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1.  Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Older Adults: Results from the Cardiovascular Health Study 
Atherosclerosis  2009;209(2):528-532.
Objective
To examine associations between lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) antigen level (mass) and enzymatic activity (activity) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older adults.
Methods
We examined associations of Lp-PLA2 mass and activity with incident myocardial infarction (MI; n=508), stroke (n= 565) and CVD death (n=665) using Cox regressions adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity and CVD risk factors in 3,949 older adults, aged ≥ 65 years at baseline, from the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS).
Results
Lp-PLA2 was associated with incident CVD events in these older adults. Hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for highest versus lowest tertiles of Lp-PLA2 mass were 1.49 (1.19–1.85) for MI, 1.21 (0.98–1.49) for stroke and 1.11 (0.92–1.33) for CVD death. The highest tertile of Lp-PLA2 activity was associated with MI (1.36; 1.09–1.70) and CVD death (1.23; 1.02–1.50). Combined Lp-PLA2 tertile 3 and CRP >3mg/l, compared to Lp-PLA2 tertile 1 and CRP <1 mg/l, was associated with MI (2.29; 1.49–3.52) for Lp-PLA2 mass and MI (1.66; 1.10–2.51) and CVD death (1.57; 1.08–2.26) for activity. For MI, both mass and activity added excess risk to elevated CRP alone (~20% excess risk) and activity added excess risk for CVD death (~12%).
Conclusion
Lp-PLA2 mass and activity were associated with incident CVD events in older adults in CHS. Lp-PLA2 and CRP were independent and additive in prediction of events. While associations were modest, these results support further exploration of Lp-PLA2 to identify older individuals at risk for CVD.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.09.021
PMCID: PMC2846186  PMID: 19804884
Epidemiology; Inflammation; Cardiovascular diseases; Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2
2.  Associations of Inflammatory Markers with Coronary Artery Calcification: Results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Atherosclerosis  2009;209(1):226-229.
Objective
Inflammatory markers predict coronary heart disease (CHD). However, associations with coronary artery calcium (CAC), a marker of subclinical CHD, are not established.
Methods
We examined cross-sectional associations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fibrinogen with CAC presence (Agatston score > 0 by computed tomography) in 6,783 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants.
Results
In all participants, those in the highest, compared to lowest, quartile of CRP had a relative risk (RR, 95% confidence interval) of 1.13 (1.06-1.19; p<0.01) for CAC in age, sex and ethnicity adjusted models. For highest versus lowest quartiles, relative risks were 1.22 (1.15-1.30; p<0.01) for IL-6 and 1.18 (1.11-1.24; p<0.01) for fibrinogen. Adjusting for CHD risk factors (smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, obesity and dyslipidemia) attenuated RRs. RRs for CAC were 1.05 (0.99-1.12; p=0.63) for CRP, 1.12 (1.06-1.20; p<0.01) for IL-6 and 1.09 (1.02-1.16; p=0.01) for fibrinogen in multivariable adjusted models. Results were similar for men and women and across ethnic groups.
Conclusion
Inflammatory markers were weakly associated with CAC presence and burden in MESA. Our data support the hypothesis that inflammatory biomarkers and CAC reflect distinct pathophysiology.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.08.037
PMCID: PMC2830357  PMID: 19766217
Atherosclerosis; Calcium; Inflammation; Population
3.  Associations of Pentraxin 3 with Cardiovascular Disease and All Cause Death: The Cardiovascular Health Study 
Objective
We examined associations of pentraxin 3 (PTX3), a vascular inflammation marker, with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all cause death.
Methods and Results
1,583 Cardiovascular Health Study participants free of prevalent CVD were included. Non-exclusive case groups were angina (n=476), myocardial infarction (MI; n=237), stroke (n=310), CVD death (n=282) and all cause death (n=772). 535 participants had no events. PTX3 levels were higher in those with subclinical CVD (1.90 ± 1.89 ng/ml) than those without (1.71 ± 1.88 ng/ml; p=0.001). Using Cox regression adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity, a standard deviation increase in PTX3 (1.89 ng/ml) was associated with CVD death (hazard ratio 1.11; 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.21) and all cause death (1.08; 1.02–1.15). PTX3 was not associated with angina (1.09; 0.98–1.20), MI (0.96; 0.81–1.12) or stroke (1.06; 0.95–1.18). Adding C-reactive protein (CRP) or CVD risk factors to the models had no significant effects on associations.
