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author:("melas, Arthur")
1.  Risk for Myasthenia Gravis maps to 151Pro→ Ala change in TNIP1 and to HLA-B*08 
Annals of neurology  2012;72(6):927-935.
Objective
The objective of this study is to comprehensively define the genetic basis of Early Onset Myasthenia Gravis.
Methods
We have carried out a two-stage genome-wide association study on a total of 649 North European EOMG patients. Cases were matched 1:4 with controls of European ancestry. We performed imputation and conditional analyses across the major histocompatibility complex, as well as in the top regions of association outside the HLA region.
Results
We observed the strongest association in the HLA class I region at rs7750641 (p = 1.2 × 10−92, OR = 6.25). By imputation and conditional analyses, HLA-B*08 proves to be the major associated allele (p = 2.87 × 10−113, OR = 6.41). In addition to the expected association with PTPN22 (rs2476601, OR =1.71, p = 8.2 ×10−10), an imputed coding variant (rs2233290) at position 151 (Pro→Ala) in the TNFAIP3-interacting protein 1, TNIP1, confers even stronger risk than PTPN22 (OR = 1.91, p = 3.2 × 10−10).
Interpretation
The association at TNIP1 in EOMG implies disease mechanisms involving ubiquitin-dependent dysregulation of NF-κB signaling. The localization of the major HLA signal to the HLA-B*08 allele suggests that CD8+ T-cells may play a key role in disease initiation or pathogenesis.
doi:10.1002/ana.23691
PMCID: PMC3535539  PMID: 23055271
2.  Suppression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by interleukin-10 transduced neural stem/progenitor cells 
Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) have the ability to migrate into the central nervous system (CNS) to replace damaged cells. In inflammatory CNS disease, cytokine transduced neural stem cells may be used as vehicles to specifically reduce inflammation and promote cell replacement. In this study, we used NSPCs overexpressing IL-10, an immunomodulatory cytokine, in an animal model for CNS inflammation and multiple sclerosis (MS). Intravenous injection of IL-10 transduced neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCIL-10) suppressed myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein aa 35–55 (MOG35-55)- induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and, following intravenous injection, NSPCIL-10 migrated to peripheral lymphoid organs and into the CNS. NSPCIL-10 suppressed antigen-specific proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine production of lymph node cells obtained from MOG35-55 peptide immunized mice. In this model, IL-10 producing NSPCs act via a peripheral immunosuppressive effect to attenuate EAE.
doi:10.1186/1742-2094-10-117
PMCID: PMC3852052  PMID: 24053338
Neural stem/progenitor cells; IL-10; EAE
3.  Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Transthyretin in Lewy Body Disorders with and without Dementia 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(10):e48042.
Parkinson’s disease (PD) without (non-demented, PDND) and with dementia (PDD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are subsumed under the umbrella term Lewy body disorders (LBD). The main component of the underlying pathologic substrate, i.e. Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, is misfolded alpha-synuclein (Asyn), and - in particular in demented LBD patients - co-occurring misfolded amyloid-beta (Abeta). Lowered blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of transthyretin (TTR) - a clearance protein mainly produced in the liver and, autonomously, in the choroid plexus - are associated with Abeta accumulation in Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, a recent study suggests that TTR is involved in Asyn clearance. We measured TTR protein levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 131 LBD patients (77 PDND, 26 PDD, and 28 DLB) and 72 controls, and compared TTR levels with demographic and clinical data as well as neurodegenerative markers in the CSF. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms of the TTR gene which are considered to influence the ability of the protein to carry its ligands were also analyzed. CSF TTR levels were significantly higher in LBD patients compared to controls. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that this effect was driven by PDND patients. In addition, CSF TTR levels correlated negatively with CSF Abeta1–42, total tau and phospho-tau levels. Serum TTR levels did not significantly differ among the studied groups. There were no relevant associations between TTR levels and genetic, demographic and clinical data, respectively. These results suggest an involvement of the clearance protein TTR in LBD pathophysiology, and should motivate to elucidate TTR-related mechanisms in LBD in more detail.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0048042
PMCID: PMC3485000  PMID: 23133543
4.  Contrasting disease patterns in seropositive and seronegative neuromyelitis optica: A multicentre study of 175 patients 
Background
The diagnostic and pathophysiological relevance of antibodies to aquaporin-4 (AQP4-Ab) in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) has been intensively studied. However, little is known so far about the clinical impact of AQP4-Ab seropositivity.
