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1.  Vaccine-Induced IgG Antibodies to V1V2 Regions of Multiple HIV-1 Subtypes Correlate with Decreased Risk of HIV-1 Infection 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(2):e87572.
In the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, IgG antibody (Ab) binding levels to variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 were an inverse correlate of risk of HIV-1 infection. To determine if V1V2-specific Abs cross-react with V1V2 from different HIV-1 subtypes, if the nature of the V1V2 antigen used to asses cross-reactivity influenced infection risk, and to identify immune assays for upcoming HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials, new V1V2-scaffold antigens were designed and tested. Protein scaffold antigens carrying the V1V2 regions from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C, D or CRF01_AE were assayed in pilot studies, and six were selected to assess cross-reactive Abs in the plasma from the original RV144 case-control cohort (41 infected vaccinees, 205 frequency-matched uninfected vaccinees, and 40 placebo recipients) using ELISA and a binding Ab multiplex assay. IgG levels to these antigens were assessed as correlates of risk in vaccine recipients using weighted logistic regression models. Levels of Abs reactive with subtype A, B, C and CRF01_AE V1V2-scaffold antigens were all significant inverse correlates of risk (p-values of 0.0008–0.05; estimated odds ratios of 0.53–0.68 per 1 standard deviation increase). Thus, levels of vaccine-induced IgG Abs recognizing V1V2 regions from multiple HIV-1 subtypes, and presented on different scaffolds, constitute inverse correlates of risk for HIV-1 infection in the RV144 vaccine trial. The V1V2 antigens provide a link between RV144 and upcoming HIV-1 vaccine trials, and identify reagents and methods for evaluating V1V2 Abs as possible correlates of protection against HIV-1 infection.
Trial Registration
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00223080
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087572
PMCID: PMC3913641  PMID: 24504509
2.  Analysis of V2 Antibody Responses Induced in Vaccinees in the ALVAC/AIDSVAX HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy Trial 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(1):e53629.
The RV144 clinical trial of a prime/boost immunizing regimen using recombinant canary pox (ALVAC-HIV) and two gp120 proteins (AIDSVAX B and E) was previously shown to have a 31.2% efficacy rate. Plasma specimens from vaccine and placebo recipients were used in an extensive set of assays to identify correlates of HIV-1 infection risk. Of six primary variables that were studied, only one displayed a significant inverse correlation with risk of infection: the antibody (Ab) response to a fusion protein containing the V1 and V2 regions of gp120 (gp70-V1V2). This finding prompted a thorough examination of the results generated with the complete panel of 13 assays measuring various V2 Abs in the stored plasma used in the initial pilot studies and those used in the subsequent case-control study. The studies revealed that the ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX vaccine induced V2-specific Abs that cross-react with multiple HIV-1 subgroups and recognize both conformational and linear epitopes. The conformational epitope was present on gp70-V1V2, while the predominant linear V2 epitope mapped to residues 165–178, immediately N-terminal to the putative α4β7 binding motif in the mid-loop region of V2. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to compare the risk of infection with data from 12 V2 assays, and in 11 of these, the ORs were ≤1, reaching statistical significance for two of the variables: Ab responses to gp70-V1V2 and to overlapping V2 linear peptides. It remains to be determined whether anti-V2 Ab responses were directly responsible for the reduced infection rate in RV144 and whether anti-V2 Abs will prove to be important with other candidate HIV vaccines that show efficacy, however, the results support continued dissection of Ab responses to the V2 region which may illuminate mechanisms of protection from HIV-1 infection and may facilitate the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053629
PMCID: PMC3547933  PMID: 23349725
3.  Contrasting Two Frameworks for ROC Analysis of Ordinal Ratings 
Background
Statistical evaluation of medical imaging tests used for diagnostic and prognostic purposes often employ receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Two methods for ROC analysis are popular. The ordinal regression method is the standard approach used when evaluating tests with ordinal values. The direct ROC modeling method is a more recently developed approach that has been motivated by applications to tests with continuous values, such as biomarkers.
Objective
In this paper, we compare the methods in terms of model formulations, interpretations of estimated parameters, the ranges of scientific questions that can be addressed with them, their computational algorithms and the efficiencies with which they use data.
