PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (64)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
more »
Year of Publication
1.  Nucleotide excision repair polymorphisms may modify ionizing radiation-related breast cancer risk in US radiologic technologists 
Exposure to ionizing radiation has been consistently associated with increased risk of female breast cancer. Although the majority of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation is corrected by the base-excision repair pathway, certain types of multiple-base damage can only be repaired through the nucleotide excision repair pathway. In a nested case–control study of breast cancer in US radiologic technologists exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation (858 cases, 1,083 controls), we examined whether risk of breast cancer conferred by radiation was modified by nucleotide excision gene polymorphisms ERCC2 (XPD) rs13181, ERCC4 (XPF) rs1800067 and rs1800124, ERCC5 (XPG) rs1047769 and rs17655; and ERCC6 rs2228526. Of the 6 ERCC variants examined, only ERCC5 rs17655 showed a borderline main effect association with breast cancer risk (ORGC = 1.1, ORCC = 1.3; p-trend = 0.08), with some indication that individuals carrying the C allele variant were more susceptible to the effects of occupational radiation (EOR/GyGG = 1.0, 95% CI = <0, 6.0; EOR/GyGC/CC = 5.9, 95% CI = 0.9, 14.4; phet = 0.10). ERCC2 rs13181, although not associated with breast cancer risk overall, statistically significantly modified the effect of occupational radiation dose on risk of breast cancer (EOR/GyAA = 9.1, 95% CI = 2.1–21.3; EOR/GyAC/CC = 0.6, 95% CI = <0, 4.6; phet = 0.01). These results suggest that common variants in nucleotide excision repair genes may modify the association between occupational radiation exposure and breast cancer risk.
doi:10.1002/ijc.23779
PMCID: PMC3984912  PMID: 18767034
2.  An Aggregated Analysis of Hormonal Factors and Endometrial Cancer Risk by Parity 
Cancer  2012;119(7):1393-1401.
Background
Nulliparity is associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Less clear is whether nulliparity modifies the association between other established hormone-related risk factors. The proportion of nulliparous women has increased since the mid-1970s, but most individual studies are too small to test the hypothesis that endometrial cancer risk factors may be more strongly associated with risk among nulliparous women compared with parous women.
Methods
We aggregated data on 26,936 postmenopausal, Caucasian nulliparous women (360 endometrial cancers) and 146,583 postmenopausal Caucasian parous women (1,378 endometrial cancers) from four U.S. prospective studies (1979–2006). We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in stratified analyses.
Results
As expected, endometrial cancer risk was higher among nulliparous women than among parous women (HR, nulliparous vs. parous = 1.42, 95% CI 1.26 to 1.60). Stratified associations between endometrial cancer and hormone-related risk factors did not differ among nulliparous vs. parous women: among both groups, oral contraceptives and earlier menopause were associated with reduced risk. The highest HRs were for obesity; body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 (vs. <25 kg/m2) increased endometrial cancer risk three-fold among nulliparous (HR= 3.04, 95% CI 2.34 to 3.94) and parous (HR= 2.88, 95% CI 2.52 to 3.29) women.
Conclusions
The results from this large, pooled analysis of data from four large prospective studies suggest that nulliparity does not modify endometrial cancer risks associated with established hormone-related risk factors.
doi:10.1002/cncr.27909
PMCID: PMC3744666  PMID: 23280123
endometrial cancer; nulliparity; reproductive history; oral contraceptives; hormonal; obesity
3.  Agreement Between Diary Records of Time Spent Outdoors and Personal Ultraviolet Radiation Dose Measurements 
Photochemistry and photobiology  2008;84(3):713-718.
Little is known about the validity of self-recorded sun exposure and time spent outdoors for epidemiological research. The aims of the current study were to assess how well participants’ self-recorded time outdoors compared to objective measurements of personal UVR doses. We enrolled 124 volunteers aged 40 and above who were identified from targeted subgroups of US radiologic technologists. Each volunteer was instructed to wear a polysulfone (PS) dosimeter to measure UVR on their left shoulder and to complete a daily activity diary, listing all activities undertaken in each 30 min interval between 9:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. during a 7 day period. In a linear regression model, self-recorded daily time spent outdoors was associated with an increase of 8.2% (95% CI: 7.3–9.2%) in the personal UVR exposure with every hour spent outdoors. The amount of self-recorded total daily time spent outdoors was better correlated with the personal daily UVR dose for activities conducted near noon time compared to activities conducted in the morning or late afternoon, and for activities often performed in the sun (e.g. gardening or recreation activities) compared to other outdoor activities (e.g. driving) in which the participant is usually shaded from the sun. Our results demonstrated a significant correlation between diary records of time spent outdoors with objective personal UVR dose measurements.
doi:10.1111/j.1751-1097.2007.00236.x
PMCID: PMC3966551  PMID: 18435619
4.  Family history of cancer and non-malignant diseases and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A Children's Oncology Group Study 
Cancer epidemiology  2011;36(1):45-51.
