PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (44)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
more »
Year of Publication
1.  Dyslipidemia, Coronary Artery Calcium, and Incident Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: Implications for Statin Therapy from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Circulation  2013;129(1):77-86.
Background
Worldwide clinical practice guidelines for dyslipidemia emphasize allocating statin therapy to those at the highest absolute atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk.
Methods and Results
We examined 5,534 MESA participants who were not on baseline medications for dyslipidemia. Participants were classified by baseline CAC score (>0, ≥100) and the common clinical scheme of counting lipid abnormalities (LA), including LDL-C ≥3.36 mmol/L (130 mg/dL), HDL-C <1.03 mmol/L (40 mg/dL) for men or <1.29 mmol/L (50 mg/dL) for women, and triglycerides ≥1.69 mmol/L (150 mg/dL). Our main outcome measure was incident CVD (myocardial infarction, angina resulting in revascularization, resuscitated cardiac arrest, stroke, cardiovascular death). Over a median follow-up of 7.6 years, more than half of events (55%) occurred in the 21% of participants with CAC≥100. Conversely, 65% of events occurred in participants with zero or one LA. In those with CAC≥100, CVD rates ranged from 22.2 to 29.2 per 1,000 person-years across LA categories. In contrast, with CAC=0, CVD rates ranged from 2.4 to 6.2 per 1,000 person-years across LA categories. Individuals with zero LA and CAC≥100 had a higher event rate compared to individuals with three LA but CAC=0 (22.2 vs 6.2 per 1,000 person-years). Similar results were obtained when classifying LA using dataset-quartiles of TC/HDL-C, LDL-C, non-HDL-C, or LDL particle concentration and guideline-categories of LDL-C or non-HDL-C.
Conclusions
CAC may have the potential to help match statin therapy to absolute CVD risk. Across the spectrum of dyslipidemia, event rates similar to secondary prevention populations were observed for patients with CAC≥100.
doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.003625
PMCID: PMC3919521  PMID: 24141324
Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular disease risk factors; Cholesterol; Computed tomography
2.  The Effect of an EDTA-based Chelation Regimen on Patients with Diabetes and Prior Myocardial Infarction in TACT 
Background
The Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) showed clinical benefit of an ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA-based) infusion regimen in patients 50 years or older with prior myocardial infarction (MI). Diabetes prior to enrollment was a pre-specified subgroup.
Methods and Results
Patients received 40 infusions of EDTA chelation or placebo. 633 (37%) had diabetes (322 EDTA, 311 placebo). EDTA reduced the primary endpoint (death, reinfarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for angina) [25% vs 38%, hazard ratio (HR) 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.44, 0.79), p<0.001] over 5 years. The result remained significant after Bonferroni adjustment for multiple subgroups (99.4% CI (0.39, 0.88), adjusted p=0.002). All-cause mortality was reduced by EDTA chelation [10% vs 16%, HR 0.57, 95% CI (0.36, 0.88) p=0.011], as was the secondary endpoint (cardiovascular death, reinfarction, or stroke) [11% vs 17% HR 0.60, 95% CI (0.39, 0.91), p=0.017]. After adjusting for multiple subgroups, however, those results were no longer significant. The number needed to treat to reduce one primary endpoint was 6.5 over 5 years (95% CI (4.4, 12.7). There was no reduction in events in non-diabetics (n=1075, p=0.877), resulting in a treatment by diabetes interaction (p=0.004).
Conclusions
Post-MI diabetic patients age 50 or older demonstrated a marked reduction in cardiovascular events with EDTA chelation. These findings support efforts to replicate these findings and define the mechanisms of benefit. They do not, however, constitute sufficient evidence to indicate the routine use of chelation therapy for all post-MI diabetic patients.
doi:10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.113.000663
PMCID: PMC4111470  PMID: 24254885
myocardial Infarction; diabetes mellitus; secondary prevention
3.  Bone mineral density and atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, Abdominal Aortic Calcium Study 
Atherosclerosis  2009;209(1):283-289.
Context
Molecular and cell biology studies have demonstrated an association between bone and arterial wall disease, but the significance of a population-level association is less clear and potentially confounded by inability to account for shared risk factors.
Objective
To test population-level associations between atherosclerosis types and bone integrity.
Main Outcome Measures
Volumetric trabecular lumbar bone mineral density (vBMD), ankle-brachial index (ABI), intima-media thickness of the common carotid (CCA-IMT) and internal carotid (ICA-IMT) arteries, and carotid plaque echogenicity.
Design, Setting and Participants
A random subset of participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) assessed between 2002 and 2005.
Results
904 post-menopausal female (62.4 years; 62% non-white; 12% ABI<1; 17% CCA-IMT>1mm; 33% ICA-IMT>1mm) and 929 male (61.4 years; 58% non-white; 6% ABI<1; 25% CCA-IMT>1mm; 40% ICA-IMT>1mm) were included. In serial, sex-specific regression models adjusting for age, ethnicity, body mass index, dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking, alcohol consumption, diabetes, homocysteine, interleukin-6, sex hormones, and renal function, lower vBMD was associated with lower ABI in men (p for trend <0.01) and greater ICA-IMT in men (p for trend <0.02). CCA-IMT was not associated with vBMD in men or women. Carotid plaque echogenicity was independently associated with lower vBMD in both men (trend p=0.01) and women (trend p<0.04). In all models, adjustment did not materially affect results.