Conclusions
In these older adults, PTX3 was associated with CVD and all cause death independent of CRP and CVD risk factors. PTX3 likely reflects different aspects of inflammation than CRP and may provide insight into vascular health in aging and chronic diseases of aging that lead to death.
doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.108.178947
PMCID: PMC2661204  PMID: 19164811
Cardiovascular Diseases; Epidemiology; Inflammation; Mortality; Pentraxin 3
4.  A Multi-Ethnic Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in Over 100,000 Subjects Identifies 23 Fibrinogen-Associated Loci but no Strong Evidence of a Causal Association between Circulating Fibrinogen and Cardiovascular Disease 
Sabater-Lleal, Maria | Huang, Jie | Chasman, Daniel | Naitza, Silvia | Dehghan, Abbas | Johnson, Andrew D | Teumer, Alexander | Reiner, Alex P | Folkersen, Lasse | Basu, Saonli | Rudnicka, Alicja R | Trompet, Stella | Mälarstig, Anders | Baumert, Jens | Bis, Joshua C. | Guo, Xiuqing | Hottenga, Jouke J | Shin, So-Youn | Lopez, Lorna M | Lahti, Jari | Tanaka, Toshiko | Yanek, Lisa R | Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine | Wilson, James F | Navarro, Pau | Huffman, Jennifer E | Zemunik, Tatijana | Redline, Susan | Mehra, Reena | Pulanic, Drazen | Rudan, Igor | Wright, Alan F | Kolcic, Ivana | Polasek, Ozren | Wild, Sarah H | Campbell, Harry | Curb, J David | Wallace, Robert | Liu, Simin | Eaton, Charles B. | Becker, Diane M. | Becker, Lewis C. | Bandinelli, Stefania | Räikkönen, Katri | Widen, Elisabeth | Palotie, Aarno | Fornage, Myriam | Green, David | Gross, Myron | Davies, Gail | Harris, Sarah E | Liewald, David C | Starr, John M | Williams, Frances M.K. | Grant, P.J. | Spector, Timothy D. | Strawbridge, Rona J | Silveira, Angela | Sennblad, Bengt | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Franco, Oscar H | Hofman, Albert | van Dongen, Jenny | Willemsen, G | Boomsma, Dorret I | Yao, Jie | Jenny, Nancy Swords | Haritunians, Talin | McKnight, Barbara | Lumley, Thomas | Taylor, Kent D | Rotter, Jerome I | Psaty, Bruce M | Peters, Annette | Gieger, Christian | Illig, Thomas | Grotevendt, Anne | Homuth, Georg | Völzke, Henry | Kocher, Thomas | Goel, Anuj | Franzosi, Maria Grazia | Seedorf, Udo | Clarke, Robert | Steri, Maristella | Tarasov, Kirill V | Sanna, Serena | Schlessinger, David | Stott, David J | Sattar, Naveed | Buckley, Brendan M | Rumley, Ann | Lowe, Gordon D | McArdle, Wendy L | Chen, Ming-Huei | Tofler, Geoffrey H | Song, Jaejoon | Boerwinkle, Eric | Folsom, Aaron R. | Rose, Lynda M. | Franco-Cereceda, Anders | Teichert, Martina | Ikram, M Arfan | Mosley, Thomas H | Bevan, Steve | Dichgans, Martin | Rothwell, Peter M. | Sudlow, Cathie L M | Hopewell, Jemma C. | Chambers, John C. | Saleheen, Danish | Kooner, Jaspal S. | Danesh, John | Nelson, Christopher P | Erdmann, Jeanette | Reilly, Muredach P. | Kathiresan, Sekar | Schunkert, Heribert | Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel | Ferrucci, Luigi | Eriksson, Johan G | Jacobs, David | Deary, Ian J | Soranzo, Nicole | Witteman, Jacqueline CM | de Geus, Eco JC | Tracy, Russell P. | Hayward, Caroline | Koenig, Wolfgang | Cucca, Francesco | Jukema, J Wouter | Eriksson, Per | Seshadri, Sudha | Markus, Hugh S. | Watkins, Hugh | Samani, Nilesh J | Wallaschofski, Henri | Smith, Nicholas L. | Tregouet, David | Ridker, Paul M. | Tang, Weihong | Strachan, David P. | Hamsten, Anders | O’Donnell, Christopher J.
Circulation  2013;128(12):10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.002251.
Background
Estimates of the heritability of plasma fibrinogen concentration, an established predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), range from 34 to 50%. Genetic variants so far identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies only explain a small proportion (< 2%) of its variation.
Methods and Results
We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 GWA studies, including more than 90,000 subjects of European ancestry, the first GWA meta-analysis of fibrinogen levels in 7 African Americans studies totaling 8,289 samples, and a GWA study in Hispanic-Americans totaling 1,366 samples. Evaluation for association of SNPs with clinical outcomes included a total of 40,695 cases and 85,582 controls for coronary artery disease (CAD), 4,752 cases and 24,030 controls for stroke, and 3,208 cases and 46,167 controls for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Overall, we identified 24 genome-wide significant (P<5×10−8) independent signals in 23 loci, including 15 novel associations, together accounting for 3.7% of plasma fibrinogen variation. Gene-set enrichment analysis highlighted key roles in fibrinogen regulation for the three structural fibrinogen genes and pathways related to inflammation, adipocytokines and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone signaling. Whereas lead SNPs in a few loci were significantly associated with CAD, the combined effect of all 24 fibrinogen-associated lead SNPs was not significant for CAD, stroke or VTE.