Background
Studies of family history of cancer and non-malignant diseases in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) show inconsistent findings. Most studies show no increased risk with family history of cancer. Non-malignant diseases such as allergic diseases, autoimmune diseases, birth defects and thyroid diseases have been reported to be associated with ALL.
Methods
We conducted a case-control study of family history of cancer and selected non-malignant conditions (allergic diseases, autoimmune diseases, birth defects, and thyroid diseases). ALL cases were obtained from Children's Cancer Group institutions from January 1989 to June 1993. Controls were recruited via random digit dialing. Family history for first degree relatives and grandparents of ALL cases and controls was collected by structured telephone questionnaires. Conditional logistical regression was used to calculate odds ratios adjusting for potential confounders.
Results
We found a borderline association of ALL and having a family member with a history of cancer in cases (n = 1842) compared to controls (n = 1986) (OR = 0.98, 95%CI = 0.93, 1.00) and an inverse association for esophageal cancer based on small numbers. Family history of food and drug allergies demonstrated a modestly reduced risk (OR = 0.83, 95%CI = 0.73, 0.95) as did family history of rheumatoid arthritis (OR = 0.79, 95%CI = 0.65, 0.96). There were no associations with family history of any autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiencies, birth defects, thyroid diseases and risk of childhood ALL.
Conclusions
These results show no association of overall family history of cancer with childhood ALL, while providing additional evidence for an inverse association with family history of allergic disease. Two potentially new associations of ALL with family history of esophageal cancer and rheumatoid arthritis require confirmation in other studies and validation with medical records.
doi:10.1016/j.canep.2011.06.004
PMCID: PMC3962042  PMID: 22018949
Pediatric; Cancer; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia; Case–control study; Autoimmune; Allergies; Family history
5.  Simplified Categorization of Outdoor Activities for Male and Female U.S. Indoor Workers—A Feasibility Study to Improve Assessment of Ultraviolet Radiation Exposures in Epidemiologic Study Questionnaires 
Skin cancer studies depend on questionnaires to estimate exposure to ultraviolet light and subsequent risk but are limited by recall bias. We investigate the feasibility of developing a short checklist of categories comprising outdoor activities that can improve sun exposure questionnaires for use in epidemiologic studies. We recruited 124 working and retired U.S. radiologic technologists (52% women). Each subject was instructed to complete a daily activity diary, listing main indoor and outdoor activities between 9:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. during a 7 day period. A total of 4697 entries were associated with 1408 h (21.1%) of the total 6944 h spent outdoors. We were able to classify the activities into seven main activity categories: driving, yard work, home-maintenance, walking or performing errands, water activities, other recreational or sports activities and leisure activities or relaxing outside. These activities accounted for more than 94% of time spent outdoors both for working and retired men and women. Our data document the feasibility and guidance for developing a short checklist of outdoor activities for use in epidemiologic questionnaires for estimating sunlight exposures of working and retired indoor workers.
doi:10.1111/j.1751-1097.2008.00393.x
PMCID: PMC3956440  PMID: 18643910
6.  OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION DOSES TO OPERATORS PERFORMING FLUOROSCOPICALLY-GUIDED PROCEDURES 
Health physics  2012;103(1):80-99.
In the past 30 years, the numbers and types of fluoroscopically-guided (FG) procedures have increased dramatically. The objective of the present study is to provide estimated radiation doses to physician specialists, other than cardiologists, who perform FG procedures. We searched Medline to identify English-language journal articles reporting radiation exposures to these physicians. We then identified several primarily therapeutic FG procedures that met specific criteria: well-defined procedures for which there were at least five published reports of estimated radiation doses to the operator, procedures performed frequently in current medical practice, and inclusion of physicians from multiple medical specialties. These procedures were percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), vertebroplasty, orthopedic extremity nailing for treatment of fractures, biliary tract procedures, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation (TIPS), head/neck endovascular therapeutic procedures, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We abstracted radiation doses and other associated data, and estimated effective dose to operators. Operators received estimated doses per patient procedure equivalent to doses received by interventional cardiologists. The estimated effective dose per case ranged from 1.7 – 56μSv for PCNL, 0.1 – 101 μSv for vertebroplasty, 2.5 – 88μSv for orthopedic extremity nailing, 2.0 – 46μSv for biliary tract procedures, 2.5 – 74μSv for TIPS, 1.8 – 53μSv for head/neck endovascular therapeutic procedures, and 0.2 – 49μSv for ERCP. Overall, mean operator radiation dose per case measured over personal protective devices at different anatomic sites on the head and body ranged from 19 – 800 (median = 113) μSv at eye level, 6 – 1180 (median = 75)μSv at the neck, and 2 – 1600 (median = 302) μSv at the trunk. Operators’ hands often received greater doses than the eyes, neck or trunk. Large variations in operator doses suggest that optimizing procedure protocols and proper use of protective devices and shields might reduce occupational radiation dose substantially.
doi:10.1097/HP.0b013e31824dae76
PMCID: PMC3951010  PMID: 22647920
interventional procedure; fluoroscopically-guided procedure; occupational exposure; radiation protection
7.  A role for XRCC2 gene polymorphisms in breast cancer risk and survival 
Journal of medical genetics  2011;48(7):477-484.