Conclusions
Lower vBMD is independently associated with structural and functional measures of atherosclerosis in men and with more advanced and calcified carotid atherosclerotic plaques in both sexes.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.09.011
PMCID: PMC4254856  PMID: 19819456
4.  Intakes of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and fish in relation to measurements of subclinical atherosclerosis 
Background
Data on the relations of different types of fish meals and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) with measures of atherosclerosis are sparse.
Objective
We examined intakes of long-chain n-3 PUFAs and fish in relation to clinical measures of subclinical atherosclerosis.
Design
A cross-sectional study was conducted in 5,488 multiethnic adults aged 45–84 years and free of clinical cardiovascular disease. Diet was assessed using self-administered food frequency questionnaires. Subclinical atherosclerosis was determined by common carotid intima-media thickness (cCIMT, >80th percentile), internal CIMT (iCIMT, >80th percentile), coronary artery calcium score (CAC, >0) or ankle-brachial index (ABI, <0.90), respectively.
Results
After adjustment for potential confounders, intakes of long-chain n-3 PUFAs and non-fried (broiled, steamed, baked or raw) fish were inversely related to subclinical atherosclerosis determined by cCIMT but not iCIMT, CAC or ABI. The multivariable odds ratio comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of dietary exposures in relation to subclinical atherosclerosis determined by cCIMT was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.86; p for trend<0.01) for n-3 PUFA intake, 0.80 (95% CI: 0.64, 1.01; p=0.054) for non-fried fish and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.10; p=0.33) for fried fish consumption.
Conclusions
This study indicates that dietary intake of long-chain n-3 PUFAs or non-fried fish is associated with lower prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis classified by cCIMT although significant changes in iCIMT, CAC and ABI were not observed. Our findings also suggest that the association of fish and atherosclerosis may vary depending on the type of fish meal consumed and the measures of atherosclerosis.
PMCID: PMC4151325  PMID: 18842801
long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids; fish; fish oil; biomarker; subclinical atherosclerosis; multi-ethnicities
5.  Physical Activity and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein 
Background
Previous studies have suggested an inverse relationship between physical activity and markers of inflammation such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). However, these were inconsistent, and few examined whether race and gender influenced the relationship. This study determined a cross-sectional association between physical activity and hs-CRP level in 6142 middle-aged white, Chinese, black, and Hispanic participants enrolled in the Multi Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis in 2000–2002.
Methods
Combined moderate and vigorous physical activity was measured by self-reported leisure, conditioning, occupational, and household activities. ANCOVA was used to assess the association between moderate/vigorous physical activity and hs-CRP by gender and race.
Results
Hs-CRP was higher in women. Blacks had the highest hs-CRP, and Chinese participants had the lowest. Hs-CRP decreased across tertiles of moderate/vigorous physical activity in Hispanic men in models adjusted for age, education, study site, and physical activity questionnaire mode of administration (p=0.005) and further adjusted for smoking, infection, and aspirin use (p=0.020). The trend remained significant after further adjustment for BMI; blood pressure; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; diabetes; and the use of antihypertensive, statin, and diabetes medication (p=0.044). There was a downward trend in hs-CRP across tertiles of physical activity in black and white men, but the association was weaker. No clear trend was observed in any female racial/ethnic groups.
Conclusions
These findings suggest that the association between moderate/vigorous physical activity and hs-CRP differs by race and gender. Further studies are needed to confirm this and to examine the mechanisms for these race and gender differences.
doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2008.09.031
PMCID: PMC4122519  PMID: 19013748
6.  Low-Risk Lifestyle, Coronary Calcium, Cardiovascular Events, and Mortality: Results From MESA 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2013;178(1):12-21.
Unhealthy lifestyle habits are a major contributor to coronary artery disease. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the associations of smoking, weight maintenance, physical activity, and diet with coronary calcium, cardiovascular events, and mortality. US participants who were 44–84 years of age (n = 6,229) were followed in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis from 2000 to 2010. A lifestyle score ranging from 0 to 4 was created using diet, exercise, body mass index, and smoking status. Coronary calcium was measured at baseline and a mean of 3.1 (standard deviation, 1.3) years later to assess calcium progression. Participants who experienced coronary events or died were followed for a median of 7.6 (standard deviation, 1.5) years. Participants with lifestyle scores of 1, 2, 3, and 4 were found to have mean adjusted annual calcium progressions that were 3.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.0, 7.0), 4.2 (95% CI: 0.6, 7.9), 6.8 (95% CI: 2.0, 11.5), and 11.1 (95% CI: 2.2, 20.1) points per year slower, respectively, relative to the reference group (P = 0.003). Unadjusted hazard ratios for death by lifestyle score were as follows: for a score of 1, the hazard ratio was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.03); for a score of 2, the hazard ratio was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.46, 0.81); for a score of 3, the hazard ratio was 0.49 (95% CI: 0.32, 0.75); and for a score of 4, the hazard ratio was 0.19 (95% CI: 0.05, 0.75) (P < 0.001 by log-rank test). In conclusion, a combination of regular exercise, healthy diet, smoking avoidance, and weight maintenance was associated with lower coronary calcium incidence, slower calcium progression, and lower all-cause mortality over 7.6 years.
