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1.  Mortality and health-related quality of life in prevalent dialysis patients: Comparison between 12-items and 36-items short-form health survey 
Background
To assess health- related quality of life (HRQOL) with SF-12 and SF-36 and compare their abilities to predict mortality in chronic dialysis patients, after adjusting for traditional risk factors.
Methods
The Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) with the embedded SF-12 was applied in 301 dialysis patients cross-sectionally. Physical and mental component summary (PCS-36, MCS-36, PCS-12, and MCS-12) scores were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were collected. Mortality (followed for up to 4.5 years) was analyzed with Kaplan Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards, after censoring for renal transplantation. Exclusion factors were observation time <2 months (n = 21) and missing component summary scores (n = 10 for SF-36; n = 28 for SF-12), thus 252 patient were included in the analyses.
Results
In 252 patients (60.2 ± 15.5 years, 65.9% males, dialysis vintage 9.0, IQR 5.0-23.0 months), mortality during follow-up was 33.7%.(85 deaths). Significant correlations were observed between PCS-36 and PCS-12 (ρ = 0.93, p < 0.001) and between MCS-36 and MCS-12 (ρ = 0.95, p < 0.001). Mortality rate was highest in patients in the lowest quartile of PCS-12 (χ2 = 15.3, p = 0.002) and PCS-36 (χ2 = 16.7, p = 0.001). MCS was not associated with mortality. Adjusted hazard ratios for mortality were 2.5 (95% CI 1.0-6.3, PCS-12) and 2.7 (1.1 – 6.4, PCS-36) for the lowest compared with the highest (“best perceived”) quartile of PCS.
Conclusion
Compromised HRQOL is an independent predictor of poor outcome in dialysis patients. The SF-12 provided similar predictions of mortality as SF-36, and may serve as an applicable clinical tool because it requires less time to complete.
doi:10.1186/1477-7525-10-46
PMCID: PMC3464967  PMID: 22559816
Chronic kidney disease; Dialysis; Health-related quality of life; Mortality; Physical component summary score; SF-12 and SF-36
2.  Factors affecting health status in COPD patients with co-morbid anxiety or depression 
Health status questionnaires provide standardized measures of patients’ perceptions of the impact of disease on their daily life and well-being. Factors associated with health status were examined in a sample of 58 outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and co-morbid anxiety and/or depression. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with the following measures: The St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ); the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI); the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI); the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); and spirometry. Disease severity as measured with spirometry was not related to health status. Perceptions of poor health as implied by the health status scores were positively associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression, sleep disturbances, and level of daily functioning. There were statistically significant differences between men and women on COPD severity, age, and the BAI scores. The findings emphasize the importance of screening the patients at all stages of disease severity for anxiety, depression, and sleeping problems, in order to provide adequate care for these problems.
PMCID: PMC2695194  PMID: 18229570
COPD; health status; health-related quality of life; anxiety; depression; sleep
3.  Comparing Physical Exercise in Groups to Group Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for the Treatment of Panic Disorder in a Randomized Controlled Trial 
Background: Previous studies have suggested that physical exercise can reduce symptoms for subjects suffering from panic disorder (PD). The efficacy of this intervention has so far not been compared to an established psychotherapy, such as cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). Assessment of controlled long-term effects and the clinical significance of the treatment are also lacking. Aim: To compare physical exercise to CBT as treatment for PD, and assess controlled long-term and clinically significant effects. Method: PD-patients were randomized to either three weekly sessions of physical exercise (n = 17), or one weekly session of CBT (n = 19). Both treatments ran for 12 weeks, were manualized and administered in groups. Patients were assessed twice before the start of treatment, at post-treatment and at 6 and 12 months thereafter. Primary outcome-measures consisted of the Mobility Inventory (MI), the Agoraphobia Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ) and the Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ). Results: A two-way repeated measures MANOVA of these measures demonstrated a significant effect of time, F(16, 544) = 7.28, p < .01, as well as a significant interaction effect, F(16, 544) = 1.71, p < .05, in favour of CBT. This finding was supported by the assessment of clinically significant changes of avoidant behaviour and of treatment-seeking one year later. Conclusion: Group CBT is more effective than group physical exercise as treatment of panic disorder, both immediately following treatment and at follow-up assessments.
doi:10.1017/S1352465812000446
PMCID: PMC3675676  PMID: 22874661
Exercise; cognitive behaviour therapy; panic disorder; anxiety

Results 1-3 (3)