Conclusion
We identify 23 robustly associated fibrinogen loci, 15 of which are new. Clinical outcome analysis of these loci does not support a causal relationship between circulating levels of fibrinogen and CAD, stroke or VTE.
doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.002251
PMCID: PMC3842025  PMID: 23969696
Fibrinogen; cardiovascular disease; genome-wide association study
5.  Intakes of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and fish in relation to measurements of subclinical atherosclerosis 
Background
Data on the relations of different types of fish meals and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) with measures of atherosclerosis are sparse.
Objective
We examined intakes of long-chain n-3 PUFAs and fish in relation to clinical measures of subclinical atherosclerosis.
Design
A cross-sectional study was conducted in 5,488 multiethnic adults aged 45–84 years and free of clinical cardiovascular disease. Diet was assessed using self-administered food frequency questionnaires. Subclinical atherosclerosis was determined by common carotid intima-media thickness (cCIMT, >80th percentile), internal CIMT (iCIMT, >80th percentile), coronary artery calcium score (CAC, >0) or ankle-brachial index (ABI, <0.90), respectively.
Results
After adjustment for potential confounders, intakes of long-chain n-3 PUFAs and non-fried (broiled, steamed, baked or raw) fish were inversely related to subclinical atherosclerosis determined by cCIMT but not iCIMT, CAC or ABI. The multivariable odds ratio comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of dietary exposures in relation to subclinical atherosclerosis determined by cCIMT was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.86; p for trend<0.01) for n-3 PUFA intake, 0.80 (95% CI: 0.64, 1.01; p=0.054) for non-fried fish and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.10; p=0.33) for fried fish consumption.
Conclusions
This study indicates that dietary intake of long-chain n-3 PUFAs or non-fried fish is associated with lower prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis classified by cCIMT although significant changes in iCIMT, CAC and ABI were not observed. Our findings also suggest that the association of fish and atherosclerosis may vary depending on the type of fish meal consumed and the measures of atherosclerosis.
PMCID: PMC4151325  PMID: 18842801
long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids; fish; fish oil; biomarker; subclinical atherosclerosis; multi-ethnicities
6.  Current employment status, occupational category, occupational hazard exposure, and job stress in relation to telomere length: The Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) 
Objective
Telomere length has been proposed as a biomarker of cell senescence, which is associated with a wide array of adverse health outcomes. While work is a major determinant of health, few studies have investigated the association of telomere length with various dimensions of occupation. Accelerated cellular aging could be a common pathway linking occupational exposure to several health outcomes.
Methods
Leukocyte telomere length was assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) in a community-based sample of 981 individuals (age: 45–84 years old). Questionnaires were used to collect information on current employment status, current or main occupation before retirement, and job strain. The O*NET (Occupational Resource Network) database was linked to the questionnaire data to create 5 exposure measures: physical activity on the job, physical hazard exposure, interpersonal stressors, job control, and job demands. Linear regression was used to estimate associations of occupational characteristics with telomere lengths after adjustment for age, sex, race, socioeconomic position, and several behavioral risk factors.
Results
There were no mean differences in telomere lengths across current employment status, occupational category, job strain categories or levels of most O*NET exposure measures. There was also no evidence that being in lower status occupational categories or being exposed to higher levels of adverse physical or psychosocial exposures accelerated the association between age and telomere shortening.
Conclusions
Cellular aging as reflected by shorter telomeres does not appear to be an important pathway linking occupation to various health outcomes.
doi:10.1136/oemed-2012-101296
PMCID: PMC4068015  PMID: 23686115
7.  n-3 and n-6 Fatty acids are independently associated with lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
The British journal of nutrition  2013;110(9):1664-1671.
Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an independent risk factor for CVD and has been proposed as a marker of vascular inflammation. Polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids (FA) and several n-6 FA are known to suppress inflammation and may influence Lp-PLA2 mass and activity. The associations of n-3 and n-6 plasma FA with Lp-PLA2 mass and activity were analysed using linear regression analysis in 2246 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis; statistical adjustments were made to control for body mass, inflammation, lipids, diabetes, and additional clinical and demographic factors. Lp-PLA2 mass and activity were significantly lower in participants with the higher n-3 FA EPA (β = −4·72, P<0·001; β = −1·53; P=0·023) and DHA levels (β = −4·47, β = −1·87; both P<0·001). Those in the highest quintiles of plasma EPA and DHA showed 12·71 and 19·15 ng/ml lower Lp-PLA2 mass and 5·7 and 8·90 nmol/min per ml lower Lp-PLA2 activity than those in the first quintiles, respectively. In addition, lower Lp-PLA2 mass and activity were associated with higher levels of n-6 arachidonic acid (β = −1·63, β = −1·30; both P<0·001), while γ-linolenic acid was negatively associated with activity (β = −27·7, P=0·027). Lp-PLA2 mass was significantly higher in participants with greater plasma levels of n-6 linoleic (β = 0·828, P=0·011) and dihomo-γ-linolenic acids (β = 4·17, P=0·002). Based on their independent associations with Lp-PLA2 mass and activity, certain n-3 and n-6 FA may have additional influences on CVD risk. Intervention studies are warranted to assess whether these macronutrients may directly influence Lp-PLA2 expression or activity.
