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1.  Faculty Development Program Models to Advance Teaching and Learning Within Health Science Programs 
Within health science programs there has been a call for more faculty development, particularly for teaching and learning. The primary objectives of this review were to describe the current landscape for faculty development programs for teaching and learning and make recommendations for the implementation of new faculty development programs. A thorough search of the pertinent health science databases was conducted, including the Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), MEDLINE, and EMBASE, and faculty development books and relevant information found were reviewed in order to provide recommendations for best practices. Faculty development for teaching and learning comes in a variety of forms, from individuals charged to initiate activities to committees and centers. Faculty development has been effective in improving faculty perceptions on the value of teaching, increasing motivation and enthusiasm for teaching, increasing knowledge and behaviors, and disseminating skills. Several models exist that can be implemented to support faculty teaching development. Institutions need to make informed decisions about which plan could be most successfully implemented in their college or school.
doi:10.5688/ajpe78599
PMCID: PMC4064499  PMID: 24954939
faculty development; faculty learning community; teaching; learning
3.  Teaching Medication Adherence in US Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy 
Objective. To determine and describe the nature and extent of medication adherence education in US colleges and schools of pharmacy.
Methods. A mixed-methods research study was conducted that included a national survey of pharmacy faculty members, a national survey of pharmacy students, and phone interviews of 3 faculty members and 6 preceptors.
Results. The majority of faculty members and students agreed that background concepts in medication adherence are well covered in pharmacy curricula. Approximately 40% to 65% of the students sampled were not familiar with several adherence interventions. The 6 preceptors who were interviewed felt they were not well-informed on adherence interventions, unclear on what students knew about adherence, and challenged to provide adherence-related activities for students during practice experiences because of practice time constraints.
Conclusions. Intermediate and advanced concepts in medication adherence, such as conducting interventions, are not adequately covered in pharmacy curriculums; therefore stakeholders in pharmacy education must develop national standards and tools to ensure consistent and adequate medication adherence education.
doi:10.5688/ajpe76579
PMCID: PMC3386030  PMID: 22761520
medication adherence; curriculum; medication
4.  A 1-Day Course to Improve the Teaching Effectiveness of Health Professions Faculty Members 
Objective. To determine the effect of a 1-day teaching-methods course for pharmacy and nursing faculty members on teaching proficiency and perceptions of effective teaching.
Design. A 1-day teaching-methods course was created and presented to 12 pharmacy and nursing faculty members. Participants’ teaching sessions were video-recorded pre- and post-course.
Assessment. A panel of educators evaluated pre- and post-course video-recorded teaching presentations to assess teaching effectiveness. Participants completed pre- and post-course self-evaluations and surveys. Panelists’ assessments confirmed significant improvement in 7 of 10 domains. Perceptions of teaching efficacy and proficiency to teach effectively improved after completion of the course.
Conclusion. A 1-day teaching-methods course, requiring minimal resources, is a valuable development resource that can improve teaching effectiveness through enhanced communication and teaching techniques. Because effective teaching is positively correlated with students’ learning, training seminars can be integral to comprehensive quality improvement.
doi:10.5688/ajpe76115
PMCID: PMC3298397  PMID: 22412214
teaching; teaching methods; faculty development; assessment; teaching evaluation

Results 1-4 (4)