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author:("Sun, yihu")
1.  Spectrum of LKB1, EGFR, and KRAS Mutations in Chinese Lung Adenocarcinomas 
Introduction
Somatic LKB1 mutations are found in lung adenocarcinomas at different frequencies in Caucasian and East Asian (Japanese and Korean) populations. This study was designed to characterize the frequency of LKB1 mutations, their relationship to EGFR and KRAS mutations, and their associated clinicopathologic characteristics in Chinese patients.
Methods
Two hundred thirty-nine lung adenocarcinomas consecutively collected from October 2007 to July 2009 were dissected into 3 to 4 small (3 mm) pieces for histopathological analyses of tumor content. Genomic DNA and/or cDNA from 86 samples with more than 70% tumor content were used for sequencing of LKB1 (exons 1–9), EGFR (exons 18–21), and KRAS (exon 2). LKB1 germline mutation status was determined by sequencing of genomic DNA from matched histologically distant lung tissues that are histologically normal.
Results
6.9% of lung adenocarcinomas harbored LKB1 somatic mutations. A total of 10.5% of patients had an LKB1 germline polymorphism, F354L. Interestingly, in two of these patients, tumors displayed loss of heterozygosity at this allele. EGFR kinase domain and KRAS mutations were found in 66.3% and 2.3% of Chinese lung adenocarcinomas, respectively. Concurrent LKB1 and EGFR somatic mutations were observed in one patient. Both KRAS-mutant tumors harbored LKB1 mutations.
Conclusions
These data provide important clinical and molecular characteristics of lung adenocarcinomas from Chinese patients.
doi:10.1097/JTO.0b013e3181e05016
PMCID: PMC4009449  PMID: 20559149
Chinese lung adenocarcinoma; LKB1; EGFR; KRAS; Mutation
2.  Protein expression of programmed death 1 ligand 1 and ligand 2 independently predict poor prognosis in surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma 
OncoTargets and therapy  2014;7:567-573.
Background
The clinicopathologic characteristics of tumors expressing programmed death (PD-1) ligands (PD-Ls) PD-L1 or PD-L2 and their associations with common driver mutations in lung adenocarcinoma are not clearly defined, despite the progression of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immunotherapy.
Methods
PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression was measured by immunohistochemistry in 143 surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas and was correlated with clinical variables, histologic subtypes, and the mutational status of EGFR, KRAS, HER2, and ALK.
Results
Positive PD-L1 expression was significantly associated with more advanced T status, N status, and pathologic stage. Histologically, lung adenocarcinomas with positive PD-L1 staining were less likely to be adenocarcinoma in situ or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma and more likely to have solid predominant subtype. Both PD-L1 expression (odds ratio =1.984, 95% confidence interval =1.010–3.894; P=0.047) and PD-L2 expression (odds ratio =2.328, 95% confidence interval =1.201–4.512; P=0.012) were independent predictors of poor overall survival. When the combined PD-L expression and pathologic stage were used together to predict overall survival, the concordance index increased to 0.763, and the Akaike information criteria value decreased to 356.08.
Conclusion
We defined the clinicopathologic features of lung adenocarcinomas with high expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2. We further demonstrated the role of PD-L expression as a useful prognostic marker for lung adenocarcinoma.
doi:10.2147/OTT.S59959
PMCID: PMC3990506  PMID: 24748806
immunotherapy; lung cancer; prognostic markers; oncogenic driver mutations
3.  Two co-existing germline mutations P53 V157D and PMS2 R20Q promote tumorigenesis in a familial cancer syndrome 
Cancer letters  2013;342(1):36-42.