doi:10.1017/S0007114513000949
PMCID: PMC4060439  PMID: 23551952
Fatty acids; n-3; Atherosclerosis; Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase; Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2
8.  13-Year Long-Term Associations between Changes in Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Changes in Fibrinogen Levels: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study 
Atherosclerosis  2012;226(1):214-219.
Objective
Cross-sectional and prospective studies have linked cardiovascular events and traditional risk factors (TRFs) with higher plasma fibrinogen levels. In a young cohort, we sought to determine longitudinal associations between changes in/development of TRFs and fibrinogen levels over 13 years.
Methods
We included 2525 adults from the CARDIA study, aged 25-37 with fibrinogen and TRFs measured at year 7 (study baseline; 1992-1993); and year 20 (follow-up). Multiple linear regressions were used to compare mean changes in fibrinogen to TRFs.
Results
Mean fibrinogen increased by 71mg/dL vs. 70mg/dL (p=NS) in black vs. white men, and 78mg/dL vs. 68mg/dL (p<0.05) in black vs. white women, respectively over 13 years. After multivariable adjustments, fibrinogen generally rose with increasing BMI (p<0.001; all sex/race groups), LDL-cholesterol, log triglycerides and diastolic blood pressure; and fell with increasing HDL-cholesterol and physical activity. 13-year increase in fibrinogen for persons who quit smoking or became non-obese were comparable (p=NS) to that of never-smokers and never-obese persons.
Conclusions
Among young black and white men and women with few baseline cardiovascular risk factors, fibrinogen tracked longitudinally with changes in TRFs over 13 years through middle-age. There was a strong inverse longitudinal relationship between modifiable risk factors (weight loss/smoking cessation) and 13-year change in fibrinogen. Our study helps provide some insight into the role of fibrinogen as a disease marker in the associations between fibrinogen and CVD.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2012.10.043
PMCID: PMC3529787  PMID: 23177973
Fibrinogen; risk factors; cardiovascular disease prevention; obesity; smoking; sex; race
9.  Decreased Naive and Increased Memory CD4+ T Cells Are Associated with Subclinical Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e71498.
Background
Adaptive immunity has been implicated in atherosclerosis in animal models and small clinical studies. Whether chronic immune activation is associated with atherosclerosis in otherwise healthy individuals remains underexplored. We hypothesized that activation of adaptive immune responses, as reflected by higher proportions of circulating CD4+ memory cells and lower proportions of naive cells, would be associated with subclinical atherosclerosis.
Methods and Findings
We examined cross-sectional relationships of circulating CD4+ naive and memory T cells with biomarkers of inflammation, serologies, and subclinical atherosclerosis in 912 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Circulating CD4+ naive cells were higher in women than men and decreased with age (all p-values <0.0001). European-Americans had higher levels of naive cells and lower levels of memory cells compared with African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans (all p-values ≤0.0005). Lower naive/higher memory cells were associated with interleukin-6 levels. In multivariate models, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and H. Pylori titers were strongly associated with higher memory and lower naive cells (all p-values <0.05). Higher memory cells were associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) level in the overall population [β-Coefficient (95% confidence interval (CI))  = 0.20 (0.03, 0.37)]. Memory and naive (inversely) cells were associated with common carotid artery intimal media thickness (CC IMT) in European-Americans [memory: β =  0.02 (0.006, 0.04); naive: β = −0.02 (−0.004, −0.03)].
Conclusions
These results demonstrate that the degree of chronic adaptive immune activation is associated with both CAC and CC IMT in otherwise healthy individuals, consistent with the known role of CD4+ T cells, and with innate immunity (inflammation), in atherosclerosis. These data are also consistent with the hypothesis that immunosenescence accelerates chronic diseases by putting a greater burden on the innate immune system, and suggest the importance of prospective studies and research into strategies to modulate adaptive immune activation in chronic disease states such as atherosclerosis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071498
PMCID: PMC3751895  PMID: 24009662
10.  Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Genetic Polymorphisms, HDL Cholesterol, and Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Atherosclerosis  2008;200(2):359-367.