Results
We show that a strong relationship exists between the methods by demonstrating that they fit the same models when only a single test is evaluated. The ordinal regression models are typically alternative parameterizations of the direct ROC models and vice-versa. The direct method has two major advantages over the ordinal regression method: (i) estimated parameters relate directly to ROC curves. This facilitates interpretations of covariate effects on ROC performance; and (ii) comparisons between tests can be done directly in this framework. Comparisons can be made while accommodating covariate effects and comparisons can be made even between tests that have values on different scales, such as between a continuous biomarker test and an ordinal valued imaging test. The ordinal regression method provides slightly more precise parameter estimates from data in our simulated data models.
Conclusion
While the ordinal regression method is slightly more efficient, the direct ROC modeling method has important advantages in regards to interpretation and it offers a framework to address a broader range of scientific questions including the facility to compare tests.
doi:10.1177/0272989X09357477
PMCID: PMC2905510  PMID: 20147599
comparisons; covariates; diagnostic test; markers; ordinal regression; percentile values
4.  The Potential of Genes and other Markers to Inform about Risk 
Background
Advances in biotechnology have raised expectations that biomarkers, including genetic profiles, will yield information to accurately predict outcomes for individuals. However, results to date have been disappointing. In addition, statistical methods to quantify the predictive information in markers have not been standardized.
Methods
We discuss statistical techniques to summarize predictive information including risk distribution curves and measures derived from them that relate to decision making. Attributes of these measures are contrasted with alternatives such as receiver operating characteristic curves, R-squared, percent reclassification and net reclassification index. Data are generated from simple models of risk conferred by genetic profiles for individuals in a population. Statistical techniques are illustrated and the risk prediction capacities of different risk models are quantified.
Results
Risk distribution curves are most informative and relevant to clinical practice. They show proportions of subjects classified into clinically relevant risk categories. In a population in which 10% have the outcome event and subjects are categorized as high risk if their risk exceeds 20%, we found to identify as high risk more than half of those destined to have an event, either 150 genes each with odds ratio of 1.5 or 250 genes each with odds ratio of 1.25 was required when the minor allele frequencies are 10%. We show that conclusions based on ROC curves may not be the same as conclusions based on risk distribution curves.
Conclusions
Many highly predictive genes will be required in order to identify substantial numbers of subjects at high risk.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0510
PMCID: PMC2836397  PMID: 20160267
biomarkers; classification; discrimination; prediction; statistical methods
5.  Evaluation of methods for oligonucleotide array data via quantitative real-time PCR 
BMC Bioinformatics  2006;7:23.
Background
There are currently many different methods for processing and summarizing probe-level data from Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. It is of great interest to validate these methods and identify those that are most effective. There is no single best way to do this validation, and a variety of approaches is needed. Moreover, gene expression data are collected to answer a variety of scientific questions, and the same method may not be best for all questions. Only a handful of validation studies have been done so far, most of which rely on spike-in datasets and focus on the question of detecting differential expression. Here we seek methods that excel at estimating relative expression. We evaluate methods by identifying those that give the strongest linear association between expression measurements by array and the "gold-standard" assay.
Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is generally considered the "gold-standard" assay for measuring gene expression by biologists and is often used to confirm findings from microarray data. Here we use qRT-PCR measurements to validate methods for the components of processing oligo array data: background adjustment, normalization, mismatch adjustment, and probeset summary. An advantage of our approach over spike-in studies is that methods are validated on a real dataset that was collected to address a scientific question.
Results
We initially identify three of six popular methods that consistently produced the best agreement between oligo array and RT-PCR data for medium- and high-intensity genes. The three methods are generally known as MAS5, gcRMA, and the dChip mismatch mode. For medium- and high-intensity genes, we identified use of data from mismatch probes (as in MAS5 and dChip mismatch) and a sequence-based method of background adjustment (as in gcRMA) as the most important factors in methods' performances. However, we found poor reliability for methods using mismatch probes for low-intensity genes, which is in agreement with previous studies.
Conclusion
We advocate use of sequence-based background adjustment in lieu of mismatch adjustment to achieve the best results across the intensity spectrum. No method of normalization or probeset summary showed any consistent advantages.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-7-23
PMCID: PMC1360686  PMID: 16417622

Results 1-5 (5)