Germline mutations are responsible for familial cancer syndromes which account for approximately 5–10% of all types of cancers. These mutations mainly occur at tumor suppressor genes or genome stability genes, such as DNA repair genes. Here we have identified a cancer predisposition family, in which eight members were inflicted with a wide spectrum of cancer including one diagnosed with lung cancer at 22 years old. Sequencing analysis of tumor samples as well as histologically normal specimens identified two germline mutations co-existing in the familial cancer syndrome, the mutation of tumor suppressor gene P53 V157D and mismatch repair gene PMS2 R20Q. We further demonstrate that P53 V157D and/or PMS2 R20Q mutant promotes lung cancer cell proliferation. These two mutants are capable of promoting colony formation in soft agar as well as tumor formation in transgenic drosophila system. Collectively, these data have uncovered the important role of co-existing germline P53 and PMS2 mutations in the familial cancer syndrome development.
doi:10.1016/j.canlet.2013.08.032
PMCID: PMC3981830  PMID: 23981578
P53 V157D; PMS2 R20Q; Germline mutation; Familial cancer syndrome; Co-existing
4.  Primary concomitant EGFR T790M mutation predicted worse prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer patients 
OncoTargets and therapy  2014;7:513-524.
Purpose
We performed this analysis to improve the understanding of the clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcome of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring the primary epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) T790M mutation along with activating EGFR mutation.
Methods
Resected tumors from 1903 NSCLC patients were analyzed for mutation in EGFR, as well as KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog), BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B), HER2 (human epidermal growth factor 2), PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha), and EML4 (echinoderm microtubule associated protein like 4)–ALK (anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase) fusion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to define EGFR and c-MET (met proto-oncogene gene amplification. Expression of PIK3CA and p-Akt (phosphorylated protein kinase B) were tested using immunohistochemistry. Clinical and pathological data, including sex, age at diagnosis, stage, tumor differentiation, smoking history, histological subtype, relapse-free and overall survival, were further analyzed.
Results
In all, 16 NSCLC patients were found to harbor primary EGFR T790M mutation, including 14 adenocarcinomas and two adenosquamous carcinomas, accounting for 2.04% of all the EGFR mutant cases and 0.84% of the total. No c-MET amplification was found to coexist with primary EGFR T790M. Fewer EGFR copy-number variations were found in samples harboring EGFR T790M mutations compared with those in patients with exon 19 deletions and L858R. Overall survival was significantly shorter for patients harboring EGFR T790M mutation than it was for patients with exon 19 deletions (logrank P=0.008). When taking patients harboring EGFR L858R or exon 19 deletions as one group, the overall survival was also significantly longer than that in patients with T790M mutation (logrank P=0.012). There was no significant difference in relapse-free survival among three subgroups of patients.
Conclusion
Our study described the clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of NSCLC patients harboring primary EGFR T790M mutations. Its value of being a predictor for worse prognosis was established. Primary EGFR T790M mutation is a rare event in NSCLC cases, but the therapeutic strategies for this subtype of patients should be precisely considered.
doi:10.2147/OTT.S60122
PMCID: PMC3979794  PMID: 24729716
driver mutation; survival; clinicopathological profile; EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor; acquired resistance
5.  The pemetrexed-containing treatments in the non-small cell lung cancer, is -/low thymidylate synthase expression better than +/high thymidylate synthase expression: a meta-analysis 
BMC Cancer  2014;14:205.
Background
The predictive value of thymidylate synthase (TS) for clinical sensitivity to pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. This meta-analysis is performed to provide an assessment of whether expression variations of TS are associated with objective response in patients with NSCLC treated with pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy.
Methods
An electronic search was conducted using the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CNKI, from inception to June 10th, 2013. A systemic review of the studies on the association between TS expression in NSCLC and objective response of pemetrexed-containing regimen was performed. Pooled odds ratios (OR) for the response rate were calculated using the software Revman 5.0.
Results
There were a total of 526 patients in the eight studies that met our criteria for evaluation. +/high expression of TS was found in 269 patients (51.1%), and -/low expression for this gene was found in 257 (48.9%) patients. The objective response rate for pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy was significantly higher in patients with -/low expression TS expression (OR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.29–0.70; p = 0.0004). Although patients with -/low expression of TS have a longer median overall survival time and progression free survival time than those with +/high expression of TS, the difference was not statistically significant.