doi:10.1093/aje/kws453
PMCID: PMC3698994  PMID: 23733562
coronary artery disease; CT and MRI; diet; epidemiology; exercise; primary prevention; risk factors; weight reduction
7.  The Association of Endogenous Sex hormones with Lipoprotein Subfraction Profile in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) 
There traditional lipid profile differs by sex hormone levels. However, associations of sex hormones with lipoprotein subfractions, which may more accurately represent metabolic pathways to atherosclerosis, are not well studied. We quantified the cross-sectional associations of endogenous sex hormones with lipoprotein subfractions in 3143 men and 2038 postmenopausal women who were not on hormone replacement therapy, aged 45–84 years, in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis baseline examination. Particle sizes and numbers of Very Low Density (VLDL), Low Density (LDL) and High Density (HDL) Lipoproteins were measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In both men and women, after multivariable adjustment, higher Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) levels are associated with smaller, fewer VLDL, larger, fewer LDL, and larger, more numerous HDL particles; while higher endogenous estradiol levels are associated with smaller VLDL, and smaller, more numerous HDL and LDL particles (all p < 0.05). Testosterone (adjusted for SHBG) is associated with a smaller VLDL particles in men but not women (sex difference p = 0.040). Higher dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels are associated with more numerous, smaller VLDL particles only in women (sex difference p = 0.030, 0.004, respectively). In conclusion, we found sex differences in the association of endogenous androgens with lipoprotein particle sizes and numbers. Higher endogenous estradiol, but lower SHBG is associated with a more atherogenic lipoprotein particle profile. These findings highlight the potential to improve the lipoprotein profile with sex hormones, but emphasize the intricacies of the interactions.
doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2008.01.019
PMCID: PMC4017356  PMID: 18502260
8.  Associations among Lung Function, Arterial Elasticity and Circulating Endothelial and Inflammation Markers: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Hypertension  2013;61(2):542-548.
A parallel physiologic pathway for elastic changes is hypothesized for declines in arterial elasticity and lung function. Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation could potentially decrease elasticity of both vasculature and lung tissue. We examined biomarkers, large (LAE) and small (SAE) arterial elasticity, and forced vital capacity (FVC) in a period cross-sectional design in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, which recruited 1,823 women and 1,803 men, age range 45–84 years, black, white, Hispanic, and Chinese, free of clinically recognized CVD. Radial artery tonometric pulse waveform registration was performed and LAE and SAE were derived from diastole. Spirometric data and markers of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation (soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1, fibrinogen, hs-C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6) were obtained. Mean LAE was 13.7 ± 5.5 ml/mmHgx10 and SAE was 4.6 ± 2.6 ml/mmHgx100. Mean FVC was 3,192 ± 956.0 mL and FEV1 was 2,386 ± 734.5 mL. FVC was about 40 ± 5 mL higher per SD of SAE, stronger in men than women. The association was slightly weaker with LAE, with no sex interaction. After regression adjustment for demographic, anthropometric, and cardiovascular risk factors, the biomarkers tended to be related to reduced SAE and FVC, particularly in men. These biomarker associations suggest important CVD risk alterations that occur concurrently with lower arterial elasticity and lung function. The observed positive association of SAE with FVC and with FEV1 in middle-aged to older free-living people is consistent with the hypothesis of parallel physiologic pathways for elastic changes in the vasculature and in lung parenchymal tissue.
doi:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00272
PMCID: PMC3586233  PMID: 23283358
arterial stiffness; endothelial markers; inflammatory markers; large and small artery elasticity; lung function; MESA Study
10.  Effect of exercise on abdominal fat loss in men and women with and without type 2 diabetes 
BMJ Open  2013;3(11):e003897.
Objective
To examine the effect of exercise on abdominal adipose tissue in adults with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).
Design
Post hoc analysis of two randomised controlled trials.
Setting
Outpatient secondary prevention programme in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
Participants
97 men and women with prehypertension, stage 1 or medically controlled hypertension. 49% of the sample was also diagnosed with T2DM.
Intervention
All participants completed a 26-week (6.5 months) supervised aerobic and resistance exercise programme following American College of Sports Medicine guidelines.
Primary and secondary outcome measures
The main outcomes in this post hoc analysis were total abdominal adipose tissue (TAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) measured by MRI. Secondary outcomes were to determine whether the magnitude of abdominal fat change differed by diabetes status in men and women and to identify the predictors of change in abdominal fat distribution with exercise.
Results
Overall, participants (mean age 61±6 years; 45% women) significantly improved peak oxygen uptake by 15% (p<0.01) and reduced weight by 2% (p<0.01). No change in SAT was observed after training. The reduction in VAT following exercise was attenuated in participants with T2DM (–3%) compared with participants who were non-T2DM (–18%, p<0.001 for the difference in change). The magnitude of VAT loss was associated with a decrease in body weight (r=0.50, p<0.001). After adjustment for weight change using regression analysis, diabetes status remained an independent predictor of the change in VAT.
Conclusions
Although participants with and without T2DM attained an exercise training effect as evidenced by increased fitness, VAT was unchanged in T2DM compared to those without T2DM, suggesting that these individuals may be resistant to this important benefit of exercise. The strategies for reducing cardiovascular disease risk in T2DM may be most effective when they include a weight loss component.
Clinical Trials Registration
Clinicaltrials.gov Registry NCT00212303.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003897
PMCID: PMC3845055  PMID: 24282247
Preventive Medicine
11.  Effect of Exercise on Blood Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial 
Journal of General Internal Medicine  2012;27(11):1453-1459.
BACKGROUND
Increased blood pressure (BP) in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) markedly increases cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality risk compared to having increased BP alone.
OBJECTIVE
To investigate whether exercise reduces suboptimal levels of untreated suboptimal BP or treated hypertension.
DESIGN
Prospective, randomized controlled trial for 6 months.
SETTING
Single center in Baltimore, MD, USA.