Background
The XRCC2 gene is a key mediator in the homologous recombination repair of DNA double strand breaks. We hypothesised that inherited variants in the XRCC2 gene might also affect susceptibility to, and survival from, breast cancer.
Methods
We genotyped 12 XRCC2 tagging SNPs in 1,131 breast cancer cases and 1,148 controls from the Sheffield Breast Cancer Study (SBCS), and examined their associations with breast cancer risk and survival by estimating odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs), and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Positive findings were further investigated in 860 cases and 869 controls from the Utah Breast Cancer Study (UBCS) and jointly analysed together with available published data for breast cancer risk. The survival findings were further confirmed in studies (8,074 cases) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC).
Results
The most significant association with breast cancer risk in the SBCS dataset was the XRCC2 rs3218408 SNP (recessive model p=2.3×10−4, MAF=0.23). This SNP yielded an ORrec (95% CI) of 1.64 (1.25–2.16) in a two-site analysis of SBCS and UBCS, and a meta-ORrec (95% CI) of 1.33 (1.12–1.57) when all published data were included. This SNP may mark a rare risk haplotype carried by 2 in 1000 of the control population. Furthermore, the XRCC2 coding R188H SNP (rs3218536, MAF=0.08) was significantly associated with poor survival, with an increased per-allele HR (95% CI) of 1.58 (1.01–2.49) in a multivariate analysis. This effect was still evident in a pooled meta-analysis of 8,781 breast cancer patients from the BCAC [HR (95% CI) of 1.19 (1.05–1.36), p=0.01].
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that XRCC2 SNPs may influence breast cancer risk and survival.
doi:10.1136/jmedgenet-2011-100018
PMCID: PMC3932658  PMID: 21632523
Single nucleotide polymorphism; XRCC2; breast cancer risk; breast cancer survival
8.  Blood Transfusion, Anesthesia, Surgery and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in a Population-Based Case-Control Study 
The incidence of NHL has increased dramatically since at least the 1950s, and during this timeframe there has been a major increase in the use of blood transfusions, invasive surgical procedures, and anesthesia, all of which can impact immune function. We evaluated these factors with NHL risk in a population-based study of 759 cases and 589 frequency-matched controls. Risk factor data were collected during in-person interviews. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs, adjusted for the matching factors. History of transfusion was associated with a 26% higher risk of NHL (95% CI 0.91–1.73), and the elevated risk was specific to transfusions first given 5–29 years before the reference date (OR=1.69; 95% CI 1.08–2.62) and transfusions given for a medical condition (OR=2.09; 95% CI 1.03–4.26). The total number of surgeries and dental procedures (OR=1.53 for 26+ surgeries compared to 0–6; 95% CI 1.02–2.29) and to a lesser extent the total number of exposures to general or local/regional anesthesia (OR=1.35 for 24+ times compared to 0–6; 95% CI 0.91–2.02) were positively associated with risk of NHL. Inclusion of transfusion and surgery or transfusion and anesthesia in the same model did not attenuate these associations. All results were broadly consistent for both DLBCL and follicular subtypes. Blood transfusions were associated with NHL risk, but appear to be a marker for underlying medical conditions. Multiple surgical procedures and/or repeated administration of anesthesia have not been previously reported to be associated with risk of NHL and these exposures warrant further evaluation.
doi:10.1002/ijc.23561
PMCID: PMC3913466  PMID: 18506687
anesthesia; blood transfusion; non-Hodgkin lymphoma; surgery
9.  Household endotoxin levels and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma 
Cancer causes & control : CCC  2013;24(2):357-364.
Objective
Endotoxin, a component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, elicits a strong innate and inflammatory immune response associated with secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Because TNF-α polymorphisms that increase TNF-α production are associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we hypothesized that increased levels of household endotoxin would be associated with an increased NHL risk.
Methods
We evaluated this association in the National Cancer Institute/Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Result (NCI/SEER) NHL multi-center population-based case-control study. Used vacuum cleaner bags were collected from participants during a home interview. Dust samples from the bags of 594 cases and 442 controls were analyzed for endotoxin (Endotoxin Unit [EU]/mg of dust) using the kinetic chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the effect of endotoxin on NHL risk adjusted for age, sex, race, education, study center, and farm exposure.
Results
Endotoxin was not associated with NHL overall (odds ratio [OR] for highest quartile of endotoxin levels = 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]= 0.55,1.20; P for trend=0.35), or with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (OR= 0.63, 95% CI= 0.34, 1.16; P= 0.31) or follicular lymphoma (OR= 0.1.07, 95% CI=0.61, 1.89; P=0.73) subtypes. Both working and living on a farm were associated with higher household endotoxin levels compared to never working (P=0.009) or living (P=0.01) on a farm. Excluding farmers from the analysis did not change the results.
