PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  New Strategies in Ovarian Cancer: Uptake and experience of women at high risk of ovarian cancer who are considering risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy 
This paper reviews factors associated with uptake of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy by women at increased hereditary risk for ovarian cancer, as well as quality of life issues following surgery. Forty one research studies identified through PubMed and PsychInfo met inclusion criteria. Older age, having had children, a family history of ovarian cancer, a personal history of breast cancer, prophylactic mastectomy, and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier status increase the likelihood of undergoing surgery. Psychosocial variables predictive of surgery uptake include greater perceived risk of ovarian cancer and cancer-related anxiety. Most women report satisfaction with their decision to undergo surgery and both lower perceived ovarian cancer risk and less cancer-related anxiety as benefits. Hormonal deprivation is the main disadvantage reported, particularly by premenopausal women who are not on hormonal replacement therapy (HRT). The evidence is mixed regarding satisfaction with the level of information provided prior to surgery, although generally women report receiving insufficient information regarding the pros and cons of HRT. These findings indicate that when designing decision aids, demographic, medical history, and psychosocial variables need to be addressed in order to facilitate quality decision making.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-09-2953
PMCID: PMC3107031  PMID: 20829330
ovarian risk; prophylactic oophorectomy; patient decision making; quality of life
2.  The Identification of Cognitive Profiles among Women Considering BRCA1/2 Testing through the Utilization of Cluster Analytic Techniques 
Psychology & health  2011;26(10):1327-1343.
Based on the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing model, we identified cognitive profiles of women at risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Prior to genetic counseling, participants (N = 171) completed a study questionnaire concerning their cognitive and affective responses to to being at genetic risk. Using cluster analysis, four cognitive profiles were generated: (a) high perceived risk/low coping; (b) low value of screening/high expectancy of cancer; (c) moderate perceived risk/moderate efficacy of prevention/low informativeness of test result; and (d) high efficacy of prevention/high coping. The majority of women in clusters one, two and three were unaffected, whereas cluster four consisted almost entirely of affected women. Women in cluster one had the highest number of affected relatives and experienced higher levels of distress than women in the other three clusters. These results highlight the need to consider the psychological profile of women undergoing genetic testing when designing counseling interventions and messages.
doi:10.1080/08870446.2010.521938
PMCID: PMC3197930  PMID: 21756124
breast and ovarian cancer risk; cluster analysis; cognitive profiles; genetic testing; psychological distress
3.  Enhanced Counseling for Women Undergoing BRCA1/2 Testing: Impact on Knowledge and Psychological Distress – Results From a Randomized Clinical Trial 
Psychology & health  2010;25(4):401-415.
This randomized controlled trial evaluated the impact of an enhanced counseling intervention on knowledge about the heritability of breast and ovarian cancer and distress, as a function of BRCA test result, among high-risk women. Before deciding about whether or not to undergo genetic testing, participants were randomly assigned to the enhanced counseling intervention (N = 69), designed to promote cognitive and affective processing of cancer risk information (following the standard individualized counseling session), or to the control condition (N = 65), which involved standard individualized counseling followed by a general health information session to control for time and attention. Women in the enhanced counseling group exhibited greater knowledge than women in the control group one week after the intervention. Further, at the affective level, the intervention was found to be most beneficial for women testing positive: specifically one week after test result disclosure, women in the intervention group who tested positive experienced lower levels of distress than women in the control group who tested positive. The findings suggest that the design of counseling aids should include a component that explicitly activates the individual's cognitive-affective processing system.
doi:10.1080/08870440802660884
PMCID: PMC2866521  PMID: 20204945
Genetic testing; enhanced counseling; intrusive ideation; breast cancer; ovarian cancer

Results 1-3 (3)