PATIENTS
140 participants with T2DM not requiring insulin and untreated SBP of 120–159 or DBP of 85–99 mmHg, or, if being treated for hypertension, any SBP <159 mmHg or DBP < 99 mmHg; 114 completed the study.
INTERVENTION
Supervised exercise, 3 times per week for 6 months compared with general advice about physical activity.
MEASUREMENTS
Resting SBP and DBP (primary outcome); diabetes status, arterial stiffness assessed as carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV), body composition and fitness (secondary outcomes).
RESULTS
Overall baseline BP was 126.8 ± 13.5 / 71.7 ± 9.0 mmHg, with no group differences. At 6 months, BP was unchanged from baseline in either group, BP 125.8 ± 13.2 / 70.7 ± 8.8 mmHg in controls; and 126.0 ± 14.2 / 70.3 ± 9.0 mmHg in exercisers, despite attaining a training effects as evidenced by increased aerobic and strength fitness and lean mass and reduced fat mass (all p < 0.05), Overall baseline PWV was 959.9 ± 333.1 cm/s, with no group difference. At 6-months, PWV did not change and was not different between group; exercisers, 923.7 ± 319.8 cm/s, 905.5 ± 344.7, controls.
LIMITATIONS
A completion rate of 81 %.
CONCLUSIONS
Though exercisers improve fitness and body composition, there were no reductions in BP. The lack of change in arterial stiffness suggests a resistance to exercise-induced BP reduction in persons with T2DM.
doi:10.1007/s11606-012-2103-8
PMCID: PMC3475835  PMID: 22610907
exercise training; diabetes; high blood pressure; randomized trial
12.  Early Menopause Predicts Future Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)  2012;19(10):1081-1087.
Objective
Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Identifying women at risk of cardiovascular disease has tremendous public health importance. Early menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease events in some predominantly white populations, but not consistently. Our objective was to determine if a self-reported early menopause (menopause at an age <46) identifies women as at risk for future coronary heart disease or stroke.
Methods
The study population came from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a longitudinal, ethnically diverse cohort study of US men and women aged 45 to 84 years enrolled in 2000–2002 and followed up until 2008. The association between a personal history of early menopause (either natural menopause or surgical removal of ovaries at an age <46) and future coronary heart disease and stroke was assessed in 2509 women (ages 45–84, 987 White, 331 Chinese, 641 Black, 550 Hispanic) from the Multi-Ethnic Study Atherosclerosis, who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline.
Results
693/2509 (28%) of women reported either surgical or natural early menopause. In survival curves, women with early menopause had worse coronary heart disease and stroke-free survival (log rank p=<0.008 and 0.0158). In models adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, Multi-Ethnic Study Atherosclerosis site and traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, this risk for coronary heart disease and stroke remained (HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.17, 3.70 and 2.19, 95% CI 1.11, 4.32, respectively).
Conclusions
Early menopause is positively associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in a multiethnic cohort, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors.
doi:10.1097/gme.0b013e3182517bd0
PMCID: PMC3443540  PMID: 22692332
Early Menopause; Coronary Heart Disease; Stroke
13.  Progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Arthritis Research & Therapy  2013;15(5):R134.
Introduction
In cross-sectional studies, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have higher coronary artery calcium (CAC) than controls. However, their rate of progression of CAC and the predictors of CAC progression have heretofore remained unknown.
Methods
Incidence and progression of CAC were compared in 155 patients with RA and 835 control participants. The association of demographic characteristics, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, RA disease characteristics and selected inflammatory markers with incidence and progression of CAC were evaluated.
Results
The incidence rate of newly detected CAC was 8.2/100 person-years in RA and 7.3/100 person-years in non-RA control subjects [IRR 1.1 (0.7-1.8)]. RA patients who developed newly detectable CAC were older (59±7 vs. 55±6 years old, p=0.03), had higher triglyceride levels (137±86 vs. 97±60 mg/dL, p=0.03), and higher systolic blood pressure (129±17 vs. 117±15 mm Hg, p=0.01) compared to those who did not develop incident CAC. Differences in blood pressure and triglyceride levels remained significant after adjustment for age (p<=0.05). RA patients with any CAC at baseline had a median rate of yearly progression of 21 (7–62) compared to 21 (5–70) Agatston units in controls. No statistical differences between RA progressors and RA non-progressors were observed for inflammatory markers or for RA disease characteristics.
Conclusions
The incidence and progression of CAC did not differ between RA and non-RA participants. In patients with RA, incident CAC was associated with older age, higher triglyceride levels, and higher blood pressure, but not with inflammatory markers or RA disease characteristics.
doi:10.1186/ar4314
PMCID: PMC3978773  PMID: 24286380
14.  ENDOGENOUS SEX HORMONES, BLOOD PRESSURE CHANGE, AND RISK OF HYPERTENSION IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN: THE MULTI-ETHNIC STUDY OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS 
Atherosclerosis  2012;224(1):228-234.
Objective
Sex steroid hormones have been postulated to involve in blood pressure (BP) regulation. We examine the association of endogenous sex hormone levels with longitudinal change of BP and risk of developing hypertension in initially normotensive postmenopausal women.
Methods
We conducted prospective analysis among 619 postmenopausal women free of hypertension at baseline in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Change of BP and development of incident hypertension were assessed during a mean of 4.8 years follow-up.