Conclusions
−/low expression of TS was associated with higher objective response in NSCLC patients treated with pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy. TS may be a suitable marker of sensitivity to pemetrexed-based chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC.
doi:10.1186/1471-2407-14-205
PMCID: PMC3994655  PMID: 24641970
Thymidylate synthase; Pemetrexed; Lung cancer; Meta-analysis
6.  PIK3CA Mutations Frequently Coexist with EGFR/KRAS Mutations in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Suggest Poor Prognosis in EGFR/KRAS Wildtype Subgroup 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(2):e88291.
Purpose
PIK3CA gene encoding a catalytic subunit of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) is mutated and/or amplified in various neoplasia, including lung cancer. Here we investigated PIK3CA gene alterations, the expression of core components of PI3K pathway, and evaluated their clinical importance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Materials and methods
Oncogenic mutations/rearrangements in PIK3CA, EGFR, KRAS, HER2, BRAF, AKT1 and ALK genes were detected in tumors from 1117 patients with NSCLC. PIK3CA gene copy number was examined by fluorescent in situ hybridization and the expression of PI3K p110 subunit alpha (PI3K p110α), p-Akt, mTOR, PTEN was determined by immunohistochemistry in PIK3CA mutant cases and 108 patients without PIK3CA mutation.
Results
PIK3CA mutation was found in 3.9% of squamous cell carcinoma and 2.7% of adenocarcinoma. Among 34 PIK3CA mutant cases, 17 tumors harbored concurrent EGFR mutations and 4 had KRAS mutations. PIK3CA mutation was significantly associated with high expression of PI3K p110α (p<0.0001), p-Akt (p = 0.024) and mTOR (p = 0.001), but not correlated with PIK3CA amplification (p = 0.463). Patients with single PIK3CA mutation had shorter overall survival than those with PIK3CA-EGFR/KRAS co-mutation or wildtype PIK3CA (p = 0.004). A significantly worse survival was also found in patients with PIK3CA mutations than those without PIK3CA mutations in the EGFR/KRAS wildtype subgroup (p = 0.043)
Conclusions
PIK3CA mutations frequently coexist with EGFR/KRAS mutations. The poor prognosis of patients with single PIK3CA mutation in NSCLC and the prognostic value of PIK3CA mutation in EGFR/KRAS wildtype subgroup suggest the distinct mutation status of PIK3CA gene should be determined for individual therapeutic strategies in NSCLC.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0088291
PMCID: PMC3922761  PMID: 24533074
7.  Sequential treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and chemotherapy for EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of Phase III trials 
OncoTargets and therapy  2013;6:1771-1777.
Background
This aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy followed, upon progression, by chemotherapy with the reverse sequence in patients with EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in terms of overall survival.
Methods
We performed a meta-analysis of studies that met the following criteria: Phase III clinical trial comparing the sequencing of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors with chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced EGFR-mutated NSCLC; activating mutations reported; and availability of hazard ratio estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for overall survival.
Results
Six clinical trials were included in this study. The pooled hazard ratio for overall survival of the EGFR-mutated population that completed sequential treatment was 1.03 (95% CI 0.86–1.22, P=0.776). There was no statistically significant heterogeneity between the studies (tau2 =0; I2=0, 95% CI 0–0.37, P=0.548). Evidence of marked publication bias for the two treatment sequences was insufficient (P=0.145).
Conclusion
In patients with advanced NSCLC and activating EGFR mutations, first-line chemotherapy followed upon progression by a tyrosine kinase inhibitor was not inferior in terms of overall survival compared with the inverse sequence. This may serve as an indication that chemotherapy could be employed initially if mutation testing results are unavailable.
doi:10.2147/OTT.S54502
PMCID: PMC3848930  PMID: 24348052
EGFR mutation; tyrosine kinase inhibitor; chemotherapy; non-small cell lung cancer; clinical trial
8.  The CRTC1-NEDD9 Signaling Axis Mediates Lung Cancer Progression Caused by LKB1 Loss 
Cancer research  2012;72(24):6502-6511.