Conclusions
We found no evidence of a role for household endotoxin in NHL etiology.
doi:10.1007/s10552-012-0121-9
PMCID: PMC3800025  PMID: 23277417
Endotoxin; Non-Hodgkin lymphoma; Epidemiology; Farming; Risk; Case-control
10.  Sunlight and Other Determinants of Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels in Black and White Participants in a Nationwide US Study 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2013;177(2):180-192.
Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), a marker for vitamin D status, is associated with bone health and possibly cancers and other diseases; yet, the determinants of 25(OH)D status, particularly ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, are poorly understood. Determinants of 25(OH)D were analyzed in a subcohort of 1,500 participants of the US Radiologic Technologists (USRT) Study that included whites (n = 842), blacks (n = 646), and people of other races/ethnicities (n = 12). Participants were recruited monthly (2008–2009) across age, sex, race, and ambient UVR level groups. Questionnaires addressing UVR and other exposures were generally completed within 9 days of blood collection. The relation between potential determinants and 25(OH)D levels was examined through regression analysis in a random two-thirds sample and validated in the remaining one third. In the regression model for the full study population, age, race, body mass index, some seasons, hours outdoors being physically active, and vitamin D supplement use were associated with 25(OH)D levels. In whites, generally, the same factors were explanatory. In blacks, only age and vitamin D supplement use predicted 25(OH)D concentrations. In the full population, determinants accounted for 25% of circulating 25(OH)D variability, with similar correlations for subgroups. Despite detailed data on UVR and other factors near the time of blood collection, the ability to explain 25(OH)D was modest.
doi:10.1093/aje/kws223
PMCID: PMC3590034  PMID: 23292956
dietary supplements; 25-hydroxyvitamin D; race; seasons; sex; sunlight; ultraviolet rays; vitamin D
11.  Guidelines for Exposure Assessment in Health Risk Studies Following a Nuclear Reactor Accident 
Background: Worldwide concerns regarding health effects after the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents indicate a clear need to identify short- and long-term health impacts that might result from accidents in the future. Fundamental to addressing this problem are reliable and accurate radiation dose estimates for the affected populations. The available guidance for activities following nuclear accidents is limited with regard to strategies for dose assessment in health risk studies.
Objectives: Here we propose a comprehensive systematic approach to estimating radiation doses for the evaluation of health risks resulting from a nuclear power plant accident, reflected in a set of seven guidelines.
Discussion: Four major nuclear reactor accidents have occurred during the history of nuclear power production. The circumstances leading to these accidents were varied, as were the magnitude of the releases of radioactive materials, the pathways by which persons were exposed, the data collected afterward, and the lifestyle factors and dietary consumption that played an important role in the associated radiation exposure of the affected populations. Accidents involving nuclear reactors may occur in the future under a variety of conditions. The guidelines we recommend here are intended to facilitate obtaining reliable dose estimations for a range of different exposure conditions. We recognize that full implementation of the proposed approach may not always be feasible because of other priorities during the nuclear accident emergency and because of limited resources in manpower and equipment.
Conclusions: The proposed approach can serve as a basis to optimize the value of radiation dose reconstruction following a nuclear reactor accident.
Citation: Bouville A, Linet MS, Hatch M, Mabuchi K, Simon SL. 2014. Guidelines for exposure assessment in health risk studies following a nuclear reactor accident. Environ Health Perspect 122:1–5; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307120
doi:10.1289/ehp.1307120
PMCID: PMC3888574  PMID: 24184886
12.  Reconstruction of Absorbed Doses to Fibroglandular Tissue of the Breast of Women undergoing Mammography (1960 to the Present) 
Radiation research  2011;177(1):92-108.
The assessment of potential benefits versus harms from mammographic examinations as described in the controversial breast cancer screening recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Task Force included limited consideration of absorbed dose to the fibroglandular tissue of the breast (glandular tissue dose), the tissue at risk for breast cancer. Epidemiological studies on cancer risks associated with diagnostic radiological examinations often lack accurate information on glandular tissue dose, and there is a clear need for better estimates of these doses. Our objective was to develop a quantitative summary of glandular tissue doses from mammography by considering sources of variation over time in key parameters including imaging protocols, x-ray target materials, voltage, filtration, incident air kerma, compressed breast thickness, and breast composition. We estimated the minimum, maximum, and mean values for glandular tissue dose for populations of exposed women within 5-year periods from 1960 to the present, with the minimum to maximum range likely including 90% to 95% of the entirety of the dose range from mammography in North America and Europe. Glandular tissue dose from a single view in mammography is presently about 2 mGy, about one-sixth the dose in the 1960s. The ratio of our estimates of maximum to minimum glandular tissue doses for average-size breasts was about 100 in the 1960s compared to a ratio of about 5 in recent years. Findings from our analysis provide quantitative information on glandular tissue doses from mammographic examinations which can be used in epidemiologic studies of breast cancer.