Results
After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and lifestyle factors, baseline serum estradiol (E2), total and bioavailable testosterone (T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were each positively and sex- hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was inversely associated with risk of hypertension. Additional adjustment for body mass index eliminated the associations for E2 and T but only attenuated the associations for DHEA and SHBG. The corresponding multivariable hazard ratios (95% CIs) in the highest quartile were 1.28 (0.83–1.97) for E2, 1.38 (0.89–2.14) for total T, 1.42 (0.90–2.23) for bioavailable T, 1.54 (1.02–2.31) for DHEA, and 0.48 (0.30–0.76) for SHBG. Adjustment for fasting glucose, insulin, and C-reactive protein further attenuated the association for DHEA but not SHBG. Associations of sex hormones with longitudinal BP change were similar.
Conclusion
In postmenopausal women, higher endogenous E2, T, and DHEA and lower SHBG were associated with higher incidence of hypertension and greater longitudinal rise in BP. The associations for E2, T, and DHEA were mostly explained by adiposity, while the association for SHBG was independent of measures of adiposity, insulin resistance, and systemic inflammation.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2012.07.005
PMCID: PMC3428144  PMID: 22862963
sex steroid hormones; hypertension; blood pressure; postmenopausal women; prospective study; epidemiology
15.  Association of Sex Hormones and SHBG with Depressive Symptoms in Post-menopausal Women: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Menopause (New York, N.y.)  2012;19(8):877-885.
Objective
Sex hormones are thought to play an important role in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders in women. This study assessed the associations of total testosterone (T), bioavailable T, estradiol (E2), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) with depressive symptoms stratified on postmenopausal stage to determine whether associations were strongest for early postmenopausal women.
Methods
Women (N=1824) free of depressive symptoms at baseline (2000–2002) in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis were categorized into tertiles of years postmenopause: T1, 0–10 years; T2, 11–20 years; and T3, 21–58 years. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals were computed for the incidence of depressive symptoms, as defined by a score of 16 or higher on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale at examination 3 (2004–2005).
Results
In analysis including all sex hormones, the RRs for incident depressive symptoms associated with 1 unit higher log(total T) was 0.57 (p=0.13), log(E2) was 0.78 (p=0.04), log(SHBG) was 1.84 (p=0.003) and log(DHEA) was 1.45 (p=0.08) in T1. Without adjustment for SHBG, the RR for log(bioavailable T) was 0.16 (p=0.04). However, in T2 and T3, there were no meaningful associations of hormone or SHBG levels with incident depressive symptoms. When stratified by HT use, results were consistent for HT users but attenuated for HT non-users.
Conclusions
In women early postmenopause, sex hormones were associated with incident depressive symptoms.
doi:10.1097/gme.0b013e3182432de6
PMCID: PMC3376685  PMID: 22415566
sex hormones; CES-D; depression; testosterone; estradiol; SHBG
16.  Bilateral Oophorectomy, Body Mass Index, and Mortality in U.S. Women Aged 40 Years and Older 
Bilateral oophorectomy is used as a risk reduction strategy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, although data on long-term side effects are not yet available. In the general population, oophorectomy, particularly at a young age, has been associated with increased overall and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. The mechanisms for this association are not well understood. We examined the association between prior bilateral oophorectomy, obesity, and all-cause, cancer, and CVD mortality. Our study population included women ages 40 and above from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), a nationally representative survey with enrollment from 1988 to 1994 and prospective mortality follow-up through December 31, 2006. We excluded women with a history of reproductive cancer or missing oophorectomy status, yielding a study population of 4,040. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to estimate HR for all-cause and cause-specific mortality. In multivariate analyses, body mass index (BMI) significantly modified the association between oophorectomy and mortality (Pinteraction = 0.04). Women who were obese at the time of interview and who had an oophorectomy at less than 40 years were more than twice as likely to die [HR, 2.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25–3.98], particularly of CVD (HR, 2.77; 95% CI, 0.91–8.41), than nonobese women with intact ovaries. These associations persisted after excluding women who used estrogen therapy and women who had oophorectomy before 35 years of age. The joint effect of obesity and early oophorectomy on mortality was significantly greater than expected, given the independent effects of both exposures. Our results suggest that minimizing weight gain after oophorectomy and addressing cardiovascular risk factors could beneficially impact mortality.
doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-11-0430
PMCID: PMC3401905  PMID: 22556202
17.  Association of Baseline Sex Hormone Levels with Baseline and Longitudinal Changes in Waist-to-Hip Ratio : Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Objective
Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) is strongly associated with prevalent atherosclerosis. We analyzed the associations of baseline serum levels of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) with WHR in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort.
Subjects
Baseline data was available for 3144 men and 2038 postmenopausal women, who were non-users of hormone therapy, who were 45–84 years of age, and of White, Chinese, Black or Hispanic racial/ethnic groups. Of these, 2708 men and 1678 women also had longitudinal measurements of WHR measured at the second and/or the third study visits (median follow-up 578 days, and 1135 days, respectively).
Results
In cross-sectional analyses adjusted for age, race, and cardiovascular disease risk factors, T was negatively associated with baseline WHR in men, while in both sexes, E2 was positively associated and SHBG was negatively associated with WHR (all p<0.001). In longitudinal analyses, further adjusted for follow-up time and baseline WHR, baseline T was negatively associated with WHR at follow-up (p=0.001) in men, while in both sexes, E2 was positively associated (p=0.004), and SHBG was negatively associated with WHR (p<0.001). The longitudinal association of E2, but not T, was independent of SHBG. In both cross-sectional or longitudinal analyses, there were no associations between DHEA and WHR in either men or women.
