PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
author:("Jiang, being")
1.  Targeting the Biophysical Properties of the Myeloma Initiating Cell Niches: A Pharmaceutical Synergism Analysis Using Multi-Scale Agent-Based Modeling 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(1):e85059.
Multiple myeloma, the second most common hematological cancer, is currently incurable due to refractory disease relapse and development of multiple drug resistance. We and others recently established the biophysical model that myeloma initiating (stem) cells (MICs) trigger the stiffening of their niches via SDF-1/CXCR4 paracrine; The stiffened niches then promote the colonogenesis of MICs and protect them from drug treatment. In this work we examined in silico the pharmaceutical potential of targeting MIC niche stiffness to facilitate cytotoxic chemotherapies. We first established a multi-scale agent-based model using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach to recapitulate the niche stiffness centric, pro-oncogenetic positive feedback loop between MICs and myeloma-associated bone marrow stromal cells (MBMSCs), and investigated the effects of such intercellular chemo-physical communications on myeloma development. Then we used AMD3100 (to interrupt the interactions between MICs and their stroma) and Bortezomib (a recently developed novel therapeutic agent) as representative drugs to examine if the biophysical properties of myeloma niches are drugable. Results showed that our model recaptured the key experimental observation that the MBMSCs were more sensitive to SDF-1 secreted by MICs, and provided stiffer niches for these initiating cells and promoted their proliferation and drug resistance. Drug synergism analysis suggested that AMD3100 treatment undermined the capability of MICs to modulate the bone marrow microenvironment, and thus re-sensitized myeloma to Bortezomib treatments. This work is also the first attempt to virtually visualize in 3D the dynamics of the bone marrow stiffness during myeloma development. In summary, we established a multi-scale model to facilitate the translation of the niche-stiffness centric myeloma model as well as experimental observations to possible clinical applications. We concluded that targeting the biophysical properties of stem cell niches is of high clinical potential since it may re-sensitize tumor initiating cells to chemotherapies and reduce risks of cancer relapse.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085059
PMCID: PMC3903473  PMID: 24475036
2.  Developing a multiscale, multi-resolution agent-based brain tumor model by graphics processing units 
Multiscale agent-based modeling (MABM) has been widely used to simulate Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and its progression. At the intracellular level, the MABM approach employs a system of ordinary differential equations to describe quantitatively specific intracellular molecular pathways that determine phenotypic switches among cells (e.g. from migration to proliferation and vice versa). At the intercellular level, MABM describes cell-cell interactions by a discrete module. At the tissue level, partial differential equations are employed to model the diffusion of chemoattractants, which are the input factors of the intracellular molecular pathway. Moreover, multiscale analysis makes it possible to explore the molecules that play important roles in determining the cellular phenotypic switches that in turn drive the whole GBM expansion. However, owing to limited computational resources, MABM is currently a theoretical biological model that uses relatively coarse grids to simulate a few cancer cells in a small slice of brain cancer tissue. In order to improve this theoretical model to simulate and predict actual GBM cancer progression in real time, a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel computing algorithm was developed and combined with the multi-resolution design to speed up the MABM. The simulated results demonstrated that the GPU-based, multi-resolution and multiscale approach can accelerate the previous MABM around 30-fold with relatively fine grids in a large extracellular matrix. Therefore, the new model has great potential for simulating and predicting real-time GBM progression, if real experimental data are incorporated.
doi:10.1186/1742-4682-8-46
PMCID: PMC3312859  PMID: 22176732
3.  Using Granger-Geweke causality model to evaluate the effective connectivity of primary motor cortex (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA) and cerebellum 
Currently, Granger-Geweke causality models have been widely applied to investigate the dynamic direction relationships among brain regions. In a previous study, we have found that the right hand finger-tapping task can produce relatively reliable brain response. As an extension of our previous study, we developed an algorithm based on the classical Granger-Geweke causality model to further investigate the effective connectivity of three brain regions (left primary motor cortex (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA) and right cerebellum) that showed the most robust brain activations. Our computational results not only confirm the strong linear feedback among SMA, M1 and right cerebellum, but also demonstrate that M1 is the hub of these three regions indicated by the anatomy research. Moreover, the model predicts the high intermediate node density existing in the area between SMA and M1, which will stimulate the imaging experimentalists to carry out new experiments to validate this postulation.
doi:10.4236/jbise.2010.39115
PMCID: PMC2991070  PMID: 21113332
Granger-Geweke causality model; time series; Computational Neuroscience; fMRI; finger-tapping; hand movement; Math modeling

Results 1-3 (3)