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author:("schughart, N")
1.  Deficiencies in current childhood immunization indicators. 
Public Health Reports  1998;113(6):527-532.
OBJECTIVE: To investigate "up-to-date" and "age-appropriate" indicators of preschool vaccination status and their implications for vaccination policy. METHODS: The authors analyzed medical records data from the Baltimore Immunization Study for 525 2-year-olds born from August 1988 through March 1989 to mothers living in low-income Census tracts of the city of Baltimore. RESULTS: While only 54% of 24-month-old children were up-to-date for the primary series, indicators of up-to-date coverage were consistently higher, by 37 or more percentage points, than corresponding age-appropriate indicators. Almost 80% of children who failed to receive the first dose of DTP or OPV age-appropriately failed to be up-to-date by 24 months of age for the primary series. CONCLUSIONS: Age-appropriate immunization indicators more accurately reflect adequacy of protection for preschoolers than up-to-date indicators at both the individual and population levels. Age-appropriate receipt of the first dose of DTP should be monitored to identify children likely to be underimmunized. Age-appropriate indicators should also be incorporated as vaccination coverage estimators in population-based surveys and as quality of care indicators for managed care organizations. These changes would require accurate dates for each vaccination and support the need to develop population-based registries.
PMCID: PMC1308436  PMID: 9847924
2.  Estimating vaccination coverage using parental recall, vaccination cards, and medical records. 
Public Health Reports  1998;113(6):521-526.
OBJECTIVE: To compare estimates based on vaccination cards, parental recall, and medical records of the percentages of children up-to-date on vaccinations for diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis; polio; and measles, mumps, and rubella. METHOD: The authors analyzed parent interview and medical records data from the Baltimore Immunization Study for 525 2-year-olds born from August 1988 through March 1989 to mothers living in low-income Census tracts of the city of Baltimore. RESULTS: Only one-third of children had vaccination cards; based on medical records, these children had higher up-to-date coverage at 24 months of age than did children without cards. For individual vaccines, only two-thirds of parents could provide information to calculate coverage rates; however, almost all provided enough information to estimate coverage for the primary series. For each vaccine and the series, parental recall estimates were at least 17 percentage points higher than estimates from medical records. For children without vaccination cards whose parents could not provide coverage information, up-to-date rates based on medical records were consistently lower than for children with cards or with parents who provided coverage information. CONCLUSIONS: Population-based vaccine coverage surveys that rely on vaccination cards or parental recall or both may overestimate vaccination coverage.
PMCID: PMC1308435  PMID: 9847923

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