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1.  Infrared venography of the hand in Apert syndrome 
As well as craniofacial synostosis, complex syndactyly of hands is a distinctive feature of Apert syndrome. Consideration of blood flow to the digits is very important in separation surgery. Several reports offer information about arterial distribution in Apert's hands. Though, venous pattern has not been well discussed. Infrared venography offers a real-time image with minimal invasion. An Apert syndrome patient underwent a series of finger splitting surgeries. Infrared venography was carried out to assess veins. There was a palmar venous arch, placing distally to the metacarpophalangeal joint. The arch had to be cut to divide fused fingers sufficiently. As well as arterial abnormality, venous uniqueness should be noted in Apert syndactyly surgeries. Infrared venography, which can be carried out easily, offers good information that surgeon require.
doi:10.4103/0970-0358.122027
PMCID: PMC3897110  PMID: 24459355
Anomaly; Apert syndrome; hand; infrared; syndactyly; vein
2.  Long-term disease-free survival after radical local excision of low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma of the vulva☆ 
Highlights
•A second case of low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma of the vulva.•Six-year follow-up with no evidence of disease after radical local excision.•Adequate margin resection is important.
doi:10.1016/j.gynor.2013.03.006
PMCID: PMC3862312  PMID: 24371691
Low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma; Sarcoma of the vulva
3.  Supplementation of bone marrow aspirate-derived platelet-rich plasma for treating radiation-induced ulcer after cardiac fluoroscopic procedures: A preliminary report 
Background:
The frequency of encountering radiodermatitis caused by X-ray fluoroscopic procedures for ischaemic heart disease is increasing. In severe cases, devastating ulcers with pain, for which conservative therapy is ineffective, emerge. Radiation-induced ulcers are notorious for being difficult to treat. Simple skin grafting often fails because of the poor state of the wound bed. A vascularized flap is a very good option. However, the non-adherence of the well-vascularized flap with the irradiated wound bed is frequently experienced.
Aim:
To ameliorate the irradiated wound bed, bone marrow-derived platelet-rich plasma (bm-PRP) was delivered during the surgery.
Materials and Methods:
Four patients with severe cutaneous radiation injury accompanied by unbearable pain after multiple fluoroscopic procedures for ischaemic heart disease were treated. Wide excision of the lesion and coverage with a skin flap supplemented with bm-PRP injection was performed.
Results:
All patients obtained wound closure and were relieved from pain. No complication concerning the bone marrow aspiration and delivery of bm-PRP was observed.
Conclusions:
Supplementation of bm-PRP can be an option without major complications, time, and cost to improve the surgical outcome for irradiated wounds.
doi:10.4103/0970-0358.96599
PMCID: PMC3385373  PMID: 22754164
Bone marrow; cardiac fluoroscopy; platelet-rich plasma; radiation ulcer; skin flap
4.  Calcium-Based Nanoparticles Accelerate Skin Wound Healing 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(11):e27106.
Introduction
Nanoparticles (NPs) are small entities that consist of a hydroxyapatite core, which can bind ions, proteins, and other organic molecules from the surrounding environment. These small conglomerations can influence environmental calcium levels and have the potential to modulate calcium homeostasis in vivo. Nanoparticles have been associated with various calcium-mediated disease processes, such as atherosclerosis and kidney stone formation. We hypothesized that nanoparticles could have an effect on other calcium-regulated processes, such as wound healing. In the present study, we synthesized pH-sensitive calcium-based nanoparticles and investigated their ability to enhance cutaneous wound repair.
Methods
Different populations of nanoparticles were synthesized on collagen-coated plates under various growth conditions. Bilateral dorsal cutaneous wounds were made on 8-week-old female Balb/c mice. Nanoparticles were then either administered intravenously or applied topically to the wound bed. The rate of wound closure was quantified. Intravenously injected nanoparticles were tracked using a FLAG detection system. The effect of nanoparticles on fibroblast contraction and proliferation was assessed.
Results
A population of pH-sensitive calcium-based nanoparticles was identified. When intravenously administered, these nanoparticles acutely increased the rate of wound healing. Intravenously administered nanoparticles were localized to the wound site, as evidenced by FLAG staining. Nanoparticles increased fibroblast calcium uptake in vitro and caused contracture of a fibroblast populated collagen lattice in a dose-dependent manner. Nanoparticles also increased the rate of fibroblast proliferation.
Conclusion
Intravenously administered, calcium-based nanoparticles can acutely decrease open wound size via contracture. We hypothesize that their contraction effect is mediated by the release of ionized calcium into the wound bed, which occurs when the pH-sensitive nanoparticles disintegrate in the acidic wound microenvironment. This is the first study to demonstrate that calcium-based nanoparticles can have a therapeutic benefit, which has important implications for the treatment of wounds.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027106
PMCID: PMC3206933  PMID: 22073267

Results 1-4 (4)