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1.  Risk Factors and Outcomes of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Bacteraemia: A Comparison with Bacteraemia Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter Species 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(11):e112208.
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (SM) is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits intrinsic resistance to various antimicrobial agents. However, the risk factors for SM bacteraemia have not been sufficiently evaluated. From January 2005 to September 2012, we retrospectively compared the clinical backgrounds and outcomes of SM bacteraemic patients (SM group) with those of bacteraemic patients due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA group) or Acinetobacter species (AC group). DNA genotyping of the SM isolates using the Diversilab system was performed to investigate the genetic relationships among the isolates. The SM, PA, and AC groups included 54, 167, and 69 patients, respectively. Nine of 17 patients in the SM group receiving trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis developed SM bacteraemia. Independent risk factors for SM bacteraemia were the use of carbapenems and antipseudomonal cephalosporins and SM isolation within 30 days prior to the onset of bacteraemia. Earlier SM isolation was observed in 32 of 48 patients (66.7%) with SM bacteraemia who underwent clinical microbiological examinations. Of these 32 patients, 15 patients (46.9%) had the same focus of bacteraemia as was found in the previous isolation site. The 30-day all-cause mortality rate among the SM group (33.3%) was higher than that of the PA group (21.5%, p = 0.080) and the AC group (17.3%, p = 0.041). The independent factor that was associated with 30-day mortality was the SOFA score. DNA genotyping of SM isolates and epidemiological data suggested that no outbreak had occurred. SM bacteraemia was associated with high mortality and should be considered in patients with recent use of broad-spectrum antibiotics or in patients with recent isolation of the organism.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112208
PMCID: PMC4223050  PMID: 25375244
2.  Detection of Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli ST131 and ST405 Clonal Groups by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry 
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  2014;52(4):1034-1040.
Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) and ST405 are important clonal groups, because they are associated with the global increase of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL) producers. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is emerging as a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate method for bacterial identification. We investigated the detection performance of MALDI-TOF for the ST131 and ST405 clonal groups using 41 ST131-O25b, 26 ST131-O16, and 41 ST405 ESBL-producing isolates and 41 ESBL-producing isolates frrom other STs. The main spectra representing each clonal group were used for classification with Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics GmbH, Bremen, Germany). The peak that had the highest area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve generated by ClinProTools (Bruker) was detected with FlexAnalysis (Bruker), and an optimal signal-to-noise ratio cutoff was determined. The optimal detection models were generated by ClinProTools. Classification by Biotyper could detect the ST131-whole (O25b and O16 together) group with a sensitivity of 98.5% and a specificity of 93.9%. With FlexAnalysis, a peak of 9,720 Da detected the ST131-whole group with a sensitivity of 97.0% and a specificity of 91.5% at a cutoff value of 8.0. The ClinProTools models exhibited good performance for the detection of the ST131-whole group (sensitivity and specificity, 94.0% and 92.7%, respectively), the ST131-O25b group (95.1% and 98.2%, respectively), and the ST405 group (90.2% and 96.3%, respectively). MALDI-TOF MS had high detection performance for the ST131-whole, ST131-O25b, and ST405 clonal groups. MALDI-TOF MS should be considered as an alternative method to monitor the epidemiology of the ESBL-producing E. coli ST131 and ST405 clonal groups.
doi:10.1128/JCM.03196-13
PMCID: PMC3993475  PMID: 24430452
3.  Association of Fluoroquinolone Resistance, Virulence Genes, and IncF Plasmids with Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 (ST131) and ST405 Clonal Groups 
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy  2013;57(10):4736-4742.
The global increase of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli is associated with the specific clonal group sequence type 131 (ST131). In order to understand the successful spread of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups, we characterized fluoroquinolone resistance determinants, virulence genotypes, and plasmid replicons of ST131 and another global clonal group, ST405. We investigated 41 ST131-O25b, 26 ST131-O16, 41 ST405, and 41 other ST (OST) ESBL-producing isolates, which were collected at seven acute care hospitals in Japan. The detection of ESBL types, fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations (including quinolone resistance-determining regions [QRDRs]), virulence genotypes, plasmid replicon types, and IncF replicon sequence types was performed using PCR and sequencing. blaCTX-M, specifically blaCTX-M-14, was the most common ESBL gene type among the four groups. Ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 90% of ST131-O25b, 19% of ST131-O16, 100% of ST405, and 54% of OST isolates. Multidrug resistance was more common in the ST405 group than in the ST131-O25 group (56% versus 32%; P = 0.045). All ST131-O25b isolates except one had four characteristic mutations in QRDRs, but most of the isolates from the other three groups had three mutations in common. The ST131-O25b and ST405 groups had larger numbers of virulence genes than the OST group. All of the ST131-O25b and ST405 isolates and most of the ST131-O16 and OST isolates carried IncF replicons. The most prevalent IncF replicon sequence types differed between the four clonal groups. Both the ST131-O25b and ST405 clonal groups had a fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism in QRDRs, multidrug resistance, high virulence, and IncF plasmids, suggesting the potential for further global expansion and a need for measures against these clonal groups.
