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1.  Priapism Induced by Boceprevir-CYP3A4 Inhibition and α-Adrenergic Blockade: Case Report 
A 44 year-old Caucasian male presented to the emergency department with a three day history of priapism requiring a surgically performed distal penile shunt. A drug-drug interaction is the suspected cause whereby CYP3A4 inhibition by boceprevir led to increased exposures of doxazosin, tamsulosin and/or quetiapine, resulting in additional α-adrenergic blockade.
A 44-year-old white man presented to the emergency department with a 3-day history of priapism requiring a surgically performed distal penile shunt. A drug–drug interaction is the suspected cause whereby CYP3A4 inhibition by boceprevir led to increased exposures of doxazosin, tamsulosin, and/or quetiapine, resulting in additional α-adrenergic blockade.
doi:10.1093/cid/cit673
PMCID: PMC4049070  PMID: 24092799
priapism; boceprevir; α-adrenergic; drug interaction; quetiapine
2.  Toward “The Genius of the AND”: Balancing Professionalism and Duty Hour Requirements in Graduate Medical Education 
Although enhancing professionalism and ensuring compliance with duty hour regulations both represent important priorities of current graduate medical education, tension in reconciling these goals has been expressed. The term tyranny of the OR has been coined to express the assumption of dichotomous thinking, that is, that we assume we must choose between seemingly competing goals. In contrast, because there is powerful creative value in adopting a bridging mindset, an alternative state called the genius of the AND has been defined to express the benefits of reconciling perceived competing goals.
doi:10.4300/JGME-D-11-00111.1
PMCID: PMC3179216  PMID: 22942952
3.  A Pilot Study of a “Resident Educator And Life-long Learner” Program: Using a Faculty Train-the-Trainer Program 
Purpose
We sought to create a resident educator program using a Train-the-Trainer (TTT) approach with adaptable curricula at a large tertiary health care center with a medical school and 60 accredited residency programs.
Methods
The Resident Educator And Life-long Learner (REALL) Program was designed as a 3-phase model. Phase 1 included centralized planning and development that led to the design of 7 teaching modules and evaluation tools for TTT and resident sessions. Phase 2 entailed the dissemination of the TTT modules (Learning Styles, Observational Skills, Giving Feedback, Communication Skills: The Angry Patient, Case-Based Teaching, Clinical Reasoning, Effective Presentations) to faculty trainers. In phase 3, specific modules were chosen and customized by the faculty trainers, and implemented for their residents. Evaluations from residents and faculty were collected throughout this process.
Results
A total of 45 faculty trainers representing 27 residency programs participated in the TTT program, and 97% of trainers were confident in their ability to implement sessions for their residents. A total of 20 trainers from 11 residency programs implemented 33 modules to train 479 residents, and 97% of residents believed they would be able to apply the skills learned. Residents' comments revealed appreciation of discussion of their roles as teachers.
Conclusion
Use of an internal TTT program can be a strategy for dissemination of resident educator and life-long learner curricula in a large academic tertiary care center. The TTT model may be useful to other large academic centers.
doi:10.4300/JGME-03-03-33
PMCID: PMC3179234  PMID: 22942958
4.  A nomogram to predict the probability of passing the American Board of Internal Medicine examination 
Medical Education Online  2012;17:10.3402/meo.v17i0.18810.
Background
Although the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification is valued as a reflection of physicians’ experience, education, and expertise, limited methods exist to predict performance in the examination.
Purpose
The objective of this study was to develop and validate a predictive tool based on variables common to all residency programs, regarding the probability of an internal medicine graduate passing the ABIM certification examination.
Methods
The development cohort was obtained from the files of the Cleveland Clinic internal medicine residents who began training between 2004 and 2008. A multivariable logistic regression model was built to predict the ABIM passing rate. The model was represented as a nomogram, which was internally validated with bootstrap resamples. The external validation was done retrospectively on a cohort of residents who graduated from two other independent internal medicine residency programs between 2007 and 2011.
