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1.  Association of High Pulse Pressure With Proteinuria in Subjects With Diabetes, Prediabetes, or Normal Glucose Tolerance in a Large Japanese General Population Sample 
Diabetes Care  2012;35(6):1310-1315.
OBJECTIVE
To examine whether there is a difference in the association between high pulse pressure and proteinuria, independent of other blood pressure (BP) indices, such as systolic or diastolic BP, among subjects with diabetes, prediabetes, or normal glucose tolerance.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Using a nationwide health checkup database of 228,778 Japanese aged ≥20 years (mean 63.2 years; 39.3% men; none had pre-existing cardiovascular disease), we examined the association between high pulse pressure, defined as the highest quintile of pulse pressure (≥63 mmHg, n = 40,511), and proteinuria (≥1+ on dipstick, n = 12,090) separately in subjects with diabetes (n = 27,913), prediabetes (n = 100,214), and normal glucose tolerance (n = 100,651).
RESULTS
The prevalence of proteinuria was different among subjects with diabetes, prediabetes, and normal glucose tolerance (11.3 vs. 5.0 vs. 3.9%, respectively; P < 0.001). In subjects with diabetes, but not those with prediabetes or normal glucose tolerance, high pulse pressure was associated with proteinuria independently of significant covariates, including systolic BP (odds ratio 1.15 [95% CI 1.04–1.28]) or diastolic or mean BP (all P < 0.01). In patients with diabetes, a +1 SD increase of pulse pressure (+13 mmHg) was associated with proteinuria, even after adjustment for systolic BP (1.07 [1.00–1.13]) or diastolic or mean BP (all P < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS
Among the Japanese general population, there was a significant difference in the association between high pulse pressure and proteinuria among subjects with diabetes, prediabetes, and normal glucose tolerance. Only in diabetes was high pulse pressure associated with proteinuria independent of systolic, diastolic, or mean BP levels.
doi:10.2337/dc11-2245
PMCID: PMC3357237  PMID: 22474041
2.  Cost-effectiveness of chronic kidney disease mass screening test in Japan 
Background
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem. Strategy for its early detection is still controversial. This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of population strategy, i.e. mass screening, and Japan’s health checkup reform.
Methods
Cost-effectiveness analysis was carried out to compare test modalities in the context of reforming Japan’s mandatory annual health checkup for adults. A decision tree and Markov model with societal perspective were constructed to compare dipstick test to check proteinuria only, serum creatinine (Cr) assay only, or both.
Results
Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of mass screening compared with do-nothing were calculated as ¥1,139,399/QALY (US $12,660/QALY) for dipstick test only, ¥8,122,492/QALY (US $90,250/QALY) for serum Cr assay only and ¥8,235,431/QALY (US $91,505/QALY) for both. ICERs associated with the reform were calculated as ¥9,325,663/QALY (US $103,618/QALY) for mandating serum Cr assay in addition to the currently used mandatory dipstick test, and ¥9,001,414/QALY (US $100,016/QALY) for mandating serum Cr assay and applying dipstick test at discretion.
Conclusions
Taking a threshold to judge cost-effectiveness according to World Health Organization’s recommendation, i.e. three times gross domestic product per capita of ¥11.5 million/QALY (US $128 thousand/QALY), a policy that mandates serum Cr assay is cost-effective. The choice of continuing the current policy which mandates dipstick test only is also cost-effective. Our results suggest that a population strategy for CKD detection such as mass screening using dipstick test and/or serum Cr assay can be justified as an efficient use of health care resources in a population with high prevalence of the disease such as in Japan and Asian countries.
doi:10.1007/s10157-011-0567-1
PMCID: PMC3328680  PMID: 22167460
Chronic kidney disease; Cost-effectiveness; Dipstick test; Mass screening; Proteinuria; Serum creatinine
3.  Abdominal obesity exhibits distinct effect on inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins in apparently healthy Japanese men 
Background
Since visceral fat tissue is known to release various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, abdominal obesity may play a key role in the inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, few studies have determined precise relationships of abdominal obesity with inflammatory markers in MetS. To clarify the importance of abdominal obesity in sub-clinical inflammation, we examined the changes of inflammatory markers in clustering of MetS components with or without abdominal obesity.
Methods
Subjects consisted of 326 apparently healthy Japanese men (age: 30 to 59 years) who underwent health examination in the Osaka University Health Care Center. MetS components were assessed and serum levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin (IL)-6 and adiponectin were examined in all subjects.
Results
Subjects with abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥ 85 cm) showed higher serum hs-CRP and IL-6 levels and a lower adiponectin level than those without abdominal obesity. Serum levels of hs-CRP and IL-6 significantly increased in association with clustering of MetS components in the subjects with abdominal obesity, but not in those without abdominal obesity. On the other hand, serum adiponectin level exhibited a little change with clustering of MetS components in the subjects with abdominal obesity. Significant negative correlation between adiponectin and hs-CRP was observed in the subjects with abdominal obesity, however this correlation was not detected in obese subjects defined by body mass index ≥ 25.
Conclusion
Inflammatory status is not exaggerated by clustering of MetS components in the subjects without abdominal obesity. Abdominal obesity may exhibit distinct effect on inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins and modulate inflammatory network in MetS.
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-6-27
PMCID: PMC2173887  PMID: 17903275

Results 1-3 (3)