The cholesteryl ester transport protein (CETP) plays a key role in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Genetic variants that alter CETP activity and concentration may cause significant alterations in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration; however, controversies remain about whether these genetic variants are associated with atherosclerosis. We genotyped the CETP R451Q, A373P, -629C/A, Taq1B, and -2505C/A polymorphisms in a cohort of Caucasian, Chinese, African-American, and Hispanic individuals within the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Genotypes were examined in relationship to HDL-C, CETP activity, CETP concentration, and three measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD): coronary artery calcium (CAC) measured by fast CT scanning, and carotid intimal-medial thickness (IMT) and carotid artery plaque, measured by ultrasonography. Carriers of the 451Q and 373P alleles have significantly higher CETP concentration (22.4% and 19.5%, respectively; p<0.001) and activity (13.1% and 9.4%, respectively; p<0.01) and lower HDL-C (5.6% and 6.0%, respectively; p<0.05). The minor alleles of the R451Q and A373P polymorphisms are associated with the presence of CAC, even after adjusting for CVD risk factors and HDL-C (p=0.006 and p=0.01, respectively). The R451Q polymorphism is also associated with presence of carotid artery plaque (p=0.036). Neither polymorphism is associated with common or internal carotid IMT. We confirmed that the -629A, Taq1B B2, and -2505A alleles are significantly associated with lower CETP concentration (20.8%, 25.0%, and 23.7%, respectively; p<0.001) and activity (14.8%, 19.8%, and 18.4%, respectively; p<0.001) and higher HDL-C concentration (9.7%, 11.5%, and 10.4%, respectively; p<0.01). However, we did not find any associations between these non-coding polymorphisms and subclinical CVD.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2007.12.038
PMCID: PMC3612981  PMID: 18243217
CETP; CVD; HDL; MESA
11.  Association of Endothelial and Oxidative Stress with Metabolic Syndrome and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Objectives
A cluster of metabolic abnormalities termed metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction and oxidative internal milieu. We examined whether the association of MetS with subclinical atherosclerosis is explained by biomarkers of endothelial damage and oxidative stress.
Methods
MESA is a population based study of 45-84 year old individuals of four US ethnicities without clinical cardiovascular disease. A random sample of 997 MESA participants had data on the following biomarkers: von Willebrand Factor, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM1), CD40 ligand, soluble thrombomodulin, E-selectin, and oxidized LDL (oxLDL). We examined whether the associations of MetS with B-mode ultrasound-defined common and internal carotid intimal medial thickness (IMT) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) measured using computerized tomography were explained by the biomarkers using multiple regression methods.
Results
MetS was associated with higher levels of each of the biomarkers (p<0.001, CD40L suggestive association p=0.004), with greater IMT (p<0.001), and with greater extent of CAC in those in whom CAC was detectable (p=0.01). The association of MetS with measures of subclinical atherosclerosis remained unchanged after adjustment for the biomarkers. After adjusting for MetS, oxLDL was suggestively associated with greater prevalence of detectable CAC (p=0.005) and thicker internal carotid IMT (p=0.002), while sICAM-1was significantly associated with greater prevalence of detectable CAC (p=0.001).
Conclusions
The association of MetS with subclinical atherosclerosis was independent of its association with biomarkers of endothelial damage and oxidative stress, suggesting that metabolic abnormalities and oxidative endothelial damage may lead to atherosclerotic disease through distinct mechanisms.
doi:10.1038/ejcn.2011.47
PMCID: PMC3130805  PMID: 21505504
Metabolic syndrome; biomarkers; coronary artery atherosclerosis; carotid arteries
12.  Association between Baseline Kidney Function and Change in CRP: An Analysis of the Cardiovascular Health Study 
Nephron. Clinical Practice  2010;115(2):c114-c121.
Background
In cross-sectional analyses, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are inversely related to levels of kidney function. The relationship between kidney function and subsequent changes in CRP is unknown.
Methods
We studied 4,364 individuals from the Cardiovascular Health Study, a longitudinal cohort of community-dwelling older adults. Baseline eGFRcys was estimated using cystatin C. CRP was measured at baseline and after 3 and 7 years of follow-up; slopes of change in CRP were calculated.
Results
The mean (SD) age of the cohort was 72 (5.2) years; mean (SD) eGFRcys was 78.9 (18.4) ml/min/1.73 m2. The median (interquartile range IQR) baseline CRP was 2.39 (1.22, 4.33) mg/l; the median (IQR) yearly change in CRP was −0.0051 (−0.020 to 0.27) mg/l/year. After adjustment for demographic characteristics and the initial level of CRP, each standard deviation lower baseline eGFR was associated with a small and non-significant yearly increase in CRP (0.032 mg/l/year; 95% CI: −0.005 to 0.070, p = 0.094).
Conclusions
We did not find a relationship between eGFR and subsequent changes in CRP. The association between kidney function and CRP in cross-sectional analyses may reflect unmeasured confounding by atherosclerosis; alternatively, the burden of comorbidity and interval mortality in this population may have masked a stronger longitudinal association between kidney function and change in CRP. Further study in younger populations may clarify whether impaired kidney function leads to change in inflammation over time.
doi:10.1159/000312874
PMCID: PMC2892648  PMID: 20413990
Inflammation; Cystatin C; Kidney function; Epidemiology
13.  Comparative Validity of 3 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Prediction Scoring Models in a Multiethnic US Cohort 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2010;171(9):980-988.