Results
Of the 194 Cleveland Clinic graduates used for the nomogram development, 175 (90.2%) successfully passed the ABIM certification examination. The final nomogram included four predictors: In-Training Examination (ITE) scores in postgraduate year (PGY) 1, 2, and 3, and the number of months of overnight calls in the last 6 months of residency. The nomogram achieved a concordance index (CI) of 0.98 after correcting for over-fitting bias and allowed for the determination of an estimated probability of passing the ABIM exam. Of the 126 graduates from two other residency programs used for external validation, 116 (92.1%) passed the ABIM examination. The nomogram CI in the external validation cohort was 0.94, suggesting outstanding discrimination.
Conclusions
A simple user-friendly predictive tool, based on readily available data, was developed to predict the probability of passing the ABIM exam for internal medicine residents. This may guide program directors’ decision-making related to program curriculum and advice given to individual residents regarding board preparation.
doi:10.3402/meo.v17i0.18810
PMCID: PMC3475012  PMID: 23078794
board examination; in-training examination; internal medicine; residents; program directors
5.  The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation 
Pereyra, Florencia | Jia, Xiaoming | McLaren, Paul J. | Telenti, Amalio | de Bakker, Paul I.W. | Walker, Bruce D. | Jia, Xiaoming | McLaren, Paul J. | Ripke, Stephan | Brumme, Chanson J. | Pulit, Sara L. | Telenti, Amalio | Carrington, Mary | Kadie, Carl M. | Carlson, Jonathan M. | Heckerman, David | de Bakker, Paul I.W. | Pereyra, Florencia | de Bakker, Paul I.W. | Graham, Robert R. | Plenge, Robert M. | Deeks, Steven G. | Walker, Bruce D. | Gianniny, Lauren | Crawford, Gabriel | Sullivan, Jordan | Gonzalez, Elena | Davies, Leela | Camargo, Amy | Moore, Jamie M. | Beattie, Nicole | Gupta, Supriya | Crenshaw, Andrew | Burtt, Noël P. | Guiducci, Candace | Gupta, Namrata | Carrington, Mary | Gao, Xiaojiang | Qi, Ying | Yuki, Yuko | Pereyra, Florencia | Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja | Cutrell, Emily | Rosenberg, Rachel | Moss, Kristin L. | Lemay, Paul | O’Leary, Jessica | Schaefer, Todd | Verma, Pranshu | Toth, Ildiko | Block, Brian | Baker, Brett | Rothchild, Alissa | Lian, Jeffrey | Proudfoot, Jacqueline | Alvino, Donna Marie L. | Vine, Seanna | Addo, Marylyn M. | Allen, Todd M. | Altfeld, Marcus | Henn, Matthew R. | Le Gall, Sylvie | Streeck, Hendrik | Walker, Bruce D. | Haas, David W. | Kuritzkes, Daniel R. | Robbins, Gregory K. | Shafer, Robert W. | Gulick, Roy M. | Shikuma, Cecilia M. | Haubrich, Richard | Riddler, Sharon | Sax, Paul E. | Daar, Eric S. | Ribaudo, Heather J. | Agan, Brian | Agarwal, Shanu | Ahern, Richard L. | Allen, Brady L. | Altidor, Sherly | Altschuler, Eric L. | Ambardar, Sujata | Anastos, Kathryn | Anderson, Ben | Anderson, Val | Andrady, Ushan | Antoniskis, Diana | Bangsberg, David | Barbaro, Daniel | Barrie, William | Bartczak, J. | Barton, Simon | Basden, Patricia | Basgoz, Nesli | Bazner, Suzane | Bellos, Nicholaos C. | Benson, Anne M. | Berger, Judith | Bernard, Nicole F. | Bernard, Annette M. | Birch, Christopher | Bodner, Stanley J. | Bolan, Robert K. | Boudreaux, Emilie T. | Bradley, Meg | Braun, James F. | Brndjar, Jon E. | Brown, Stephen J. | Brown, Katherine | Brown, Sheldon T. | Burack, Jedidiah | Bush, Larry M. | Cafaro, Virginia | Campbell, Omobolaji | Campbell, John | Carlson, Robert H. | Carmichael, J. Kevin | Casey, Kathleen K. | Cavacuiti, Chris | Celestin, Gregory | Chambers, Steven T. | Chez, Nancy | Chirch, Lisa M. | Cimoch, Paul J. | Cohen, Daniel | Cohn, Lillian E. | Conway, Brian | Cooper, David A. | Cornelson, Brian | Cox, David T. | Cristofano, Michael V. | Cuchural, George | Czartoski, Julie L. | Dahman, Joseph M. | Daly, Jennifer S. | Davis, Benjamin T. | Davis, Kristine | Davod, Sheila M. | Deeks, Steven G. | DeJesus, Edwin | Dietz, Craig A. | Dunham, Eleanor | Dunn, Michael E. | Ellerin, Todd B. | Eron, Joseph J. | Fangman, John J.W. | Farel, Claire E. | Ferlazzo, Helen | Fidler, Sarah | Fleenor-Ford, Anita | Frankel, Renee | Freedberg, Kenneth A. | French, Neel K. | Fuchs, Jonathan D. | Fuller, Jon D. | Gaberman, Jonna | Gallant, Joel E. | Gandhi, Rajesh T. | Garcia, Efrain | Garmon, Donald | Gathe, Joseph C. | Gaultier, Cyril R. | Gebre, Wondwoosen | Gilman, Frank D. | Gilson, Ian | Goepfert, Paul A. | Gottlieb, Michael S. | Goulston, Claudia | Groger, Richard K. | Gurley, T. Douglas | Haber, Stuart | Hardwicke, Robin | Hardy, W. David | Harrigan, P. Richard | Hawkins, Trevor N. | Heath, Sonya | Hecht, Frederick M. | Henry, W. Keith | Hladek, Melissa | Hoffman, Robert P. | Horton, James M. | Hsu, Ricky K. | Huhn, Gregory D. | Hunt, Peter | Hupert, Mark J. | Illeman, Mark L. | Jaeger, Hans | Jellinger, Robert M. | John, Mina | Johnson, Jennifer A. | Johnson, Kristin L. | Johnson, Heather | Johnson, Kay | Joly, Jennifer | Jordan, Wilbert C. | Kauffman, Carol A. | Khanlou, Homayoon | Killian, Robert K. | Kim, Arthur Y. | Kim, David D. | Kinder, Clifford A. | Kirchner, Jeffrey T. | Kogelman, Laura | Kojic, Erna Milunka | Korthuis, P. Todd | Kurisu, Wayne | Kwon, Douglas S. | LaMar, Melissa | Lampiris, Harry | Lanzafame, Massimiliano | Lederman, Michael M. | Lee, David M. | Lee, Jean M.L. | Lee, Marah J. | Lee, Edward T.Y. | Lemoine, Janice | Levy, Jay A. | Llibre, Josep M. | Liguori, Michael A. | Little, Susan J. | Liu, Anne Y. | Lopez, Alvaro J. | Loutfy, Mono R. | Loy, Dawn | Mohammed, Debbie Y. | Man, Alan | Mansour, Michael K. | Marconi, Vincent C. | Markowitz, Martin | Marques, Rui | Martin, Jeffrey N. | Martin, Harold L. | Mayer, Kenneth Hugh | McElrath, M. Juliana | McGhee, Theresa A. | McGovern, Barbara H. | McGowan, Katherine | McIntyre, Dawn | Mcleod, Gavin X. | Menezes, Prema | Mesa, Greg | Metroka, Craig E. | Meyer-Olson, Dirk | Miller, Andy O. | Montgomery, Kate | Mounzer, Karam C. | Nagami, Ellen H. | Nagin, Iris | Nahass, Ronald G. | Nelson, Margret O. | Nielsen, Craig | Norene, David L. | O’Connor, David H. | Ojikutu, Bisola O. | Okulicz, Jason | Oladehin, Olakunle O. | Oldfield, Edward C. | Olender, Susan A. | Ostrowski, Mario | Owen, William F. | Pae, Eunice | Parsonnet, Jeffrey | Pavlatos, Andrew M. | Perlmutter, Aaron M. | Pierce, Michael N. | Pincus, Jonathan M. | Pisani, Leandro | Price, Lawrence Jay | Proia, Laurie | Prokesch, Richard C. | Pujet, Heather Calderon | Ramgopal, Moti | Rathod, Almas | Rausch, Michael | Ravishankar, J. | Rhame, Frank S. | Richards, Constance Shamuyarira | Richman, Douglas D. | Robbins, Gregory K. | Rodes, Berta | Rodriguez, Milagros | Rose, Richard C. | Rosenberg, Eric S. | Rosenthal, Daniel | Ross, Polly E. | Rubin, David S. | Rumbaugh, Elease | Saenz, Luis | Salvaggio, Michelle R. | Sanchez, William C. | Sanjana, Veeraf M. | Santiago, Steven | Schmidt, Wolfgang | Schuitemaker, Hanneke | Sestak, Philip M. | Shalit, Peter | Shay, William | Shirvani, Vivian N. | Silebi, Vanessa I. | Sizemore, James M. | Skolnik, Paul R. | Sokol-Anderson, Marcia | Sosman, James M. | Stabile, Paul | Stapleton, Jack T. | Starrett, Sheree | Stein, Francine | Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen | Sterman, F. Lisa | Stone, Valerie E. | Stone, David R. | Tambussi, Giuseppe | Taplitz, Randy A. | Tedaldi, Ellen M. | Telenti, Amalio | Theisen, William | Torres, Richard | Tosiello, Lorraine | Tremblay, Cecile | Tribble, Marc A. | Trinh, Phuong D. | Tsao, Alice | Ueda, Peggy | Vaccaro, Anthony | Valadas, Emilia | Vanig, Thanes J. | Vecino, Isabel | Vega, Vilma M. | Veikley, Wenoah | Wade, Barbara H. | Walworth, Charles | Wanidworanun, Chingchai | Ward, Douglas J. | Warner, Daniel A. | Weber, Robert D. | Webster, Duncan | Weis, Steve | Wheeler, David A. | White, David J. | Wilkins, Ed | Winston, Alan | Wlodaver, Clifford G. | Wout, Angelique van’t | Wright, David P. | Yang, Otto O. | Yurdin, David L. | Zabukovic, Brandon W. | Zachary, Kimon C. | Zeeman, Beth | Zhao, Meng
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2010;330(6010):1551-1557.
Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA–viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.
doi:10.1126/science.1195271
PMCID: PMC3235490  PMID: 21051598
6.  Eosinophilic myocarditis mimicking acute coronary syndrome secondary to idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome: a case report 
Introduction
Eosinophilic myocarditis is a rare form of myocarditis. It is characterized pathologically by diffuse or focal myocardial inflammation with eosinophilic infiltration, often in association with peripheral blood eosinophilia. We report a case of eosinophilic myocarditis secondary to hypereosinophilic syndrome.
Case presentation
A 74-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of asthma, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, stroke and coronary artery disease presented to the emergency department of our hospital with chest pain. Evaluations revealed that she had peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated cardiac enzymes. Electrocardiographic findings were nonspecific. Her electrocardiographic finding and elevated cardiac enzymes pointed to a non-ST-elevated myocardial infarction. Echocardiogram showed a severe decrease in the left ventricular systolic function. Coronary angiogram showed nonobstructive coronary artery disease. She then underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, which showed neither infiltrative myocardial diseases nor any evidence of infarction. This was followed by an endomyocardial biopsy which was consistent with eosinophilic myocarditis. Hematologic workup regarding her eosinophilia was consistent with hypereosinophilic syndrome. After being started on steroid therapy, her peripheral eosinophilia resolved and her symptoms improved. Her left ventricular ejection fraction, however, did not improve.
Conclusion
Eosinophilic myocarditis can present like an acute myocardial infarction and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in patients with a history of allergy, asthma or acute reduction of the left ventricular function with or without peripheral eosinophilia.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-4-40
PMCID: PMC2830978  PMID: 20181108

Results 1-6 (6)