PMCID: PMC3876279  PMID: 21988547
glandular tissue dose; historical dose estimates; breast; mammography; literature review
13.  Basal cell carcinoma and anthropometric factors in the U.S. Radiologic Technologists Cohort Study 
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in Caucasian populations. Although several risk factors are well-established, including ultraviolet radiation (UVR) sensitivity and exposure, few studies have examined anthropometric measures and BCC. Using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, we prospectively investigated the relationship between height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) and BCC in 58,213 Caucasian participants (11,631 men and 46,582 women) from the United States Radiological Technologists cohort. This analysis was limited to participants who were cancer-free at baseline. The baseline questionnaire provided self-reported anthropometric factors and the subsequent questionnaire collected skin cancer susceptibility factors, lifetime UVR exposure derived from residential and personal UVR exposure (time outdoors), and health outcomes. During 509,465 person-years of follow-up, we identified 2,291 BCC cases (486 men; 1,805 women). BCC risk increased with increasing height, and decreased with increasing weight and BMI in both sexes, even after adjusting for UVR susceptibility factors and exposures. For BMI categories: <25 (reference); 25–<30; 30–<35; and ≥ 35 kg/m2, multivariate hazard ratios (HR) in women were: 1.00; 0.74 (95% CI=0.66–0.83); 0.67 (0.56–0.81); and 0.57 (0.44–0.74) respectively, p-trend ≤0.0001. Risks were similar in men. The inverse association between BMI and BCC was unaffected by controlling for sun-related exposures. Nevertheless, it may at least partly reflect residual UVR confounding. Further research with more detailed sun exposure data, including clothing patterns, would help clarify the relationship between BMI and BCC.
doi:10.1002/ijc.26480
PMCID: PMC3873091  PMID: 21989791
Basal cell carcinoma; weight; height; body mass index
14.  Sunlight, Polymorphisms of Vitamin D-related Genes and Risk of Breast Cancer 
Anticancer research  2013;33(2):543-551.
Background/Aim
Geographic gradients in breast cancer incidence and mortality suggest that vitamin D may reduce risk. The enzyme 25-hydroxyvitamin D 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1), which degrades the active form of vitamin D, and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) are both found in breast tissue. We investigated six polymorphisms in CYP24A1 and two in the VDR gene in association with breast cancer risk.
Materials and Methods
We conducted a case--control study within the nationwide U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort, including 845 controls and 484 incident breast cancer cases. Associations of polymorphic variants and ecologic and personal measures of sun exposure with breast cancer risk were assessed using unconditional logistic regression.
Results
Two polymorphisms in CYP24A1 were associated with increased breast cancer risk (rs34043203, Ptrend = 0.03; rs2762934, Ptrend = 0.005) and one with reduced breast cancer risk (rs1570669, Ptrend=0.048). Risk was inversely associated with minor alleles for the VDR Bsm1 polymorphism (rs1544410, Ptrend = 0.05) but not Fok1 (rs2228570). Sunlight measures were not associated with breast cancer risk, however significant interactions between time outdoors in the teen years and three unlinked genotypes were found for VDR (rs1544410, rs2228570) and CYP24A1 (rs1570669).
Conclusion
In this nation-wide breast cancer case--control study, we found the vitamin D pathway was involved in disease etiology and further suggest that reduced cancer risk in association with sunlight may depend on timing of exposure and genetic background. These findings merit further investigation.
PMCID: PMC3866631  PMID: 23393347
Vitamin D; sunlight; polymorphisms; breast cancer; gene; case—control
16.  Occupational exposure to chlorinated solvents and risks of glioma and meningioma in adults 
Occupational and environmental medicine  2012;69(11):10.1136/oemed-2012-100742.
Objectives
Chlorinated solvents are classified as probable or possible carcinogens. It is unknown whether exposure to these agents increases the risk of malignant or benign brain tumors. Our objective was to evaluate associations of brain tumor risk with occupational exposure to six chlorinated solvents [i.e., dichloromethane, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene].
Methods
489 glioma cases, 197 meningioma cases, and 799 controls were enrolled in a hospital-based case-control study conducted at three U.S. hospitals in Arizona, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. Information about occupational history was obtained through a detailed in-person interview that included job-specific modules of questions such that the interview was tailored to each individual’s particular work history. An industrial hygienist assessed potential solvent exposure based on this information and an exhaustive review of the relevant industrial hygiene literature. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for each solvent for ever/never, duration, cumulative, average weekly, and highest exposure.
Results
Overall, we found no consistent evidence of an increased risk of glioma or meningioma related to occupational exposure to the six chlorinated solvents evaluated. There was some suggestion of an association between carbon tetrachloride and glioma in analyses restricted to exposed subjects, with average weekly exposure above the median associated with increased risk compared to below-median exposure (OR=7.1, 95%CI: 1.1, 45.2).