Conclusion
Sex hormones are associated with WHR at baseline and also during follow-up above and beyond their baseline association. Future research is needed to determine if manipulation of hormones is associated with changes in central obesity.
doi:10.1038/ijo.2012.3
PMCID: PMC3342434  PMID: 22270378
Sex Hormones; epidemiology; waist to hip ratio
18.  Association of number of live births with left ventricular structure and function. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) 
American heart journal  2012;163(3):470-476.
Background
Pregnancy is associated with marked maternal cardiovascular/hemodynamic changes. A greater number of pregnancies may be associated with long-term subclinical changes in left ventricular (LV) remodeling.
Methods
Among 2,234 white, black, Hispanic, and Chinese women (mean age 62 years) in the MESA, we used linear regression to relate live births and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging LV measures. Covariates included age, ethnicity, height, income, education, birth country, smoking, menopause, and oral contraceptive duration. Models were additionally adjusted for potential mediators: systolic blood pressure, antihypertensive use, total/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, diabetes, and body mass index. We performed sensitivity analyses excluding 763 women in the lowest socioeconomic group: annual income <$25,000 and lower high school level of education.
Results
With each live birth, LV mass increased 1.26 g; LV end-diastolic volume, 0.74 mL; and LV end-systolic volume, 0.45 mL; LV ejection fraction decreased 0.18% (P trend <0.05). Changes were most notable for the category of women with ≥5 pregnancies. Upon adjustment for potential biologic mediators, live births remained positively associated with LV mass and end-systolic volume. Live births remained significantly associated with LV end-systolic, end-diastolic volumes, and LV mass (P trend ≤0.02) after excluding women in the lowest socioeconomic group.
Conclusions
Number of live births is associated with key LV structural and functional measures in middle to older ages, even after adjustment for sociodemographic factors and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Hemodynamic changes during pregnancy may be associated with cardiac structure/function beyond childbearing years.
doi:10.1016/j.ahj.2011.12.011
PMCID: PMC3656723  PMID: 22424019
19.  Sex-Specific Association of Age with Carotid Artery Distensibility: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Journal of Women's Health  2012;21(5):516-520.
Abstract
Background
Older women have a higher prevalence of systolic hypertension than do men; however, whether or not this relates to arterial properties, such as distensibility coefficient (DC), is not known. We examined whether the association of carotid artery DC with age differed by sex in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).
Methods
B-mode ultrasound-measured carotid diameters and brachial pressures were obtained from 6359 participants (53% female, 38% white, 12% Chinese, 27% black, 22% Hispanic, aged 45–85 years) of the MESA baseline examination. The within-individual slopes of 2log(diameter) vs. blood pressure fit using mixed models (MM) are interpreted as the DC, and interaction terms are interpreted as differences in DC. The MM calculation allows for correction of the confounding caused by the association of age, sex, and race with blood pressure, the denominator in the calculation of DC.
Results
DC was associated with age, sex, and race (all p<0.001). Women had a greater age-related lowering of DC compared to men (2.52×10−5 vs. 2.16×10−5/mm Hg lower DC per year of age, p=0.006). Mean diameter of carotid arteries was greater with age (p<0.001); this association also was significantly stronger in women compared to men (0.24% vs. 0.14% larger mean carotid diameter per year of age, p<0.001).
Conclusions
Greater stiffening and enlargement of arteries are seen in older women compared to older men. This implies that the afterload on the heart of older women is likely to be greater than that among older men.
doi:10.1089/jwh.2011.3220
PMCID: PMC3353825  PMID: 22393881
20.  Comparison of breast cancer recurrence risk and cardiovascular disease incidence risk among postmenopausal women with breast cancer 
The majority of breast cancers are diagnosed in postmenopausal women. Competing comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular disease (CVD), should be considered when individualizing adjuvant therapies for these women. We compared the 10-year predicted breast cancer recurrence risk with CVD risk among postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), non-metastatic breast cancer. CVD risk factor data were prospectively collected from postmenopausal women with stage I-III, HR+ breast cancer initiating adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy. We compared predicted 10-year CVD risk, including the composite index heart age, computed from modified Framingham risk score, with predicted 10-year risk of breast cancer recurrence using Adjuvant! Online. We created multivariable logistic regression models to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for greater CVD risk than breast cancer recurrence risk. Among 415 women, mean age and heart age were 60 and 67 years, respectively. Overall, 43% of women had a predicted 10-year CVD risk equivalent to breast cancer recurrence risk and 37% had CVD risk higher than breast cancer recurrence risk. Predicted CVD risk was higher than breast cancer recurrence risk for stage I disease (OR: 6.1, 95% CI: 3.4–11.2) or heart age >65 (OR: 12.4, 95% CI: 7.0–22.6). The majority of postmenopausal women with HR+ early breast cancer had a predicted 10-year CVD risk that was equivalent to or higher than breast cancer recurrence risk. Physicians should weigh competing risks and offer early screening and cardiac prevention strategies for women at a greater risk for CVD.
doi:10.1007/s10549-011-1843-1
PMCID: PMC3582017  PMID: 22042368
Breast cancer risk; Cardiovascular disease risk; Adjuvant! Online; Modified Framingham risk score; Cancer survivorship
21.  Prevalence of Traditional Modifiable Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: Comparison with Control Subjects from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Objective
Despite the recognized risk of accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), little is known about cardiovascular risk management in contemporary cohorts of these patients. We tested the hypotheses that major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors were more frequent and rates of treatment, detection, and control were lower in patients with RA than in non-RA controls.