Several models for estimating risk of incident diabetes in US adults are available. The authors aimed to determine the discriminative ability and calibration of published diabetes risk prediction models in a contemporary multiethnic cohort. Participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis without diabetes at baseline (2000–2002; n = 5,329) were followed for a median of 4.75 years. The predicted risk of diabetes was calculated using published models from the Framingham Offspring Study, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, and the San Antonio Heart Study. The mean age of participants was 61.6 years (standard deviation, 10.2); 29.3% were obese, 53.1% had hypertension, 34.9% had a family history of diabetes, 27.5% had high triglyceride levels, 33.8% had low high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and 15.3% had impaired fasting glucose. There were 446 incident cases of diabetes (fasting glucose level ≥126 mg/dL or initiation of antidiabetes medication use) diagnosed during follow-up. C statistics were 0.78, 0.84, and 0.83 for the Framingham, ARIC, and San Antonio risk prediction models, respectively. There were significant differences between observed and predicted diabetes risks (Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit chi-squared test for each model: P < 0.001). The recalibrated and best-fit models achieved sufficient goodness of fit (each P > 0.10). The Framingham, ARIC, and San Antonio models maintained high discriminative ability but required recalibration in a modern, multiethnic US cohort.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwq030
PMCID: PMC2877477  PMID: 20375194
cohort studies; diabetes mellitus; models, statistical; risk; validation studies as topic
14.  The Association of Statin Use and Statin Type on Cognitive Performance: Analysis of The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study 
Clinical cardiology  2010;33(5):280-288.
SUMMARY
Context
Statin use and type has been variably associated with impaired or improved cognitive performance.
Objective
To assess the association of statin use and type (lipophilic vs hydrophilic) and cognitive impairment
Design
Cross-sectional analysis of 24595 (7191 statin users and 17404 non-users) participants (age >45), from a population-based national cohort study (REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke) enrolled from January 2003-October 2008 with over-sampling from the southeastern Stroke Belt, and African Americans.
Main Outcomes
Statin use and type were documented in participants’ homes by a trained health professional. Cognitive performance was assessed with a prior validated instrument of global cognitive status (Six-Item Screener). Cognitive impairment was defined as a score of < 4. .
Results
Overall, an association of cognitive impairment and statin use was observed (8.6% of users vs 7.7% or non-users had cognitive impairment p=.014) but, after adjusting for variables known to be associated with cognition (age, gender, race, income, levels of education, and cardiovascular disease) the association was attenuated (OR 0.98, CI; 0.87;1.10). No association was observed between statin type (lipophilic vs hydrophilic) and cognition (OR 1.03, CI; 0.86;1.24), and there were no regional differences in cognitive impairment in statin users (8% in the stroke belt and 7.9% other regions p=0.63).
Conclusions
Statin use and type was marginally associated with cognitive impairment. After adjusting for known variables that affect cognition, no association was observed. No regional differences were observed. This large study found no evidence to support an association between statins and cognitive performance.
doi:10.1002/clc.20758
PMCID: PMC2925406  PMID: 20513066
Statins; Cognition
15.  Differential White Blood Cell Count and Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cross-Sectional and Prospective Studies 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(10):e13405.
Objective
Biological evidence suggests that inflammation might induce type 2 diabetes (T2D), and epidemiological studies have shown an association between higher white blood cell count (WBC) and T2D. However, the association has not been systematically investigated.
Research Design and Methods
Studies were identified through computer-based and manual searches. Previously unreported studies were sought through correspondence. 20 studies were identified (8,647 T2D cases and 85,040 non-cases). Estimates of the association of WBC with T2D were combined using random effects meta-analysis; sources of heterogeneity as well as presence of publication bias were explored.
Results
The combined relative risk (RR) comparing the top to bottom tertile of the WBC count was 1.61 (95% CI: 1.45; 1.79, p = 1.5*10−18). Substantial heterogeneity was present (I2 = 83%). For granulocytes the RR was 1.38 (95% CI: 1.17; 1.64, p = 1.5*10−4), for lymphocytes 1.26 (95% CI: 1.02; 1.56, p = 0.029), and for monocytes 0.93 (95% CI: 0.68; 1.28, p = 0.67) comparing top to bottom tertile. In cross-sectional studies, RR was 1.74 (95% CI: 1.49; 2.02, p = 7.7*10−13), while in cohort studies it was 1.48 (95% CI: 1.22; 1.79, p = 7.7*10−5). We assessed the impact of confounding in EPIC-Norfolk study and found that the age and sex adjusted HR of 2.19 (95% CI: 1.74; 2.75) was attenuated to 1.82 (95% CI: 1.45; 2.29) after further accounting for smoking, T2D family history, physical activity, education, BMI and waist circumference.
