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1.  High Prevalence of Screen Detected Prostate Cancer in West Africans: Implications for Racial Disparity of Prostate Cancer 
The Journal of urology  2014;192(3):730-735.
Purpose
To our knowledge the reasons for the high rates of prostate cancer in black American men are unknown. Genetic and lifestyle factors have been implicated. Better understanding of prostate cancer rates in West African men would help clarify why black American men have such high rates since the groups share genetic ancestry and yet have different lifestyles and screening practices. To estimate the prostate cancer burden in West African men we performed a population based screening study with biopsy confirmation in Ghana.
Materials and Methods
We randomly selected 1,037 healthy men 50 to 74 years old from Accra, Ghana for prostate cancer screening with prostate specific antigen testing and digital rectal examination. Men with a positive screen result (positive digital rectal examination or prostate specific antigen greater than 2.5 ng/ml) underwent transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies.
Results
Of the 1,037 men 154 (14.9%) had a positive digital rectal examination and 272 (26.2%) had prostate specific antigen greater than 2.5 ng/ml, including 166 with prostate specific antigen greater than 4.0 ng/ml. A total of 352 men (33.9%) had a positive screen by prostate specific antigen or digital rectal examination and 307 (87%) underwent biopsy. Of these men 73 were confirmed to have prostate cancer, yielding a 7.0% screen detected prostate cancer prevalence (65 patients), including 5.8% with prostate specific antigen greater than 4.0 ng/ml.
Conclusions
In this relatively unscreened population in Africa the screen detected prostate cancer prevalence is high, suggesting a possible role of genetics in prostate cancer etiology and the disparity in prostate cancer risk between black and white American men. Further studies are needed to confirm the high prostate cancer burden in African men and the role of genetics in prostate cancer etiology.
doi:10.1016/j.juro.2014.04.017
PMCID: PMC4332806  PMID: 24747091
prostatic neoplasms; prostate-specific antigen; mass screening; African Americans; Africa
2.  Vitamin D Deficiency in Reproductive Age Mongolian Women: A Cross Sectional Study 
Vitamin D production is critical not only for rickets prevention but for its role in several chronic diseases of adulthood. Maternal vitamin D status also has consequences for the developing fetus. This study assessed the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]<20 ng/ml) and insufficiency [25(OH)D = 20–29 ng/ml] in spring, among reproductive age Mongolian women.
Blood was drawn in March and April, 2009 from 420 Mongolian women, 18–44 years of age. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were measured, anthropometric measurements were performed and information was collected by interview on lifestyle, dietary and reproductive factors. Logarithm-transformed 25(OH)D levels were compared across risk factor categories by analysis of variance. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the independent associations of factors with vitamin D status. Cutaneous vitamin D3 synthesis was assessed between December and July using a standard 7-dehydrocholesterol ampoule model.
The vast majority of women 415 (98.8%) had serum 25(OH)D <20 ng/ml (50 nmol/l) with an additional 4 women (<1%) in the insufficient range (20–29 ng/ml); only one women (0.2%) had sufficient levels (>30 ng/ml or 75 nmol/l). 25(OH)D concentrations were positively and independently associated with educational status and use of vitamin D supplements, but not with other demographic, lifestyle, reproductive, or anthropometric factors. 25(OH)D levels were not associated with dietary factors in this population, as there is little access to foods containing vitamin D in Mongolia. No production of previtamin D3 was observed until March and was maximally effective in April and was sustained through July.
These data suggest that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in spring among reproductive age women in Mongolia is high. Given the lack of naturally vitamin D-rich food in the diet and limited use of vitamin D supplements, food fortification and/or supplementation with vitamin D should be considered among these women.
doi:10.1016/j.jsbmb.2013.09.011
PMCID: PMC3909713  PMID: 24076033
25-hydroxyvitamin D; vitamin D; vitamin D deficiency; healthy women; reproductive age
3.  Personal history of diabetes, genetic susceptibility to diabetes, and risk of brain glioma: a pooled analysis of observational studies 
Background
Brain glioma is a relatively rare and fatal malignancy in adulthood with few known risk factors. Some observational studies have reported inverse associations between diabetes and subsequent glioma risk, but possible mechanisms are unclear.
