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1.  Hit selection with false discovery rate control in genome-scale RNAi screens 
Nucleic Acids Research  2008;36(14):4667-4679.
RNA interference (RNAi) is a modality in which small double-stranded RNA molecules (siRNAs) designed to lead to the degradation of specific mRNAs are introduced into cells or organisms. siRNA libraries have been developed in which siRNAs targeting virtually every gene in the human genome are designed, synthesized and are presented for introduction into cells by transfection in a microtiter plate array. These siRNAs can then be transfected into cells using high-throughput screening (HTS) methodologies. The goal of RNAi HTS is to identify a set of siRNAs that inhibit or activate defined cellular phenotypes. The commonly used analysis methods including median ± kMAD have issues about error rates in multiple hypothesis testing and plate-wise versus experiment-wise analysis. We propose a methodology based on a Bayesian framework to address these issues. Our approach allows for sharing of information across plates in a plate-wise analysis, which obviates the need for choosing either a plate-wise or experimental-wise analysis. The proposed approach incorporates information from reliable controls to achieve a higher power and a balance between the contribution from the samples and control wells. Our approach provides false discovery rate (FDR) control to address multiple testing issues and it is robust to outliers.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkn435
PMCID: PMC2504311  PMID: 18628291
2.  Small Interfering RNA Screens Reveal Enhanced Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Tumor Cells Having both BRCA Network and TP53 Disruptions▿ ‡  
Molecular and Cellular Biology  2006;26(24):9377-9386.
RNA interference technology allows the systematic genetic analysis of the molecular alterations in cancer cells and how these alterations affect response to therapies. Here we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens to identify genes that enhance the cytotoxicity (enhancers) of established anticancer chemotherapeutics. Hits identified in drug enhancer screens of cisplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel were largely unique to the drug being tested and could be linked to the drug's mechanism of action. Hits identified by screening of a genome-scale siRNA library for cisplatin enhancers in TP53-deficient HeLa cells were significantly enriched for genes with annotated functions in DNA damage repair as well as poorly characterized genes likely having novel functions in this process. We followed up on a subset of the hits from the cisplatin enhancer screen and validated a number of enhancers whose products interact with BRCA1 and/or BRCA2. TP53+/− matched-pair cell lines were used to determine if knockdown of BRCA1, BRCA2, or validated hits that associate with BRCA1 and BRCA2 selectively enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity in TP53-deficient cells. Silencing of BRCA1, BRCA2, or BRCA1/2-associated genes enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity ∼4- to 7-fold more in TP53-deficient cells than in matched TP53 wild-type cells. Thus, tumor cells having disruptions in BRCA1/2 network genes and TP53 together are more sensitive to cisplatin than cells with either disruption alone.
doi:10.1128/MCB.01229-06
PMCID: PMC1698535  PMID: 17000754

Results 1-2 (2)