Conclusions
We found no consistent evidence for increased brain tumor risk related to chlorinated solvents.
doi:10.1136/oemed-2012-100742
PMCID: PMC3850418  PMID: 22864249
epidemiology; cancer; solvents
17.  Comparison of occupational exposure assessment methods in a case-control study of lead, genetic susceptibility and risk of adult brain tumors 
Occupational and environmental medicine  2010;68(1):10.1136/oem.2009.048132.
Objectives
There is great interest in evaluating gene-environment interactions with chemical exposures, but exposure assessment poses a unique challenge in case-control studies. Expert assessment of detailed work history data is usually considered the best approach, but it is a laborious and time-consuming process. We set out to determine if a less intensive method of exposure assessment (a job exposure matrix [JEM]) would produce similar results to a previous analysis that found evidence of effect modification between expert assessed-lead exposure and risk of brain tumors by a single nucleotide polymorphism in the ALAD gene (rs1800435).
Methods
We used data from a study of 355 patients with glioma, 151 patients with meningioma and 505 controls. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between brain tumor risk and lead exposure and effect modification by genotype. We evaluated Cohen’s kappa, sensitivity and specificity for the JEM compared to the expert-assessed exposure metrics.
Results
Although effect estimates were imprecise and driven by a small number of cases, we found evidence of effect modification between lead exposure and ALAD genotype when using expert- but not JEM-derived lead exposure estimates. Kappa values indicated only modest agreement (< 0.5) for the exposure metrics, with the JEM indicating high specificity (~0.9) but poor sensitivity (~0.5). Disagreement between the two methods was generally due to having additional information in the detailed work history.
Conclusion
These results provide preliminary evidence suggesting that high quality exposure data are likely to improve the ability to detect genetic effect modification.
doi:10.1136/oem.2009.048132
PMCID: PMC3828743  PMID: 20798009
18.  Genome-wide Association Study of Glioma and Meta-Analysis 
Human genetics  2012;131(12):1877-1888.
Gliomas account for approximately 80% of all primary malignant brain tumors, and despite improvements in clinical care over the last 20 years remain among the most lethal tumors, underscoring the need for gaining new insights that could translate into clinical advances. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified seven new susceptibility regions. We conducted a new independent GWAS of glioma using 1,856 cases and 4,955 controls (from 14 cohort studies, 3 casecontrol studies, and 1 population-based case only study) and found evidence of strong replication for three of the seven previously reported associations at 20q13.33 (RTEL), 5p15.33 (TERT), and 9p21.3 (CDKN2BAS), and consistent association signals for the remaining four at 7p11.2 (EGFR both loci), 8q24.21 (CCDC26) and 11q23.3 (PHLDB1). The direction and magnitude of the signal were consistent for samples from cohort and case-control studies, but the strength of the association was more pronounced for loci rs6010620 (20q,13.33; RTEL) and rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT) in cohort studies despite the smaller number of cases in this group, likely due to relatively more higher grade tumors being captured in the cohort studies. We further examined the 85 most promising single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers identified in our study in three replication sets (5,015 cases and 11,601 controls), but no new markers reached genome-wide significance. Our findings suggest that larger studies focusing on novel approaches as well as specific tumor subtypes or subgroups will be required to identify additional common susceptibility loci for glioma risk.
doi:10.1007/s00439-012-1212-0
PMCID: PMC3761216  PMID: 22886559
19.  Insight in glioma susceptibility through an analysis of 6p22.3, 12p13.33-12.1, 17q22-23.2 and 18q23 SNP genotypes in familial and non-familial glioma 
Human genetics  2012;131(9):1507-1517.
Background
The risk of glioma has consistently been shown to be increased two-fold in relatives of patients with primary brain tumors (PBT). A recent genome-wide linkage study of glioma families provided evidence for a disease locus on 17q12-21.32, with the possibility of four additional risk loci at 6p22.3, 12p13.33-12.1, 17q22-23.2, and 18q23.
Methods
To identify the underlying genetic variants responsible for the linkage signals, we compared the genotype frequencies of 5,122 SNPs mapping to these five regions in 88 glioma cases with and 1,100 cases without a family history of PBT (discovery study). An additional series of 84 familial and 903 non-familial cases were used to replicate associations.
Results
In the discovery study, 12 SNPs showed significant associations with family history of PBT (P < 0.001). In the replication study, two of the 12 SNPs were confirmed: 12p13.33-12.1 PRMT8 rs17780102 (P = 0.031) and 17q12-21.32 SPOP rs650461 (P = 0.025). In the combined analysis of discovery and replication studies, the strongest associations were attained at four SNPs: 12p13.33-12.1 PRMT8 rs17780102 (P = 0.0001), SOX5 rs7305773 (P = 0.0001) and STKY1 rs2418087 (P = 0.0003), and 17q12-21.32 SPOP rs6504618 (P = 0.0006). Further, a significant gene-dosage effect was found for increased risk of family history of PBT with these four SNPs in the combined data set (Ptrend < 1.0 ×10−8).