doi:10.1128/AAC.00641-13
PMCID: PMC3811414  PMID: 23856781
4.  Clinical characteristics and risk factors of non-Candida fungaemia 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2013;13:247.
Background
The incidence of fungaemia has been increasing worldwide. It is important to distinguish non-Candida fungaemia from candidaemia because of their different antifungal susceptibilities. The aims of this study were to investigate the clinical characteristics of non-Candida fungaemia and identify the clinical factors that differentiate it from candidaemia.
Methods
We investigated the clinical manifestations and mortality of non-Candida fungaemia in Kyoto University Hospital from 2004 to 2009.
Results
There were 110 episodes of fungaemia during the study period. There were 11 renal replacement therapy episodes of fungaemia due to non-Candida yeasts (10.0%), including 6 episodes with Cryptococcus neoformans, 4 with Trichosporon asahii, and 1 with Kodamaea ohmeri, in addition to 99 episodes of candidaemia (90.0%). The presence of collagen disease [odds ratio (OR) 9.00; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.58-51.4; P = 0.01] or renal replacement therapy (OR 15.0; 95% CI 3.06-73.4; P < 0.01) was significantly more common in non-Candida fungaemia patients than in candidaemia patients. Prior colonisation by the species may be a predictor of non-Candida fungaemia. Non-Candida fungaemia had a higher mortality than candidaemia (54.5% versus 21.2%, P = 0.03).
Conclusions
Although Candida species frequently cause fungaemia, we should also be aware of non-Candida yeasts because of their high mortality, particularly among high-risk patients, such as those with collagen disease and those under renal replacement therapy. Prior colonisation by the causative organisms may be an important predictor of non-Candida fungaemia.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-13-247
PMCID: PMC3668224  PMID: 23714136
Fungaemia; Non-Candida yeast; Risk factor; Mortality; Colonisation
5.  Clinical characteristics of Pneumocystis pneumonia in non-HIV patients and prognostic factors including microbiological genotypes 
Background
The number of patients with non-HIV Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is increasing with widespread immunosuppressive treatment. We investigated the clinical characteristics of non-HIV PCP and its association with microbiological genotypes.
Methods
Between January 2005 and March 2010, all patients in 2 university hospitals who had been diagnosed with PCP by PCR were enrolled in this study. Retrospective chart review of patients, microbiological genotypes, and association with 30-day mortality were examined.
Results
Of the 82 adult patients investigated, 50 patients (61%) had inflammatory diseases, 17 (21%) had solid malignancies, 12 (15%) had hematological malignancies, and 6 (7%) had received transplantations. All patients received immunosuppressive agents or antitumor chemotherapeutic drugs. Plasma (1→3) β-D-glucan levels were elevated in 80% of patients, and were significantly reduced after treatment in both survivors and non-survivors. However, β-D-glucan increased in 18% of survivors and was normal in only 33% after treatment. Concomitant invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was detected in 5 patients. Fifty-six respiratory samples were stored for genotyping. A dihydropteroate synthase mutation associated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance was found in only 1 of the 53 patients. The most prevalent genotype of mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA was genotype 1, followed by genotype 4. The most prevalent genotype of internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear rRNA operon was Eb, followed by Eg and Bi. Thirty-day mortality was 24%, in which logistic regression analysis revealed association with serum albumin and mechanical ventilation, but no association with genotypes.
Conclusions
In non-HIV PCP, poorer general and respiratory conditions at diagnosis were independent predictors of mortality. β-D-glucan may not be useful for monitoring the response to treatment, and genotypes were not associated with mortality.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-11-76
PMCID: PMC3073915  PMID: 21439061

Results 1-5 (5)