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1.  Relationship between job stress and self-rated health among Japanese full-time occupational physicians 
Objective
We investigated relationship between job stress and self-rated health among Japanese nese full-time occupational physicians (OPs).
Methods
In 2000, we mailed self-administrated questionnaires to 716 OPs. Of these OPs, 349 (49%) returned sufficiently completed questionnaires for analyses. oblique-rotated principal factor analysis of the job stress questionnaire extracted three components; low understanding of occupational health services in companies (low understanding), conflicts between occupational physicians and their coworkers (conflicts), and discrepancies between occupational physicians’ routine work and occupational health services (discrepancies).
Results
The model, in which low understanding contributed to self-rated health through job satisfaction and self-rated health was influenced by job satisfaction and discrepancies, provided a good fit to the data.
Conclusions
We found that a potential relationship between job stress and self-rated health among Japanese full-time OPs. The present results implied that among full-time OPs, low understanding contributed negatively to self-rated health through job satisfaction, and that self-rated health was influenced positively by job satisfaction and negatively by discrepancies.
doi:10.1007/BF02897695
PMCID: PMC2723404  PMID: 21432124
job stress; job satisfaction; self-rated health; occupational physicians; structural equation model
2.  Relationship between coping skills and job satisfaction among Japanese full-time occupational physicians 
Objective
The present study investigated the relationship between coping skills and job satisfaction among Japanese full-time occupational physicians (OPs).
Methods
In 2000 we mailed self-administered questionnaires to 716 full-time OPs who were members of “Sanyu-kai”, the only Japanese association of full-time OPs. The questionnaires included age, gender, marital status, main type of company’s work, the number of full-time OPs, the number of employees, working years as an OP, tenure in the present company, job stress, and coping skills question. The coping skills questions consisted of 11 items which were decided after discussion among several experienced full-time OPs. In total, 351 (49%) of the OPs returned suitable questionnaires for analyses.
Results
Considering age, gender, marital status, and coping skills, multiple regression analysis (stepwise method) found that age, simplification of work, obvious roles for staff, consultations, and communication in the community and company were factors which contributed significantly to job satisfaction. Structural equation modeling showed that age and coping skills such as work system improvements, consultations, and communication in the community and company influenced job satisfaction.
Discussion
Our results indicated that the age and coping skills influenced job satisfaction among full-time OPs. Our results are also considered to support the training of OPs in the future.
doi:10.1007/BF02897915
PMCID: PMC2723387  PMID: 21432099
full-time occupational physician; coping skills; job satisfaction; multiple regression analysis; structural equation modeling

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