Somatic mutation of the tumor suppressor gene LKB1 occurs frequently in lung cancer where it causes tumor progression and metastasis, but the underlying mechanisms remain mainly unknown. Here, we show that the oncogene NEDD9 is an important downstream mediator of lung cancer progression evoked by LKB1 loss. In de novo mouse models, RNAi-mediated silencing of Nedd9 inhibited lung tumor progression, whereas ectopic NEDD9 expression accelerated this process. Mechanistically, LKB1 negatively regulated NEDD9 transcription by promoting cytosolic translocation of CRTC1 from the nucleus. Notably, ectopic expression of either NEDD9 or CRTC1 partially reversed the inhibitory function of LKB1 on metastasis of lung cancer cells. In clinical specimens, elevated expression of NEDD9 was associated with malignant progression and metastasis. Collectively, our results decipher the mechanism through which LKB1 deficiency promotes lung cancer progression and metastasis, and provide a mechanistic rationale for therapeutic attack of these processes.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-1909
PMCID: PMC3755891  PMID: 23074285
9.  ALK-Rearranged Lung Cancer in Chinese: A Comprehensive Assessment of Clinicopathology, IHC, FISH and RT-PCR 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(7):e69016.
Approximately 3–7% of non-small cell lung cancers harbor an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusion, constituting a new molecular subtype of lung cancer that responds to crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor. Although previous studies have evaluated ALK-rearranged lung cancers, the comprehensive analysis of lung cancer in Chinese has not well assessed. Herein, we identified 44 cases of ALK-rearranged samples by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in a large number of surgically resected lung cancers. All 44 ALK-rearranged lung cancers were adenocarcinomas, with 2 cases having additional focal squamous components. The goal was to analyse the clinicopathological features of ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinomas. Our data showed that a cribriform structure, prominent extracellular mucus and any type of mucous cell pattern may be either sensitive or specific to predict an ALK rearrangement. We used FISH as the standard detection method. We compared the ALK rearrangement accuracy of FISH, RT-PCR and IHC. RT-PCR could define both the ALK fusion partner and the fusion variant, but seemed unable to detect all translocations involving the ALK gene. It is noteworthy that IHC using the D5F3 antibody (Cell Signaling Technology) showed higher sensitivity and specificity than the ALK1 antibody (Dako). Therefore, we conclude that IHC remains a cost-effective and efficient technique for diagnosing ALK rearrangements and that D5F3 can be the optimal screening antibody in clinical practice.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0069016
PMCID: PMC3724879  PMID: 23922677
10.  Frequency of driver mutations in lung adenocarcinoma from female never-smokers varies with histological subtypes and age at diagnosis 
Clinical Cancer Research  2012;18(7):1947-1953.
Purpose
Our previous study revealed that 90% (47 of 52; 95% CI: 0.79–0.96) of Chinese never-smokers with lung adenocarcinoma harbor known oncogenic driver mutations in just four genes: EGFR, ALK, HER2, and KRAS. Here, we examined the status of known driver mutations specifically in female never-smokers with lung adenocarcinoma.
Experimental Design
Tumors were genotyped for mutations in EGFR, KRAS, ALK, HER2, and BRAF. Data on age, stage, tumor differentiation, histological subtypes, and molecular alterations were recorded from 349 resected lung adenocarcinomas from female never-smokers. We further compared the clinicopathological parameters according to mutational status of these genes.
