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1.  Baseline-Dependent Effect of Noise-Enhanced Insoles on Gait Variability in Healthy Elderly Walkers 
Gait & posture  2012;36(3):537-540.
The purpose of this study was to determine whether providing subsensory stochastic-resonance mechanical vibration to the foot soles of elderly walkers could decrease gait variability. In a randomized double-blind controlled trial, twenty nine (29) subjects engaged in treadmill walking while wearing sandals customized with three (3) actuators capable of producing stochastic-resonance mechanical vibration embedded in each sole. For each subject, we determined a subsensory level of vibration stimulation. After a 5-minute acclimation period of walking with the footwear, subjects were asked to walk on the treadmill for six (6) trials, each thirty (30) seconds long. Trials were pair-wise random: in three trials, actuators provided subsensory vibration; in the other trials, they did not. Subjects wore reflective markers to track body motion. Stochastic-resonance mechanical stimulation exhibited baseline-dependent effects on spatial stride-to-stride variability in gait, slightly increasing variability in subjects with least baseline variability and providing greater reductions in variability for subjects with greater baseline variability (p < .001). Thus, applying stochastic-resonance mechanical vibrations on the plantar surface of the foot reduces gait variability for subjects with more variable gait. Stochastic-resonance mechanical vibrations may provide an effective intervention for preventing falls in healthy elderly walkers.
doi:10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.05.014
PMCID: PMC3978195  PMID: 22739049
gait; aged; accidental falls; stochastic resonance
2.  Lower Limb Joint Kinetics During Moderately Sloped Running 
Journal of Athletic Training  2010;45(1):16-21.
Abstract
Context:
Knowledge of the kinetic changes that occur during sloped running is important in understanding the adaptive gait-control mechanisms at work and can provide additional information about the poorly understood relationship between injury and changes in kinetic forces in the lower extremity. A study of these potential kinetic changes merits consideration, because training and return-to-activity programs are potentially modifiable factors for tissue stress and injury risk.
Objective:
To contribute further to the understanding of hill running by quantifying the 3-dimensional alterations in joint kinetics during moderately sloped decline, level, and incline running in a group of healthy runners.
Design:
Crossover study.
Setting:
Three-dimensional motion analysis laboratory.
Patients or Other Participants:
Nineteen healthy young runners/joggers (age  =  25.3 ± 2.5 years).
Intervention(s):
Participants ran at 3.13 m/s on a treadmill under the following 3 different running-surface slope conditions: 4° decline, level, and 4° incline.
Main Outcome Measure(s):
Lower extremity joint moments and powers and the 3 components of the ground reaction force.
Results:
Moderate changes in running-surface slope had a minimal effect on ankle, knee, and hip joint kinetics when velocity was held constant. Only changes in knee power absorption (increased with decline-slope running) and hip power (increased generation on incline-slope running and increased absorption on decline-slope running in early stance) were noted. We observed an increase only in the impact peak of the vertical ground reaction force component during decline-slope running, whereas the nonvertical components displayed no differences.
Conclusions:
Running style modifications associated with running on moderate slopes did not manifest as changes in 3-dimensional joint moments or in the active peaks of the ground reaction force. Our data indicate that running on level and moderately inclined slopes appears to be a safe component of training regimens and return-to-run protocols after injury.
doi:10.4085/1062-6050-45.1.16
PMCID: PMC2808749  PMID: 20064043
biomechanics; decline running; incline running; joint moments; joint power
3.  Reduced Quadriceps Activation After Lumbar Paraspinal Fatiguing Exercise 
Journal of Athletic Training  2006;41(1):79-86.
Context: Although poor paraspinal muscle endurance has been associated with less quadriceps activation (QA) in persons with a history of low back pain, no authors have addressed the acute neuromuscular response after lumbar paraspinal fatiguing exercise.
Objective: To compare QA after lumbar paraspinal fatiguing exercise in healthy individuals and those with a history of low back pain.
Design: A 2 × 4 repeated-measures, time-series design.
Setting: Exercise and Sport Injury Laboratory.
Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen volunteers participated (9 males, 7 females; 8 controls and 8 with a history of low back pain; age = 24.1 ± 3.1 years, height = 173.4 ± 7.1 cm, mass = 72.4 ± 12.1 kg).
Intervention(s): Subjects performed 3 sets of isometric lumbar paraspinal fatiguing muscle contractions. Exercise sets continued until the desired shift in lumbar paraspinal electromyographic median power frequency was observed. Baseline QA was compared with QA after each exercise set.