Conclusions
A raised WBC is associated with higher risk of T2D. The presence of publication bias and failure to control for all potential confounders in all studies means the observed association is likely an overestimate.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0013405
PMCID: PMC2956635  PMID: 20976133
16.  Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 and Risk of Congestive Heart Failure in Older Adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study 
Circulation. Heart failure  2009;2(5):429-436.
Background
Inflammation may be an etiologic factor in congestive heart failure (CHF). Lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an inflammation marker associated with vascular risk. One previous study showed an association of Lp-PLA2 activity with CHF risk, but there were only 94 CHF cases and Lp-PLA2 antigen, which is available clinically in the US, was not measured.
Methods and Results
We measured baseline Lp-PLA2 antigen and activity in 3991 men and women without baseline CHF or cardiovascular disease, participating in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a prospective observational study of adults ≥65 years old. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, sex, clinic site, race, LDL and HDL cholesterol, body-mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hypertension, smoking status, pack-years and diabetes were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident CHF. Further models adjusted for coronary disease events during follow up and C-reactive protein (CRP). 829 participants developed CHF over 12.1 years. Adjusted HRs for CHF with Lp-PLA2 in the fourth compared to first quartile, were 1.44 (CI 1.16–1.79) for Lp-PLA2 antigen and 1.06 (CI 0.84–1.32) for activity. Adjustment for incident coronary disease attenuated the HR for Lp-PLA2 antigen to 1.26 (CI 1.02–1.57), adjustment for CRP had minimal impact.
Conclusions
Lp-PLA2 antigen was associated with risk of future CHF in older people, independent of CHF and coronary risk factors, and partly mediated by coronary disease events. Further clinical and basic research is needed to better understand the role of Lp-PLA2 in CHF.
doi:10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.108.839613
PMCID: PMC2756764  PMID: 19808373
17.  Associations of Dietary Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Fish with Biomarkers of Inflammation and Endothelial Activation (From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]) 
The American journal of cardiology  2009;103(9):1238-1243.
Cardioprotective effects of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) and fish consumption have been observed. However, data on the specific associations of these dietary factors with inflammation and endothelial activation are sparse. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5,677 men and women from the MESA cohort including African Americans, Caucasians, Chinese and Hispanics, aged 45-84 years, and free of clinical cardiovascular disease. Dietary information was collected by self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable linear regression analyses were used to examine relations between intake of LC n-3 PUFAs, non-fried fish and fried fish and biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial activation. LC n-3 PUFA intakes were inversely associated with plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6, P=0.01) and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3, P=0.03) independent of age, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and dietary variables. Non-fried fish consumption was found inversely related to C-reactive protein (CRP, P=0.045) and IL-6 (P<0.01); and fried fish was observed being inversely related to soluble intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (sICAM-1) (P<0.01) but not associated with other biomarkers after adjustment for potential confounders. In conclusion, this study suggests that dietary intakes of LC n-3 PUFAs and fish are inversely associated with concentrations of some biomarkers reflecting lower levels of inflammation and endothelial activation. These results may partially explain the cardioprotective effects of fish consumption.
doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.01.016
PMCID: PMC2697819  PMID: 19406265
long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids; fish oil; biomarker; inflammation; endothelial function
18.  ICAM1 and VCAM1 polymorphisms, coronary artery calcium, and circulating levels of soluble ICAM-1: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) 
Atherosclerosis  2008;201(2):339-344.
Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) may be important contributors to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Using a stratified random sample of 2,880 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis we investigated the relationship of 12 ICAM1 and 17 VCAM1 SNPs and coronary artery calcium (CAC) and ICAM1 SNPs and circulating levels of soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1). There were no ICAM1 or VCAM1 SNPs significantly associated with CAC in any of the four race/ethnic groups. In a subset of 1,451 subjects with sICAM-1 measurements, we observed a significant association with rs5491 in all four race/ethnic groups corroborating previous research that has shown that the T-allele of rs5491 interferes with the monoclonal antibody used to measure sICAM-1 in this study. After excluding all rs5491 T-allele carriers, several ICAM1 SNPs were significantly associated with sICAM-1 levels; rs5496 in African Americans, rs5498 and rs3093030 in European Americans, and rs1799969 in Hispanics. Our results identified ICAM1 polymorphisms that were significantly associated with sICAM-1 level but not CAC, a subclinical marker of atherosclerosis.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2008.02.031
PMCID: PMC2615541  PMID: 18420209
coronary artery calcium; intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1); soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1); gene; single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP); haplotypes
19.  Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation, and the Incident Heart Failure in the Elderly: the Cardiovascular Health Study 
Circulation. Heart failure  2008;1(4):242-248.
Background
Inflammation markers and MetS are associated with risk of CHF. We evaluated whether combining inflammation markers and metabolic syndrome (MetS) provided additive information for incident congestive heart failure (CHF), and if incorporating inflammation markers to the MetS definition added prognostic information.