Results
Two hundred and sixty-six (76.2%) tumors harbored EGFR mutations, 16 (4.6%) HER2 mutations, 15 (4.3%) EML4-ALK fusions, seven (2.0%) KRAS mutations, and two (0.6%) BRAF mutations. In univariate analysis, patients harboring EGFR mutations were significantly older (p<0.001), whereas patients harboring HER2 mutations were significantly younger (p=0.036). Higher prevalence of KRAS (p=0.028) and HER2 (p=0.021) mutations was found in invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma (IMA). The frequency of EGFR mutations was positively correlated with acinar predominant tumors (p=0.002). Multivariate analysis revealed that older age at diagnosis (p=0.013) and acinar predominant subtype (p=0.005) were independent predictors of EGFR mutations. Independent predictors of HER2 mutations included younger age (p=0.030) and IMA (p=0.017). IMA (p=0.006) and poor differentiation (p=0.028) were independently associated with KRAS mutations.
Conclusions
The frequency of driver mutations in never-smoking female lung adenocarcinoma varies with histological subtypes and age at diagnosis. These data have implications for both clinical trial design and therapeutic strategies.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-11-2511
PMCID: PMC3319848  PMID: 22317764
Lung adenocarcinoma; Female; Never smoker; EGFR mutation; HER2 mutation; Acinar; Mucinous; Age
11.  Integrative Proteomics and Tissue Microarray Profiling Indicate the Association between Overexpressed Serum Proteins and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(12):e51748.
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Clinically, the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by the early detection and risk screening among population. To meet this need, here we describe the application of extensive peptide level fractionation coupled with label free quantitative proteomics for the discovery of potential serum biomarkers for lung cancer, and the usage of Tissue microarray analysis (TMA) and Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assays for the following up validations in the verification phase. Using these state-of-art, currently available clinical proteomic approaches, in the discovery phase we confidently identified 647 serum proteins, and 101 proteins showed a statistically significant association with NSCLC in our 18 discovery samples. This serum proteomic dataset allowed us to discern the differential patterns and abnormal biological processes in the lung cancer blood. Of these proteins, Alpha-1B-glycoprotein (A1BG) and Leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1), two plasma glycoproteins with previously unknown function were selected as examples for which TMA and MRM verification were performed in a large sample set consisting about 100 patients. We revealed that A1BG and LRG1 were overexpressed in both the blood level and tumor sections, which can be referred to separate lung cancer patients from healthy cases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051748
PMCID: PMC3526638  PMID: 23284758
12.  Spectrum of Oncogenic Driver Mutations in Lung Adenocarcinomas from East Asian Never Smokers 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(11):e28204.
Purpose
We previously showed that 90% (47 of 52; 95% CI, 0.79 to 0.96) of lung adenocarcinomas from East Asian never-smokers harbored well-known oncogenic mutations in just four genes: EGFR, HER2, ALK, and KRAS. Here, we sought to extend these findings to more samples and identify driver alterations in tumors negative for these mutations.
Experimental Design
We have collected and analyzed 202 resected lung adenocarcinomas from never smokers seen at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Since mutations were mutually exclusive in the first 52 examined, we determined the status of EGFR, KRAS, HER2, ALK, and BRAF in stepwise fashion as previously described. Samples negative for mutations in these 5 genes were subsequently examined for known ROS1 fusions by RT-PCR and direct sequencing.
Results
152 tumors (75.3%) harbored EGFR mutations, 12 (6%) had HER2 mutations, 10 (5%) had ALK fusions all involving EML4 as the 5′ partner, 4 (2%) had KRAS mutations, and 2 (1%) harbored ROS1 fusions. No BRAF mutation were detected.
Conclusion
The vast majority (176 of 202; 87.1%, 95% CI: 0.82 to 0.91) of lung adenocarcinomas from never smokers harbor mutant kinases sensitive to available TKIs. Interestingly, patients with EGFR mutant patients tend to be older than those without EGFR mutations (58.3 Vs 54.3, P = 0.016) and patient without any known oncogenic driver tend to be diagnosed at a younger age (52.3 Vs 57.9, P = 0.013). Collectively, these data indicate that the majority of never smokers with lung adenocarcinoma could benefit from treatment with a specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0028204
PMCID: PMC3227646  PMID: 22140546
13.  Lung Adenocarcinoma From East Asian Never-Smokers Is a Disease Largely Defined by Targetable Oncogenic Mutant Kinases 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2010;28(30):4616-4620.
