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1.  MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF CORRINOIDS III.  
Journal of Bacteriology  1964;88(4):1139-1144.
Burgus, R. C. (Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich.), J. B. Hufham, W. M. Scott, and J. J. Pfiffner. Microbial degradation of corrinoids. III. Pigments derived from vitamin B12 by Pseudomonas rubescens. J. Bacteriol. 88:1139–1144. 1964.—Products derived from vitamin B12 by Pseudomonas rubescens under anaerobic conditions were examined. After incubation of the organism in broth containing Co57- or P32- vitamin B12, electrophoresis of the extracted corrinoids yielded two major, yellow, radioactive fractions, designated A and B, with spectral and electrophoretic properties similar to pigments I and II, derived from vitamin B12 by Aerobacter aerogenes. Fractions A and B were essentially inactive in promoting the growth of Lactobacillus leichmannii. Chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose separated both fractions A and B into four yellow, radioactive fractions. The absorption spectrum of each of the major subfractions showed a maximum in the ultraviolet region characteristic of a 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole nucleotide, but lacked a maximum in the 360-mμ region characteristic of vitamin B12 and many of its analogues and derivatives. The pigments were stable to cyanide and, although they were more stable to air and light than were the vitamin B12 coenzymes and coenzyme analogues, they were apparently slowly decomposed by light. The data suggest that the bacteria alter the corrin nucleus of vitamin B12.
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PMCID: PMC314864  PMID: 14219029
2.  MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF CORRINOIDS I. Vitamin B12 
Journal of Bacteriology  1964;88(3):581-585.
Scott, W. M. (Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich.), R. C. Burgus, J. B. Hufham, and J. J. Pfiffner. Microbial degradation of corrinoids. I. Vitamin B12. J. Bacteriol. 88:581–585. 1964.—Microorganisms isolated from a variety of soil, sewage, and mud samples, and stock cultures, were examined for the ability to degrade vitamin B12. More than 200 isolates which attack the vitamin were examined, and they all demonstrated reversible fading of the red vitamin. The color was restored by aeration. Very few microorganisms were able to degrade the vitamin to permanently colorless products, although many were able to degrade it partially, to produce new pigments. Some of these pigments appeared similar, if not identical, although they were produced by different bacteria. Radiotracer and electrophoretic mobility data are presented to show that the transformation products are derived from the vitamin. All the degradative microorganisms isolated were bacteria, and the most active was Pseudomonas rubescens.
PMCID: PMC277350  PMID: 14208491
3.  A New Serological Type of Salmonella 
The Journal of Hygiene  1930;29(4):415-417.
PMCID: PMC2167848  PMID: 20475042
8.  The “Thompson” Type of Salmonella 
The Journal of Hygiene  1926;25(4):398-405.
PMCID: PMC2167529  PMID: 20474899
12.  DIET AND PUERPERAL SEPSIS 
British Medical Journal  1931;2(3701):1113.
PMCID: PMC2315224
13.  FOOD POISONING DUE TO EGGS 
British Medical Journal  1930;2(3627):56-58.
PMCID: PMC2452419  PMID: 20775573
14.  Osteochondritis dessicans and subchondral cystic lesions in draft horses: a retrospective study. 
The Canadian Veterinary Journal  1998;39(10):627-633.
The clinical features, radiographic findings, treatment, and outcome in 51 draft horses with osteochondritis dessicans (OCD) or subchondral cystic lesions (SC) are reported. Clydesdale and Percheron were the most commonly affected breeds, and affected animals represented only 5% of the hospital population of draft horses. Horses were most frequently affected in the tibiotarsal joints and 73% (24 of 33 cases) of the horses with tibiotarsal effusion were affected bilaterally. Osteochondritis dessicans of the distal intermediate ridge was the most common lesion found in the tibiotarsal joint. The stifle was also frequently affected; 87% (13 of 15 cases) of horses with femoropatellar OCD only were lame, and lesions were most commonly located on the lateral trochlear ridge. Sixteen cases were managed conservatively, 30 received surgery, and 5 were euthanized. Lameness, effusion, or both clinical signs resolved in more than 50% of surgically treated cases, but clinical signs improved in 30% of conservatively-managed cases.
PMCID: PMC1539460  PMID: 9789673

Results 1-14 (14)