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1.  Use of a High Resolution Melting Assay to Analyze HIV Diversity in HIV-infected Ugandan Children 
BACKGROUND
We used a novel high resolution melting (HRM) diversity assay to analyze HIV diversity in Ugandan children (ages 0.6 to 12.4 years) who were enrolled in an observational study of antiretroviral treatment (ART). Children were maintained on ART if they were clinically and immunologically stable.
METHODS
HIV diversity was measured prior to ART (baseline) in 76 children and after 48 or 96 weeks of ART in 14 children who were not virally suppressed. HIV diversity (expressed as HRM scores) was measured in six regions of the HIV genome (two in gag, one in pol, three in env).
RESULTS
Higher baseline HRM scores were significantly associated with older age (≥ 2 years, P ≤ 0.001 for all six regions). HRM scores from different regions were weakly correlated. Higher baseline HRM scores in three regions (one in gag, two in env) were associated with ART failure. HIV diversity was lower in four regions (two in gag, one in pol, one in env) after 48 to 96 weeks of non-suppressive ART compared to baseline.
CONCLUSIONS
Higher levels of HIV diversity were observed in older children prior to ART and higher levels of diversity in some regions of the HIV genome were associated with ART failure. Prolonged exposure to non-suppressive ART was associated with a significant decrease in viral diversity in selected regions of the HIV genome.
doi:10.1097/INF.0b013e3182678c3f
PMCID: PMC3473149  PMID: 22785048
HIV; diversity; children; antiretroviral therapy
2.  Analysis of Drug Resistance in Children Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy for Treatment of HIV-1 Infection in Uganda 
Abstract
We analyzed drug resistance in HIV-infected Ugandan children who received antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, observational study (2004–2006); some children had prior single-dose nevirapine (sdNVP) exposure. Children received stavudine (d4T), lamivudine (3TC), and nevirapine (NVP); treatment was continued if they were clinically and immunologically stable. Samples with >1,000 copies/ml HIV RNA were analyzed by using the ViroSeq HIV Genotyping System (ViroSeq). Subtype A and D pretreatment samples also were analyzed with the LigAmp assay (for K103N, Y181C, and G190A). ViroSeq results were obtained for 74 pretreatment samples (35 from sdNVP-exposed children (median age, 19 months) and 39 from sdNVP-unexposed children (median age, 84 months). This included 39 subtype A, 22 subtype D, 1 subtype C, and 12 inter-subtype recombinant samples. One sample had nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance, one had nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) resistance, and three had protease inhibitor (PI) resistance. Y181C was detected by using LigAmp in five pretreatment samples [four (14.8%) of 37 samples from sdNVP-exposed children, one (4.2%) of 24 samples from children without prior sdNVP exposure; p = 0.35]. Among children who were not virally suppressed at 48 weeks of treatment, all 12 tested had NNRTI resistance, as well as resistance to 3TC and emtricitibine (FTC); three had resistance to other NRTIs. Seven of those children had a ViroSeq result at 96 weeks of treatment; four of the seven acquired resistance to additional NRTIs by 96 weeks. In Uganda, clinically and immunologically stable children receiving nonsuppressive antiretroviral treatment regimens are at risk for development of drug resistance.
doi:10.1089/aid.2009.0164
PMCID: PMC2875950  PMID: 20455758

Results 1-2 (2)