Purpose
To determine the proportion of lung adenocarcinomas from East Asian never-smokers who harbor known oncogenic driver mutations.
Patients and Methods
In this surgical series, 52 resected lung adenocarcinomas from never-smokers (< 100 cigarettes in a lifetime) at a single institution (Fudan University, Shanghai, China) were analyzed concurrently for mutations in EGFR, KRAS, NRAS, HRAS, HER2, BRAF, ALK, PIK3CA, TP53 and LKB1.
Results
Forty-one tumors harbored EGFR mutations, three harbored EML4-ALK fusions, two harbored HER2 insertions, and one harbored a KRAS mutation. All mutations were mutually exclusive. Thus, 90% (47 of 52; 95% CI, 0.7896 to 0.9625) of lung adenocarcinomas from never-smokers were found to harbor well-known oncogenic mutations in just four genes. No BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, or LKB1 mutations were detected, while 15 had TP53 mutations. Four tumors contained PIK3CA mutations, always together with EGFR mutations.
Conclusion
To our knowledge, this study represents the first comprehensive and concurrent analysis of major recurrent oncogenic mutations found in a large cohort of lung adenocarcinomas from East Asian never-smokers. Since drugs are now available that target mutant EGFR, HER2, and ALK, respectively, this result indicates that prospective mutation testing in these patients should successfully assign a targeted therapy in the majority of cases.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2010.29.6038
PMCID: PMC2974342  PMID: 20855837
14.  HLungDB: an integrated database of human lung cancer research 
Nucleic Acids Research  2009;38(Database issue):D665-D669.
The human lung cancer database (HLungDB) is a database with the integration of the lung cancer-related genes, proteins and miRNAs together with the corresponding clinical information. The main purpose of this platform is to establish a network of lung cancer-related molecules and to facilitate the mechanistic study of lung carcinogenesis. The entries describing the relationships between molecules and human lung cancer in the current release were extracted manually from literatures. Currently, we have collected 2585 genes and 212 miRNA with the experimental evidences involved in the different stages of lung carcinogenesis through text mining. Furthermore, we have incorporated the results from analysis of transcription factor-binding motifs, the promoters and the SNP sites for each gene. Since epigenetic alterations also play an important role in lung carcinogenesis, genes with epigenetic regulation were also included. We hope HLungDB will enrich our knowledge about lung cancer biology and eventually lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies. HLungDB can be freely accessed at http://www.megabionet.org/bio/hlung.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkp945
PMCID: PMC2808962  PMID: 19900972
15.  Transdifferentiation of lung adenocarcinoma in mice with Lkb1 deficiency to squamous cell carcinoma 
Nature Communications  2014;5:3261.
Lineage transition in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of non-small cell lung cancer, as implicated by clinical observation of mixed ADC and SCC pathologies in adenosquamous cell carcinoma, remains a fundamental yet unsolved question. Here we provide in vivo evidence showing the transdifferentiation of lung cancer from ADC to SCC in mice: Lkb1-deficient lung ADC progressively transdifferentiates into SCC, via a pathologically mixed mAd-SCC intermediate. We find that reduction of lysyl oxidase (Lox) in Lkb1-deficient lung ADC decreases collagen disposition and triggers extracellular matrix remodelling and upregulates p63 expression, a SCC lineage survival oncogene. Pharmacological Lox inhibition promotes the transdifferentiation, whereas ectopic Lox expression significantly inhibits this process. Notably, ADC and SCC show differential responses to Lox inhibition. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the de novo transdifferentiation of lung ADC to SCC in mice and provide mechanistic insight that may have important implications for lung cancer treatment.
Non-small cell lung cancer manifests as adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma but tumours of mixed lineage are often found in humans. Here, the authors show that adenocarcinoma can transdifferentiate into squamous cell carcinomas in mice.
doi:10.1038/ncomms4261
PMCID: PMC3929783  PMID: 24531128

Results 1-15 (15)