PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-6 (6)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  A Modified TALEN-Based Strategy for Rapidly and Efficiently Generating Knockout Mice for Kidney Development Studies 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(1):e84893.
The transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) strategy has been widely used to delete and mutate genes in vitro. This strategy has begun to be used for in vivo systemic gene manipulation, but not in an organ-specific manner. In this study, we developed a modified, highly efficient TALEN strategy using a dual-fluorescence reporter. We used this modified strategy and, within 5 weeks, we successfully generated kidney proximal tubule-specific gene Ttc36 homozygous knockout mice. Unilateral nephrectomy was performed on the 6-week-old founders (F0) to identify the knockout genotype prior to the birth of the offspring. This strategy was found to have little effect on reproduction in the knockout mice and inheritability of the knockout genotypes. The modified TALEN knockout strategy in combination with unilateral nephrectomy can be readily used for studies of gene function in kidney development and diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0084893
PMCID: PMC3885652  PMID: 24416307
2.  Increased JNK1 Signaling Pathway Is Responsible for ABCG2-Mediated Multidrug Resistance in Human Colon Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(8):e41763.
Multidrug resistance remains a major obstacle to effective chemotherapy of colon cancer. ABCG2, as a half-transporter of the G subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporter genes (ABC transporters), is known to play a crucial role in multidrug resistance. However, the molecular mechanism of controlling ABCG2 expression in drug resistance of colon cancer is unclear and scarcely reported. In the present study, we systematically investigate the potential role of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal pathway in ABCG2-induced multidrug resistance in colon cancer. In the hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) resistant cell line SW1116/HCPT from human colon cancer cell line SW1116, ABCG2 is the major factor for multidrug resistance, other than well-studied ABCB1 or ABCC1. Our findings indicate that blocking the JNK pathway by pathway inhibitor SP600125 reduces the expression level and transport function of ABCG2 in drug-resistant cells SW116/HCPT. Notably, the experiments of small interfering RNA directed against JNK1 and JNK2 show that only silence of JNK1 gene has the equal effect as SP600125 on dephosphorylation of transcription factor c-Jun and the expression of ABCG2 protein, while the corresponding phenomena were not observed after silence of JNK2 gene. Meanwhile, SP600125 induces the apoptosis of SW116/HCPT cells by promoting the cleavage of PARP and suppressing the anti-apoptotic protein survivin and bcl-2, and increases the sensitivity of SW1116/HCPT to HCPT. Taken together, our work demonstrated that JNK1/c-jun signaling pathway was involved in ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance in colon cancer cells. Definitely, inhibition of the JNK1/c-jun pathway is useful for reversing ABCG2-mediated drug resistance in HCPT-resistant colon cancer cells.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041763
PMCID: PMC3411563  PMID: 22870247
3.  Differences in iNOS and Arginase Expression and Activity in the Macrophages of Rats Are Responsible for the Resistance against T. gondii Infection 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(4):e35834.
Toxoplasma gondii infects humans and warm blooded animals causing devastating disease worldwide. It has long been a mystery as to why the peritoneal macrophages of rats are naturally resistant to T. gondii infection while those of mice are not. Here, we report that high expression levels and activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and low levels of arginase-1 (Arg 1) activity in the peritoneal macrophages of rats are responsible for their resistance against T. gondii infection, due to high nitric oxide and low polyamines within these cells. The opposite situation was observed in the peritoneal macrophages of mice. This discovery of the opposing functions of iNOS and Arg 1 in rodent peritoneal macrophages may lead to a better understanding of the resistance mechanisms of mammals, particularly humans and livestock, against T. gondii and other intracellular pathogens.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0035834
PMCID: PMC3338469  PMID: 22558235
4.  Preparation and characterization of realgar nanoparticles and their inhibitory effect on rat glioma cells 
Aim
Our objective was to prepare a new nano-sized realgar particle and characterize its anti-tumor effect on tumor cells.
Methods
Nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation and were detected by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and dynamic light scattering. An anti-proliferative effect of realgar nanoparticles on rat glioma (C6) cells was determined by the MTT assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis rates were observed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis-related gene expression was detected by immunofluorescence staining.
Results
Realgar nanoparticles were successfully prepared. The particles were spherical, with an average diameter of approximately 80 nm, and contained arsenic and sulfur elements. Realgar nanoparticles inhibited C6 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of C6 cells with realgar nanoparticles significantly increased the proportions of cells in S and G2/M phases, decreased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase, downregulated Bcl-2 expression, and substantially upregulated Bax expression.
Conclusion
Realgar nanoparticles significantly inhibited C6 glioma cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis by inducing the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 expression. Realgar nanoparticles are a promising in vitro anti-cancer strategy and may be applicable for human cancer therapy studies.
doi:10.2147/IJN.S26237
PMCID: PMC3254263  PMID: 22238507
realgar; preparation; characterization; inhibitory effect
5.  Fluorescence Modified Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for High-Efficient Cellular Imaging 
Nanoscale Research Letters  2009;4(4):287-295.
Labeling of cells with nanoparticles for living detection is of interest to various biomedical applications. In this study, novel fluorescent/magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and used in high-efficient cellular imaging. The nanoparticles coated with the modified chitosan possessed a magnetic oxide core and a covalently attached fluorescent dye. We evaluated the feasibility and efficiency in labeling cancer cells (SMMC-7721) with the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles exhibited a high affinity to cells, which was demonstrated by flow cytometry and magnetic resonance imaging. The results showed that cell-labeling efficiency of the nanoparticles was dependent on the incubation time and nanoparticles’ concentration. The minimum detected number of labeled cells was around 104 by using a clinical 1.5-T MRI imager. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy instruments were used to monitor the localization patterns of the magnetic nanoparticles in cells. These new magneto-fluorescent nanoagents have demonstrated the potential for future medical use.
doi:10.1007/s11671-008-9239-9
PMCID: PMC2893437  PMID: 20596545
Magnetic nanoparticle; Fluorescence; Chitosan; Magnetic resonance imaging
6.  Fluorescence Modified Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for High-Efficient Cellular Imaging 
Nanoscale Research Letters  2009;4(4):287-295.
Labeling of cells with nanoparticles for living detection is of interest to various biomedical applications. In this study, novel fluorescent/magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and used in high-efficient cellular imaging. The nanoparticles coated with the modified chitosan possessed a magnetic oxide core and a covalently attached fluorescent dye. We evaluated the feasibility and efficiency in labeling cancer cells (SMMC-7721) with the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles exhibited a high affinity to cells, which was demonstrated by flow cytometry and magnetic resonance imaging. The results showed that cell-labeling efficiency of the nanoparticles was dependent on the incubation time and nanoparticles’ concentration. The minimum detected number of labeled cells was around 104by using a clinical 1.5-T MRI imager. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy instruments were used to monitor the localization patterns of the magnetic nanoparticles in cells. These new magneto-fluorescent nanoagents have demonstrated the potential for future medical use.
doi:10.1007/s11671-008-9239-9
PMCID: PMC2893437  PMID: 20596545
Magnetic nanoparticle; Fluorescence; Chitosan; Magnetic resonance imaging

Results 1-6 (6)