Methods
The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, elevated body mass index, smoking, moderate-high 10-year cardiovascular risk and the rates of underdiagnosis, therapeutic treatment, and recommended management were compared in 197 RA patients and 274 frequency-matched control subjects, and their associations with clinical characteristics were examined.
Results
Eighty percent of RA patients and 81% of control subjects had at least 1 modifiable traditional cardiovascular risk factor. Hypertension was more prevalent in the RA group (57%) than in controls [42%, P =0.001]. There were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of diabetes, elevated body mass index, smoking, intermediate-high 10-year coronary heart disease risk, or elevated LDL in patients with RA versus controls. Rates of newly identified diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia were similar in RA patients versus controls. Rates of therapeutic interventions were low in both groups but their use was associated with well-controlled blood pressure (OR = 4.55, 95% CI: 1.70, 12.19) and lipid levels (OR = 9.90, 95% CI: 3.30, 29.67).
Conclusions
Hypertension is more common in RA than in controls. Other traditional cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent, underdiagnosed, and poorly controlled in patients with RA, as well as controls.
doi:10.1016/j.semarthrit.2011.07.004
PMCID: PMC3538033  PMID: 22340996
rheumatoid arthritis; cardiovascular risk; epidemiology
22.  Association Between Sleep Apnea, Snoring, Incident Cardiovascular Events and All-Cause Mortality in an Adult Population. MESA 
Atherosclerosis  2011;219(2):963-968.
Background
We assessed the association between sleep apnea, snoring, incident cardiovascular (CV) events and all-cause mortality in the Multi Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort.
Methods
Out of 5338 respondents to a sleep questionnaire administered during the second MESA exam period, 208 had physician-diagnosed sleep apnea (PDSA), 1452 were habitual snorers (HS) and 3678 were neither a habitual snorer nor had PDSA (normal participants). Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to assess the associations adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, diabetes mellitus, total cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, BMI, current alcohol use, benzodiazepine use, BP medications and statin use.
Results
Over a 7.5 year average follow-up period, 310 adjudicated CV events including MI, stroke, angina, resuscitated cardiac arrest, stroke death and CVD death and 189 deaths occurred. Compared to HS, PDSA was associated with higher incident CV rates in both univariate and multivariable models [hazard ratio (95%); 1.89(1.22–2.93), p=0.004 and 1.91(1.20 –3.04), p=0.007 respectively]. PDSA was also associated with a higher death rates compared with HS [hazard ratio (95%); 2.13(1.25 – 3.63), p=0.006 and 2.70(1.52– 4.79), p=0.007 respectively]. Compared with normal participants, PDSA had higher incident CV event rates in both univariate and multivariable models [hazard ratio (95%); 2.23[1.39–3.60], p=0.001 and 2.16[1.30–3.58], p=0.003 respectively]. Similarly, PDSA had a higher death rate compared with normal participants in both the univariate and multivariable models [hazard ratio (95%CI); 2.44(1.36 – 4.37), p=0.003 and 2.71(1.45 – 5.08), p=0.002 respectively]. Habitual snorers had similar incident CV event rates and death rates in both univariate and multivariable models compared with normal participants.
Conclusion
PDSA but not habitual snoring was associated with high incident CV events and all-cause mortality in a multi-ethnic population based study of adults free of clinical CV disease at baseline.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2011.08.021
PMCID: PMC3255297  PMID: 22078131
Obstructive sleep apnea; habitual snorers; cardiovascular events; mortality; population
23.  Sex-Steroid Hormones and Electrocardiographic QT-Interval Duration: Findings From the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2011;174(4):403-411.
The association between physiologic levels of sex hormones and QT-interval duration in humans was evaluated using data from 727 men enrolled in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and 2,942 men and 1,885 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Testosterone, estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured in serum and free testosterone was calculated from those values. QT interval was measured using a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram. In men from the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey, the multivariate adjusted differences in average QT-interval duration comparing the highest quartiles with the lowest quartiles of total testosterone and free testosterone were −8.5 ms (95% confidence interval (CI): −15.5, −1.4) and −8.0 ms (95% CI: −13.2, −2.8), respectively. The corresponding differences were −1.8 ms (95% CI: −3.8, −0.2), and −4.7 ms (95% CI: −6.7, −2.6), respectively, in men from MESA and −0.6 ms (95% CI: −3.0, 1.8) and 0.8 ms (95% CI: −1.6, 3.3), respectively, in postmenopausal women from MESA. Estradiol levels were not associated with QT-interval duration in men, but there was a marginally significant positive association in postmenopausal women. The findings suggest that testosterone levels may explain differences in QT-interval duration between men and women and could be a contributor to population variability in QT-interval duration among men.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwr172
PMCID: PMC3202165  PMID: 21768401
electrocardiography; estradiol; gonadal sex hormones; testosterone
24.  A Genome-Wide Association Meta-Analysis of Circulating Sex Hormone–Binding Globulin Reveals Multiple Loci Implicated in Sex Steroid Hormone Regulation 