Objective
To analyse systematically the clinical and paraclinical features associated with NMO spectrum disorders in Caucasians in a stratified fashion according to the patients' AQP4-Ab serostatus.
Methods
Retrospective study of 175 Caucasian patients (AQP4-Ab positive in 78.3%).
Results
Seropositive patients were found to be predominantly female (p < 0.0003), to more often have signs of co-existing autoimmunity (p < 0.00001), and to experience more severe clinical attacks. A visual acuity of ≤ 0.1 during acute optic neuritis (ON) attacks was more frequent among seropositives (p < 0.002). Similarly, motor symptoms were more common in seropositive patients, the median Medical Research Council scale (MRC) grade worse, and MRC grades ≤ 2 more frequent, in particular if patients met the 2006 revised criteria (p < 0.005, p < 0.006 and p < 0.01, respectively), the total spinal cord lesion load was higher (p < 0.006), and lesions ≥ 6 vertebral segments as well as entire spinal cord involvement more frequent (p < 0.003 and p < 0.043). By contrast, bilateral ON at onset was more common in seronegatives (p < 0.007), as was simultaneous ON and myelitis (p < 0.001); accordingly, the time to diagnosis of NMO was shorter in the seronegative group (p < 0.029). The course of disease was more often monophasic in seronegatives (p < 0.008). Seropositives and seronegatives did not differ significantly with regard to age at onset, time to relapse, annualized relapse rates, outcome from relapse (complete, partial, no recovery), annualized EDSS increase, mortality rate, supratentorial brain lesions, brainstem lesions, history of carcinoma, frequency of preceding infections, oligoclonal bands, or CSF pleocytosis. Both the time to relapse and the time to diagnosis was longer if the disease started with ON (p < 0.002 and p < 0.013). Motor symptoms or tetraparesis at first myelitis and > 1 myelitis attacks in the first year were identified as possible predictors of a worse outcome.
Conclusion
This study provides an overview of the clinical and paraclinical features of NMOSD in Caucasians and demonstrates a number of distinct disease characteristics in seropositive and seronegative patients.
doi:10.1186/1742-2094-9-14
PMCID: PMC3283476  PMID: 22260418
Neuromyelitis optica; Devic disease; Devic syndrome; longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis; recurrent optic neuritis; NMO-IgG; aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody; epidemiology; clinical features; magnetic resonance imaging; cerebrospinal fluid
5.  Cathepsin V is involved in the degradation of invariant chain in human thymus and is overexpressed in myasthenia gravis 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  2003;112(4):517-526.
Stepwise degradation of the invariant chain (Ii) is required for the binding of antigenic peptides to MHC class II molecules. Cathepsin (Cat) L in the murine thymus and Cat S in peripheral APCs have both been implicated in the last step of Ii degradation that gives rise to the class II–associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP). Cat V has been recently described as highly homologous to Cat L and exclusively expressed in human thymus and testis, but with no mouse orthologue. We report that Cat V is the dominant cysteine protease in cortical human thymic epithelial cells, while Cat L and Cat S seem to be restricted to dendritic and macrophage-like cells. Active Cat V in thymic lysosomal preparations was demonstrated by active-site labeling. Recombinant Cat V was capable of converting Ii into CLIP efficiently, suggesting that Cat V is the protease that controls the generation of αβ-CLIP complexes in the human thymus, in analogy to Cat L in mouse. Comparison of Cat V expression between thymi from patients with myasthenia gravis and healthy controls revealed a significantly higher expression level in the pathological samples, suggesting a potential involvement of this protease in the immunopathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease almost invariably associated with thymic pathology.
doi:10.1172/JCI200318028
PMCID: PMC171390  PMID: 12925692

Results 1-5 (5)