Conclusion
The results support the linkage finding that some loci in the 12p13.33-12.1 and 17q12-q21.32 may contribute to gliomagenesis and suggest potential target genes underscoring linkage signals.
doi:10.1007/s00439-012-1187-x
PMCID: PMC3604903  PMID: 22688887
Association; Polymorphisms; Glioma; Family history of primary brain tumor; Linkage analysis
20.  Cancer Risks Associated with External Radiation From Diagnostic Imaging Procedures 
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians  2012;10.3322/caac.21132.
The 600% increase in medical radiation exposure to the US population since 1980 has provided immense benefit, but potential future cancer risks to patients. Most of the increase is from diagnostic radiologic procedures. The objectives of this review are to summarize epidemiologic data on cancer risks associated with diagnostic procedures, describe how exposures from recent diagnostic procedures relate to radiation levels linked with cancer occurrence, and propose a framework of strategies to reduce radiation from diagnostic imaging in patients. We briefly review radiation dose definitions, mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis, key epidemiologic studies of medical and other radiation sources and cancer risks, and dose trends from diagnostic procedures. We describe cancer risks from experimental studies, future projected risks from current imaging procedures, and the potential for higher risks in genetically susceptible populations. To reduce future projected cancers from diagnostic procedures, we advocate widespread use of evidence-based appropriateness criteria for decisions about imaging procedures, oversight of equipment to deliver reliably the minimum radiation required to attain clinical objectives, development of electronic lifetime records of imaging procedures for patients and their physicians, and commitment by medical training programs, professional societies, and radiation protection organizations to educate all stakeholders in reducing radiation from diagnostic procedures.
doi:10.3322/caac.21132
PMCID: PMC3548988  PMID: 22307864
21.  Association between adult height, genetic susceptibility and risk of glioma 
Background Some, but not all, observational studies have suggested that taller stature is associated with a significant increased risk of glioma. In a pooled analysis of observational studies, we investigated the strength and consistency of this association, overall and for major sub-types, and investigated effect modification by genetic susceptibility to the disease.
Methods We standardized and combined individual-level data on 1354 cases and 4734 control subjects from 13 prospective and 2 case–control studies. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for glioma and glioma sub-types were estimated using logistic regression models stratified by sex and adjusted for birth cohort and study. Pooled ORs were additionally estimated after stratifying the models according to seven recently identified glioma-related genetic variants.
Results Among men, we found a positive association between height and glioma risk (≥190 vs 170–174 cm, pooled OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.11–2.61; P-trend = 0.01), which was slightly stronger after restricting to cases with glioblastoma (pooled OR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.17–3.38; P-trend = 0.02). Among women, these associations were less clear (≥175 vs 160–164 cm, pooled OR for glioma = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.70–1.62; P-trend = 0.22; pooled OR for glioblastoma = 1.36, 95% CI: 0.77–2.39; P-trend = 0.04). In general, we did not observe evidence of effect modification by glioma-related genotypes on the association between height and glioma risk.
Conclusion An association of taller adult stature with glioma, particularly for men and stronger for glioblastoma, should be investigated further to clarify the role of environmental and genetic determinants of height in the etiology of this disease.
doi:10.1093/ije/dys114
PMCID: PMC3429876  PMID: 22933650
Height; brain cancer; glioma; cancer; epidemiology
22.  Physical activity, diabetes, and thyroid cancer risk: a pooled analysis of five prospective studies 
Cancer causes & control : CCC  2012;10.1007/s10552-012-9896-y.
Purpose
Although many studies have linked obesity with increased risk of thyroid cancer, few have investigated the role of obesity-related lifestyle characteristics and medical conditions in the etiology of this disease. We examined the associations of self-reported physical activity and diabetes history with thyroid cancer risk in a large pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies.
Methods
Data from five prospective studies in the U.S. (n=362,342 men, 312,149 women) were coded using standardized exposure, covariate, and outcome definitions. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for thyroid cancer were estimated using age as the time metric and adjusting for sex, education, race, marital status, cigarette smoking, body mass index, alcohol intake, and cohort. Effect modification by other risk factors (e.g. age, sex, body mass index) and differences by cancer subtype (e.g. papillary, follicular) were also examined.
Results
Over follow-up (median=10.5 years), 308 men and 510 women were diagnosed with a first primary thyroid cancer. Overall, subjects reporting the greatest amount of physical activity had an increased risk of the disease (HR=1.18, 95% CI:1.00-1.39); however, this association was restricted to participants who were overweight/obese (≥25 kg/m2; HR=1.34, 95% CI:1.09-1.64) as opposed to normal-weight (<25 kg/m2; HR=0.92, 95% CI:0.69-1.22; P-interaction=0.03). We found no overall association between self-reported history of diabetes and thyroid cancer risk (HR=1.08, 95% CI:0.83-1.40).