Main Outcome Measure(s): An electric burst was superimposed while subjects performed a maximal quadriceps contraction. We used the central activation ratio to calculate QA = (FMVIC/[FMVIC + FBurst])* 100, where F = force and MVIC = maximal voluntary isometric contractions. Quadriceps electromyographic activity was collected at the same time as QA measurements to permit calculation of median frequency during MVIC.
Results: Average QA decreased from baseline (87.4% ± 8.2%) after the first (84.5% ± 10.5%), second (81.4% ± 11.0%), and third (78.2% ± 12.7%) fatiguing exercise sets. On average, the group with a history of low back pain showed significantly more QA than controls. No significant change in quadriceps median frequency was noted during the quadriceps MVICs.
Conclusions: The quadriceps muscle group was inhibited after lumbar paraspinal fatiguing exercise in the absence of quadriceps fatigue. This effect may be different for people with a history of low back pain compared with healthy controls.
PMCID: PMC1421484  PMID: 16619099
superimposed burst technique; quadriceps muscle inhibition; low back pain
4.  Quadriceps Inhibition After Repetitive Lumbar Extension Exercise in Persons With a History of Low Back Pain 
Journal of Athletic Training  2006;41(3):264-269.
Context: A neuromuscular relationship exists between the lumbar extensor and quadriceps muscles during fatiguing exercise. However, this relationship may be different for persons with low back pain (LBP).
Objective: To compare quadriceps inhibition after isometric, fatiguing lumbar extension exercise between persons with a history of LBP and control subjects.
Design: A 2 × 3 factorial, repeated-measures, time-series design with independent variables of group (persons with a history of LBP, controls) and time (baseline, postexercise set 1, postexercise set 2).
Setting: University research laboratory.
Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five subjects with a history of LBP were matched by sex, height, and mass to 25 healthy control subjects.
Intervention(s): Electromyography median frequency indexed lumbar paraspinal muscular fatigue while subjects performed 2 sets of isometric lumbar extension exercise. Subjects exercised until a 15% downward shift in median frequency for the first set and a 25% shift for the second set were demonstrated.
Main Outcome Measure(s): Knee extension force was measured while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction. During this maximal effort, a percutaneous electric stimulus was applied to the quadriceps, causing a transient, supramaximal increase in force output. We used the ratio between the 2 forces to estimate quadriceps inhibition. Quadriceps electromyographic activity was recorded during the maximal contractions to compare median frequencies over time.
Results: Both groups exhibited significantly increased quadriceps inhibition after the first (12.6% ± 10.0%, P < .001) and second (15.2% ± 9.7%, P < .001) exercise sets compared with baseline (9.6% ± 9.3%). However, quadriceps inhibition was not different between groups.
Conclusions: Persons with a history of LBP do not appear to be any more or less vulnerable to quadriceps inhibition after fatiguing lumbar extension exercise.
PMCID: PMC1569566  PMID: 17043693
superimposed burst technique; neuromuscular activity; knee
5.  Lumbopelvic Joint Manipulation and Quadriceps Activation of People With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome 
Journal of Athletic Training  2012;47(1):24-31.
Context:
Quadriceps weakness and inhibition are impairments associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Lumbopelvic joint manipulation has been shown to improve quadriceps force output and inhibition, but the duration of the effect is unknown.
Objective:
To determine whether quadriceps strength and activation are increased and maintained for 1 hour after high-grade or low-grade joint mobilization or manipulation applied at the lumbopelvic region in people with PFPS.
Design:
Randomized controlled clinical trial.
Setting:
University laboratory.
Patients or Other Participants:
Forty-eight people with PFPS (age = 24.6±8.9 years, height = 174.3 ± 11.2 cm, mass = 78.4 ± 16.8 kg) participated.
Intervention(s):
Participants were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: lumbopelvic joint manipulation (grade V), side-lying lumbar midrange flexion and extension passive range of motion (grade II) for 1 minute, or prone extension on the elbows for 3 minutes.
Main Outcome Measure(s):
Quadriceps force and activation were measured using the burst superimposition technique during a seated isometric knee extension task. A 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to compare changes in quadriceps force and activation among groups over time (before intervention and at 0, 20, 40, and 60 minutes after intervention).
