNPs and traffic NOx exposure during the first year of life (pnominal < 0.001–0.06). Children with Ile105Val/Val105Val genotypes were at increased risk of sensitization to any allergen when exposed to elevated levels of traffic NOx (for a difference between the 5th and 95th percentile of exposure: odds ratio = 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.0–5.3). In children with TNF-308 GA/AA genotypes, the GSTP1–NOx interaction effect was even more pronounced. We observed no conclusive interaction effects for ADRB2.
Conclusion
The effect of air pollution from traffic on childhood allergy appears to be modified by GSTP1 and TNF variants, supporting a role of genes controlling the antioxidative system and inflammatory response in allergy.
doi:10.1289/ehp.11117
PMCID: PMC2516580  PMID: 18709160
ADRB2; air pollution; allergy; asthma; genetics; GSTP1; interaction; nitrogen oxides; polymorphism; TNF
7.  Long-term clearance from small airways in subjects with ciliary dysfunction 
Respiratory Research  2006;7(1):79.
The objective of this study was to investigate if long-term clearance from small airways is dependent on normal ciliary function.
Six young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) inhaled 111 Indium labelled Teflon particles of 4.2 μm geometric and 6.2 μm aerodynamic diameter with an extremely slow inhalation flow, 0.05 L/s. The inhalation method deposits particles mainly in the small conducting airways. Lung retention was measured immediately after inhalation and at four occasions up to 21 days after inhalation. Results were compared with data from ten healthy controls. For additional comparison three of the PCD subjects also inhaled the test particles with normal inhalation flow, 0.5 L/s, providing a more central deposition. The lung retention at 24 h in % of lung deposition (Ret24) was higher (p < 0.001) in the PCD subjects, 79 % (95% Confidence Interval, 67.6;90.6), compared to 49 % (42.3;55.5) in the healthy controls. There was a significant clearance after 24 h both in the PCD subjects and in the healthy controls with equivalent clearance. The mean Ret24 with slow inhalation flow was 73.9 ± 1.9 % compared to 68.9 ± 7.5 % with normal inhalation flow in the three PCD subjects exposed twice. During day 7–21 the three PCD subjects exposed twice cleared 9 % with normal flow, probably representing predominantly alveolar clearance, compared to 19 % with slow inhalation flow, probably representing mainly small airway clearance.
This study shows that despite ciliary dysfunction, clearance continues in the small airways beyond 24 h. There are apparently additional clearance mechanisms present in the small airways.
doi:10.1186/1465-9921-7-79
PMCID: PMC1489941  PMID: 16712736

Results 1-7 (7)