Coviello, Andrea D. | Haring, Robin | Wellons, Melissa | Vaidya, Dhananjay | Lehtimäki, Terho | Keildson, Sarah | Lunetta, Kathryn L. | He, Chunyan | Fornage, Myriam | Lagou, Vasiliki | Mangino, Massimo | Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte | Chen, Brian | Eriksson, Joel | Garcia, Melissa | Liu, Yong Mei | Koster, Annemarie | Lohman, Kurt | Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka | Petersen, Ann-Kristin | Prescott, Jennifer | Stolk, Lisette | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Wood, Andrew R. | Zhuang, Wei Vivian | Ruokonen, Aimo | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Pouta, Anneli | Bandinelli, Stefania | Biffar, Reiner | Brabant, Georg | Cox, David G. | Chen, Yuhui | Cummings, Steven | Ferrucci, Luigi | Gunter, Marc J. | Hankinson, Susan E. | Martikainen, Hannu | Hofman, Albert | Homuth, Georg | Illig, Thomas | Jansson, John-Olov | Johnson, Andrew D. | Karasik, David | Karlsson, Magnus | Kettunen, Johannes | Kiel, Douglas P. | Kraft, Peter | Liu, Jingmin | Ljunggren, Östen | Lorentzon, Mattias | Maggio, Marcello | Markus, Marcello R. P. | Mellström, Dan | Miljkovic, Iva | Mirel, Daniel | Nelson, Sarah | Morin Papunen, Laure | Peeters, Petra H. M. | Prokopenko, Inga | Raffel, Leslie | Reincke, Martin | Reiner, Alex P. | Rexrode, Kathryn | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Schwartz, Stephen M. | Siscovick, David | Soranzo, Nicole | Stöckl, Doris | Tworoger, Shelley | Uitterlinden, André G. | van Gils, Carla H. | Vasan, Ramachandran S. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Zhai, Guangju | Bhasin, Shalender | Bidlingmaier, Martin | Chanock, Stephen J. | De Vivo, Immaculata | Harris, Tamara B. | Hunter, David J. | Kähönen, Mika | Liu, Simin | Ouyang, Pamela | Spector, Tim D. | van der Schouw, Yvonne T. | Viikari, Jorma | Wallaschofski, Henri | McCarthy, Mark I. | Frayling, Timothy M. | Murray, Anna | Franks, Steve | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | de Jong, Frank H. | Raitakari, Olli | Teumer, Alexander | Ohlsson, Claes | Murabito, Joanne M. | Perry, John R. B.
PLoS Genetics  2012;8(7):e1002805.
Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a glycoprotein responsible for the transport and biologic availability of sex steroid hormones, primarily testosterone and estradiol. SHBG has been associated with chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and with hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 21,791 individuals from 10 epidemiologic studies and validated these findings in 7,046 individuals in an additional six studies. We identified twelve genomic regions (SNPs) associated with circulating SHBG concentrations. Loci near the identified SNPs included SHBG (rs12150660, 17p13.1, p = 1.8×10−106), PRMT6 (rs17496332, 1p13.3, p = 1.4×10−11), GCKR (rs780093, 2p23.3, p = 2.2×10−16), ZBTB10 (rs440837, 8q21.13, p = 3.4×10−09), JMJD1C (rs7910927, 10q21.3, p = 6.1×10−35), SLCO1B1 (rs4149056, 12p12.1, p = 1.9×10−08), NR2F2 (rs8023580, 15q26.2, p = 8.3×10−12), ZNF652 (rs2411984, 17q21.32, p = 3.5×10−14), TDGF3 (rs1573036, Xq22.3, p = 4.1×10−14), LHCGR (rs10454142, 2p16.3, p = 1.3×10−07), BAIAP2L1 (rs3779195, 7q21.3, p = 2.7×10−08), and UGT2B15 (rs293428, 4q13.2, p = 5.5×10−06). These genes encompass multiple biologic pathways, including hepatic function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and T2D, androgen and estrogen receptor function, epigenetic effects, and the biology of sex steroid hormone-responsive cancers including breast and prostate cancer. We found evidence of sex-differentiated genetic influences on SHBG. In a sex-specific GWAS, the loci 4q13.2-UGT2B15 was significant in men only (men p = 2.5×10−08, women p = 0.66, heterogeneity p = 0.003). Additionally, three loci showed strong sex-differentiated effects: 17p13.1-SHBG and Xq22.3-TDGF3 were stronger in men, whereas 8q21.12-ZBTB10 was stronger in women. Conditional analyses identified additional signals at the SHBG gene that together almost double the proportion of variance explained at the locus. Using an independent study of 1,129 individuals, all SNPs identified in the overall or sex-differentiated or conditional analyses explained ∼15.6% and ∼8.4% of the genetic variation of SHBG concentrations in men and women, respectively. The evidence for sex-differentiated effects and allelic heterogeneity highlight the importance of considering these features when estimating complex trait variance.
Author Summary
Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the key protein responsible for binding and transporting the sex steroid hormones, testosterone and estradiol, in the circulatory system. SHBG regulates their bioavailability and therefore their effects in the body. SHBG has been linked to chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes and to hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. SHBG concentrations are approximately 50% heritable in family studies, suggesting SHBG concentrations are under significant genetic control; yet, little is known about the specific genes that influence SHBG. We conducted a large study of the association of SHBG concentrations with markers in the human genome in ∼22,000 white men and women to determine which loci influence SHBG concentrations. Genes near the identified genomic markers in addition to the SHBG protein coding gene included PRMT6, GCKR, ZBTB10, JMJD1C, SLCO1B1, NR2F2, ZNF652, TDGF3, LHCGR, BAIAP2L1, and UGT2B15. These genes represent a wide range of biologic pathways that may relate to SHBG function and sex steroid hormone biology, including liver function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and type 2 diabetes, and the development and progression of sex steroid hormone-responsive cancers.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002805
PMCID: PMC3400553  PMID: 22829776

Results 1-25 (44)