Results:
We found no differences in quadriceps force output (F5,33,101,18 = 0.65, P = .67) or central activation ratio (F4.84,92.03 = 0.38, P= .86) values among groups after intervention. When groups were pooled, we found differences across time for quadriceps force (F2.66,101.18 = 5.03, P = .004) and activation (F2.42,92.03 = 3.85, P = .02). Quadriceps force was not different at 0 minutes after intervention (t40 = 1.68, P = .10), but it decreased at 20 (t40 = 2.16, P = .04), 40 (t40 = 2.87, P = .01) and 60 (t40 = 3.04, P = .004) minutes after intervention. All groups demonstrated decreased quadriceps activation at 0 minutes after intervention (t40 = 4.17, P <.001), but subsequent measures were not different from preintervention levels (t40 range, 1.53–1.83, P >.09).
Conclusions:
Interventions directed at the lumbopelvic region did not have immediate effects on quadriceps force output or activation. Muscle fatigue might have contributed to decreased force output and activation over 1 hour of testing.
PMCID: PMC3418111  PMID: 22488227
force output; knee pain; manual therapy; muscle activation
6.  Jogging Kinematics After Lumbar Paraspinal Muscle Fatigue 
Journal of Athletic Training  2009;44(5):475-481.
Abstract
Context:
Isolated lumbar paraspinal muscle fatigue causes lower extremity and postural control deficits.
Objective:
To describe the change in body position during gait after fatiguing lumbar extension exercises in persons with recurrent episodes of low back pain compared with healthy controls.
Design:
Case-control study.
Setting:
Motion analysis laboratory.
Patients or Other Participants:
Twenty-five recreationally active participants with a history of recurrent episodes of low back pain, matched by sex, height, and mass with 25 healthy controls.
Intervention(s):
We measured 3-dimensional lower extremity and trunk kinematics before and after fatiguing isometric lumbar paraspinal exercise.
Main Outcome Measure(s):
Measurements were taken while participants jogged on a custom-built treadmill surrounded by a 10-camera motion analysis system.
Results:
Group-by-time interactions were observed for lumbar lordosis and trunk angles (P < .05). A reduced lumbar spine extension angle was noted, reflecting a loss of lordosis and an increase in trunk flexion angle, indicating increased forward trunk lean, in healthy controls after fatiguing lumbar extension exercise. In contrast, persons with a history of recurrent low back pain exhibited a slight increase in spine extension, indicating a slightly more lordotic position of the lumbar spine, and a decrease in trunk flexion angles after fatiguing exercise. Regardless of group, participants experienced, on average, greater peak hip extension after lumbar paraspinal fatigue.
Conclusions:
Small differences in response may represent a necessary adaptation used by persons with recurrent low back pain to preserve gait function by stabilizing the spine and preventing inappropriate trunk and lumbar spine positioning.
doi:10.4085/1062-6050-44.5.475
PMCID: PMC2742456  PMID: 19771285
gait analysis; spine
7.  Contribution of Hamstring Fatigue to Quadriceps Inhibition Following Lumbar Extension Exercise 
The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of hamstrings and quadriceps fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise. Regression models were calculated consisting of the outcome variable: quadriceps inhibition and predictor variables: change in EMG median frequency in the quadriceps and hamstrings during lumbar fatiguing exercise. Twenty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were matched by gender, height and mass to 25 healthy controls. Subjects performed two sets of fatiguing isometric lumbar extension exercise until mild (set 1) and moderate (set 2) fatigue of the lumbar paraspinals. Quadriceps and hamstring EMG median frequency were measured while subjects performed fatiguing exercise. A burst of electrical stimuli was superimposed while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction to estimate quadriceps inhibition after each exercise set. Results indicate the change in hamstring median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the exercise sets in the history of low back pain group only. Change in quadriceps median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the first exercise set in the control group only. In conclusion, persons with a history of low back pain whose quadriceps become inhibited following lumbar paraspinal exercise may be adapting to the fatigue by using their hamstring muscles more than controls.
Key PointsA neuromuscular relationship between the lumbar paraspinals and quadriceps while performing lumbar extension exercise may be influenced by hamstring muscle fatigue.QI following lumbar extension exercise in persons with a history of LBP group may involve significant contribution from the hamstring muscle group.More hamstring muscle contribution may be a necessary adaptation in the history of LBP group due to weaker and more fatigable lumbar extensors.
PMCID: PMC3818676  PMID: 24198683
Superimposed burst technique; electromyography; spectral median frequency; correlation and regression; low back pain

Results 1-7 (7)