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1.  Interleukin-6 concentrations in the urine and dipstick analyses were related to bacteriuria but not symptoms in the elderly: a cross sectional study of 421 nursing home residents 
BMC Geriatrics  2014;14:88.
Up to half the residents of nursing homes for the elderly have asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which should not be treated with antibiotics. A complementary test to discriminate between symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI) and ABU is needed, as diagnostic uncertainty is likely to generate significant antibiotic overtreatment. Previous studies indicate that Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the urine might be suitable as such a test. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between laboratory findings of bacteriuria, IL-6 in the urine, dipstick urinalysis and newly onset symptoms among residents of nursing homes.
In this cross sectional study, voided urine specimens for culture, urine dipstick and IL-6 analyses were collected from all residents capable of providing a voided urine sample, regardless of the presence of symptoms. Urine specimens and symptom forms were provided from 421 residents of 22 nursing homes. The following new or increased nonspecific symptoms occurring during the previous month were registered; fatigue, restlessness, confusion, aggressiveness, loss of appetite, frequent falls and not being herself/himself, as well as symptoms from the urinary tract; dysuria, urinary urgency and frequency.
Recent onset of nonspecific symptoms was common among elderly residents of nursing homes (85/421). Urine cultures were positive in 32% (135/421), Escherichia coli was by far the most common bacterial finding. Residents without nonspecific symptoms had positive urine cultures as often as those with nonspecific symptoms with a duration of up to one month. Residents with positive urine cultures had higher concentrations of IL-6 in the urine (p < 0.001). However, among residents with positive urine cultures there were no differences in IL-6 concentrations or dipstick findings between those with or without nonspecific symptoms.
Nonspecific symptoms among elderly residents of nursing homes are unlikely to be caused by bacteria in the urine. This study could not establish any clinical value of using dipstick urinalysis or IL-6 in the urine to verify if bacteriuria was linked to nonspecific symptoms.
PMCID: PMC4137105  PMID: 25117748
Interleukin-6; Urinary tract infections; Bacteriuria; Homes for the aged; Nursing homes; Dipstick urinalysis; Diagnostic tests
2.  Antimicrobial resistance in urinary pathogens among Swedish nursing home residents remains low: a cross-sectional study comparing antimicrobial resistance from 2003 to 2012 
BMC Geriatrics  2014;14:30.
There are several risk factors for the colonisation, infection and spreading of antibiotic resistant bacteria among elderly residents of nursing homes. An updated estimate of the native prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in uropathogens among Swedish nursing home residents is needed.
Urine specimens were collected for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing against mecillinam, ampicillin, cefadroxil, trimethoprim, nitrofurantoin and quinolones from the residents of 32 and 22 nursing homes, respectively. The residents were capable of providing a voided urine sample in 2003 and 2012. In 2012 urine specimens were also collected from residents with urinary catheters. Any antibiotic treatment during the previous month was registered in 2003 as well as hospitalisation and any antibiotic treatment during the previous six months in 2012.
The proportion of positive urine cultures was 32% (207/651) in voided urine specimens in 2003, 35% (147/421) in 2012, and 46% (27/59) in urine samples from catheters in 2012. Escherichia coli (E. coli) was the most commonly occurring bacteria.
Resistance rates in E. coli (voided urine specimens) in 2012 were; ampicillin 21%, trimethoprim 12%, mecillinam 7.7%, ciprofloxacin 3.4%, cefadroxil 2.6% and nitrofurantoin 0.85%. There were no significant changes in the average resistance rates in E. coli for antibiotics tested 2003–2012.
In 2012, two isolates of E. coli produced extended spectrum beta-lactamase enzymes (ESBL) and one with plasmid mediated AmpC production.
Any antibiotic treatment during the previous month increased the risk for resistance in E. coli, adjusted for age and gender; for mecillinam with an odds ratio (OR) of 7.1 (2.4-21; p = 0.00049), ampicillin OR 5.2 (2.4-11; p = 0.000036), nalidixic acid OR 4.6 (1.4-16; p = 0.014) and trimethoprim OR 3.9 (1.6-9.2; p = 0.0023). Hospitalisation during the previous six months increased the risk for antibiotic resistance in E. coli to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and any antimicrobial tested, adjusted for age, gender and antibiotic treatments during the previous six months.
The average rates of antimicrobial resistance were low and did not increase between 2003 and 2012 in E. coli urinary isolates among Swedish nursing home residents. Antibiotic treatment during the previous month and hospitalisation during the previous six months predicted higher resistance rates.
PMCID: PMC3975149  PMID: 24625344
Drug resistance; Bacterial; Bacteriuria; Nursing homes; Homes for the aged; Urinary tract infections; Antibiotics
3.  Urine culture doubtful in determining etiology of diffuse symptoms among elderly individuals: a cross-sectional study of 32 nursing homes 
BMC Family Practice  2011;12:36.
The high prevalence of bacteriuria in elderly individuals makes it difficult to know if a new symptom is related to bacteria in the urine. There are different views concerning this relationship and bacteriuria often leads to antibiotic treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between bacteria in the urine and new or increased restlessness, fatigue, confusion, aggressiveness, not being herself/himself, dysuria, urgency and fever in individuals at nursing homes for elderly when statistically considering the high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in this population.
In this cross-sectional study symptoms were registered and voided urine specimens were collected for urinary cultures from 651 elderly individuals. Logistic regressions were performed to evaluate the statistical correlation between bacteriuria and presence of a symptom at group level. To estimate the clinical relevance of statistical correlations at group level positive and negative etiological predictive values (EPV) were calculated.
Logistic regression indicated some correlations at group level. Aside from Escherichia coli in the urine and not being herself/himself existing at least one month, but less than three months, EPV indicated no clinically useful correlation between any symptoms in this study and findings of bacteriuria.
Urinary cultures provide little or no useful information when evaluating diffuse symptoms among elderly residents of nursing homes. Either common urinary tract pathogens are irrelevant, or urine culture is an inappropriate test.
PMCID: PMC3142216  PMID: 21592413
Urinary Tract Infections; Homes for the Aged; Nursing Homes; Bacteriuria; Predictive Value of Tests
4.  Evaluation of dipstick analysis among elderly residents to detect bacteriuria: a cross-sectional study in 32 nursing homes 
BMC Geriatrics  2009;9:32.
Few studies have evaluated dipstick urinalysis for elderly and practically none present confidence intervals. Furthermore, most previous studies combine all bacteria species in a "positive culture". Thus, their evaluation may be inappropriate due to Yule-Simpson's paradox. The aim of this study was to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of dipstick urinalysis for the elderly in nursing homes.
In this cross-sectional study voided urine specimens were collected from 651 elderly individuals in nursing homes. Dipstick urinalysis for nitrite, leukocyte esterase and urine culture were performed. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Visual readings were compared to readings with a urine chemistry analyzer.
207/651 (32%) of urine cultures showed growth of a potentially pathogenic bacterium. Combining the two dipsticks improved test characteristics slightly compared to using only one of the dipsticks. When both dipsticks are negative, presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria can be ruled out with a negative predictive value of 88 (84–92)%. Visual and analyzer readings had acceptable agreement.
When investigating for bacteriuria in elderly people at nursing homes we suggest nitrite and leukocyte esterase dipstick be combined. There are no clinically relevant differences between visual and analyzer dipstick readings. When dipstick urinalysis for nitrite and leukocyte esterase are both negative it is unlikely that the urine culture will show growth of potentially pathogenic bacteria and in a patient with an uncomplicated illness further testing is unnecessary.
PMCID: PMC2724370  PMID: 19635163

Results 1-4 (4)