Conclusion
Neither physical inactivity nor diabetes history was associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer. While it may have been a chance finding, the possible increased risk associated with greater physical activity warrants further investigation.
doi:10.1007/s10552-012-9896-y
PMCID: PMC3586378  PMID: 22294499
physical activity; energy expenditure; type 2 diabetes; insulin resistance; thyroid neoplasms; prospective study
23.  Leukemia-related chromosomal loss detected in hematopoietic progenitor cells of benzene-exposed workers 
Benzene exposure causes acute myeloid leukemia, and hematotoxicity, shown as suppression of mature blood and myeloid progenitor cell numbers. As the leukemia-related aneuploidies monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 previously had been detected in the mature peripheral blood cells of exposed workers, we hypothesized that benzene could cause leukemia through the induction of these aneuploidies in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We measured loss and gain of chromosomes 7 and 8 by fluorescence in situ hybridization in interphase colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) cells cultured from otherwise healthy benzene-exposed (n=28) and unexposed (n=14) workers. CFU-GM monosomy 7 and 8 levels (but not trisomy) were significantly increased in subjects exposed to benzene overall, compared to levels in the control subjects (p=0.0055 and p=0.0034, respectively). Levels of monosomy 7 and 8 were significantly increased in subjects exposed to <10 ppm (20%, p=0.0419 and 28%, p=0.0056, respectively) and ≥10 ppm (48%, p=0.0045 and 32%, p=0.0354) benzene, compared with controls, and significant exposure-response trends were detected (ptrend=0.0033 and 0.0057). These data show that monosomies 7 and 8 are produced in a dose-dependent fashion in the blood progenitor cells of workers exposed to benzene and may be mechanistically relevant biomarkers of early effect for benzene and other leukemogens.
doi:10.1038/leu.2012.143
PMCID: PMC3472034  PMID: 22643707
Benzene; leukemia; monosomy; hematopoietic progenitor
24.  Common genetic variants in the 8q24 region and risk of papillary thyroid cancer 
The Laryngoscope  2012;122(5):1040-1042.
Objectives/Hypothesis
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 8q24 chromosomal region identified from genome-wide scans have been associated with risk of several cancers including breast (rs1562430), prostate and colon (rs1447295 and rs6983267). A genome-wide scan in 26 families with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) also found susceptibility loci in 8q24, supporting a closer evaluation of this chromosomal region in relation to risk of sporadic PTC.
Study Design
We evaluated 157 tag SNPs in the 8q24 chromosomal region between 120.91 Mb and 128.78 Mb (including rs1562430, rs1447295, and rs6983267) in a case-control study of 344 PTC cases and 452 age and gender frequency-matched controls.
Methods
We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and compute P-values of linear trend for PTC with genotypes of interest. To account for multiple comparisons, we applied the false discovery rate (FDR) method.
Results
We did not find a significant association between rs1562430, rs1447295, or rs6983267, and PTC risk. We found that one SNP (rs4733616) was associated with PTC risk at P = 0.003, and twelve other SNPs were associated with PTC risk at P < 0.05. However, no SNPs remained significant after FDR correction.
Conclusions
Our findings do not support a strong association between SNPs in the 8q24 chromosomal region and risk of sporadic PTC but several SNPs with small effects might exist.
doi:10.1002/lary.23209
PMCID: PMC3408055  PMID: 22275265
8q24; thyroid cancer
25.  Individual, Environmental, and Meteorological Predictors of Daily Personal Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure Measurements in a United States Cohort Study 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(2):e54983.
Background
Individual exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is challenging to measure, particularly for diseases with substantial latency periods between first exposure and diagnosis of outcome, such as cancer. To guide the choice of surrogates for long-term UVR exposure in epidemiologic studies, we assessed how well stable sun-related individual characteristics and environmental/meteorological factors predicted daily personal UVR exposure measurements.
Methods
We evaluated 123 United States Radiologic Technologists subjects who wore personal UVR dosimeters for 8 hours daily for up to 7 days (N = 837 days). Potential predictors of personal UVR derived from a self-administered questionnaire, and public databases that provided daily estimates of ambient UVR and weather conditions. Factors potentially related to personal UVR exposure were tested individually and in a model including all significant variables.
Results
The strongest predictors of daily personal UVR exposure in the full model were ambient UVR, latitude, daily rainfall, and skin reaction to prolonged sunlight (R2 = 0.30). In a model containing only environmental and meteorological variables, ambient UVR, latitude, and daily rainfall were the strongest predictors of daily personal UVR exposure (R2 = 0.25).
Conclusions
In the absence of feasible measures of individual longitudinal sun exposure history, stable personal characteristics, ambient UVR, and weather parameters may help estimate long-term personal UVR exposure.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0054983
PMCID: PMC3566166  PMID: 23405102

Results 1-25 (64)