Methods and Results
We studied 4017 men and women ≥ 65 years old, without baseline CHF or diabetes, participating in the Cardiovascular Health Study, an observational study with 12.2 years follow-up and 966 cases of incident CHF. Baseline “C-reactive protein (CRP)-MetS” or “interleukin-6 (IL-6)-MetS” were defined as presence of 3 out of 6 components, with elevated CRP (≥3 mg/L) or IL-6 (≥2.21 pg/mL) as a 6th component added to ATPIII criteria. Cox models adjusted for CHF risk factors and incident coronary disease, were used to calculate HRs for CHF. MetS and elevated inflammation markers were independently associated with CHF risk (HRs, 95 % CI: 1.32, 1.16–1.51 for MetS; 1.53, 1.34–1.75 for CRP; 1.37, 1.19–1.55 for IL-6). There was a 20% relative excess risk attributed to the combination of MetS and CRP (95% CI −44% to 88%). CRP-MetS and IL-6-MetS definitions reclassified 18% and 13%, respectively of participants as MetS. Both CRP-MetS and IL-6-MetS increased risk of CHF by 60% compared to those without MetS.
Conclusion
MetS and inflammation markers provided additive information on CHF risk in this elderly cohort. Inflammation-incorporated MetS definitions identified more participants with the same risk level as ATPIII MetS. Considering inflammation markers and MetS together may be useful in clinical and research settings.
doi:10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.108.785485
PMCID: PMC2762642  PMID: 19808298
heart failure; metabolism; inflammation
20.  Race/ethnicity and telomere length in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Aging cell  2009;8(3):251-257.
Summary
Telomere length has emerged as a marker of exposure to oxidative stress and aging. Race/ethnic differences in telomere length have been infrequently investigated. Leucocyte telomere length (LTL) was assessed 981 white, black and Hispanic men and women aged 45-84 years participating in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Direct measurement and questionnaire were used to assess covariates. Linear regression was used to estimate associations of LTL with race/ethnicity and age after adjustment for sex, income, education, smoking, physical activity, diet, and body mass index. On average blacks and Hispanics had shorter telomeres than whites (adjusted mean differences (standard error) in T/S ratio compared to whites: -0.041 (0.018) for blacks and -0.044 (0.018) for Hispanics). Blacks and Hispanics showed greater differences in telomere length associated with age than whites (adjusted mean differences in T/S ratio per one year increase in age -0.0018, -0.0047, and -0.0055 in whites, blacks, and Hispanics respectively). Differences in age associations were more pronounced and only statistically significant in women. Race/ethnic differences in LTL may reflect the cumulative burden of differential exposure to oxidative stress (and its predictors) over the lifecourse.
doi:10.1111/j.1474-9726.2009.00470.x
PMCID: PMC2713110  PMID: 19302371
Telomeres; race/ethnicity; aging
21.  Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Mild and Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease Determined Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cystatin C: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 
Background:
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH) is associated with end-stage renal disease and chronic kidney disease, but the association of LVH with mild impairment in kidney function is not known. We hypothesized that mild and moderate reductions in kidney function, reflected in higher serum cystatin C concentrations, would be linearly associated with a higher prevalence of LVH.
Study Design:
Cross-sectional observational study.
Settings and Participants:
4,971 participants participating in baseline examinations in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population-based study with several sites in the U.S.
Predictor:
Cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcysC)
Outcomes:
LVH and left ventricular (LV) mass index.
Measurements:
Serum cystatin C and creatinine, LV mass obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). LVH cutoffs for males and females were defined by the upper 95th percentile of LV mass index of all MESA participants without hypertension.
Results:
LVH was distinctly more prevalent (>12%) only in the lowest two deciles of eGFRcysC (<75 ml/min/1.73 m2). When participants with stage III or higher chronic kidney disease (creatinine eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2) were excluded, the odds for LVH increased for each lower category of eGFRcysC below 75 ml/min/1.73 m2: 1.6 the odds for LVH with an eGFRcysC between 60-75 ml/min/1.73 m2 (95% confidence interval 1.20-2.07, P = 0.001), and 2.0 the odds for an eGFRcysC <60 ml/min/1.73 m2 (1.03-3.75, P = 0.04), after adjustment for demographic factors, study site, diabetes, and smoking. The association of the a lower eGFRcysC with LVH was attenuated after further adjustment for hypertension.
Limitations:
Cross-sectional, rather than longitudinal design, lack of participants with more advanced kidney disease, lack of a direct measurement of glomerular filtration rate.
Conclusions:
Among subjects without CKD, eGFRcysC ≤ 75 ml/min/1.73 m2 was associated with a higher odds of LVH.
doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2008.06.012
PMCID: PMC2597288  PMID: 18845370
kidney disease; cystatin C; glomerular filtration rate; left ventricular hypertrophy; left ventricular mass; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

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