Methods
We conducted a pooled analysis of original data from five nested case-control studies and two case-control studies from the U.S. and China that included 962 glioma cases and 2,195 controls. We examined self-reported diabetes history in relation to glioma risk, as well as effect modification by seven glioma risk-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also examined the associations between 13 diabetes risk-associated SNPs, identified from genome-wide association studies, and glioma risk. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models.
Results
We observed a 42% reduced risk of glioma for individuals with a history of diabetes (OR=0.58, 95% CI: 0.40–0.84). The association did not differ by sex, study design, or after restricting to glioblastoma, the most common histological sub-type. We did not observe any significant per-allele trends among the 13 diabetes-related SNPs examined in relation to glioma risk.
Conclusion
These results support an inverse association between diabetes history and glioma risk. The role of genetic susceptibility to diabetes cannot be excluded, and should be pursued in future studies together with other factors that might be responsible for the diabetes-glioma association.
Impact
These data suggest the need for studies that can evaluate, separately, the association between type 1 and type 2 diabetes and subsequent risk of adult glioma.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0913
PMCID: PMC3947107  PMID: 24220915
diabetes mellitus; brain cancer; glioma; cancer; epidemiology
4.  The Role of Hormones in the Differences in the Incidence of Breast Cancer between Mongolia and the United Kingdom 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(12):e114455.
Background
There are striking differences in breast cancer incidence between Asian and western women. Rates vary substantially within Asia also, with Mongolia's even lower than China's. These profound differences have been speculated to be due in part to diet, mediated by circulating hormone concentrations.
Methods
Sex steroid hormone concentrations were measured in women living in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and the United Kingdom (U.K.). Diet was obtained by interview and national survey data. Mean hormone differences were compared by country, and systematic variation by number of days since last menstrual period was modeled and adjusted for age and parity; difference in overall area under the curves was assessed.
Findings
The diet in Mongolia was higher in meat and dairy than in the U.K. Mean testosterone concentrations were 18.5% lower (p<0.0001) while estradiol concentrations were 19.1% higher (p = 0.02) in Mongolian than British women, adjusted for age and parity. Progesterone was almost 50% higher in Mongolian women (p = 0.04), particularly during the follicular phase and early luteal surge. Hormone concentrations generally were similar in Mongolian women born in Ulaanbaatar compared with those born in rural areas, although there was a decreasing progesterone trend by degree of westernization (rural Mongolia; urban Mongolia; U.K.). Mean hormone differences were similar when restricted to parous women, and with further adjustment for body mass index, height, and smoking status.
Interpretation
These data augment accumulating evidence that circulating estrogens are unlikely to explain reduced breast cancer rates in Asia compared with the west, and suggest casting a wider net with respect to biomarkers. Lower testosterone and higher progesterone in Mongolian women raise the possibility that these hormones may be important to consider. In addition, the almost exclusive dietary reliance of Mongolians on meat and dairy argues against beneficial effects of a low-fat diet on circulating hormones explaining international breast cancer differences.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0114455
PMCID: PMC4275167  PMID: 25536229
5.  A migrant study of pubertal timing and tempo in British-Bangladeshi girls at varying risk for breast cancer 
Introduction
Earlier menarche is related to subsequent breast cancer risk, yet international differences in the age and tempo of other pubertal milestones and their relationships with body mass index (BMI) are not firmly established in populations at differing risk for breast cancer. We compared age and tempo of adrenarche, thelarche, pubarche, and menarche in a migrant study of Bangladeshi girls to the United Kingdom (UK) and assessed whether differences by migration were explained by differences in BMI.
Methods
Included were groups of Bangladeshi (n =168), British-Bangladeshi (n =174) and white British (n =54) girls, aged 5 to 16 years. Interviewer-administered questionnaires obtained pubertal staging; height and weight were measured. Salivary dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate concentrations >400 pg/ml defined adrenarche. Median ages of pubertal milestones and hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from Weibull survival models.
Results
In all three groups, adrenarche occurred earliest, followed by thelarche, pubarche, and finally menarche. Neither median age at adrenarche (Bangladeshi = 7.2, British-Bangladeshi = 7.4, white British = 7.1; P-trend = 0.70) nor at menarche (Bangladeshi = 12.5, British-Bangladeshi = 12.1, white British = 12.6; P-trend = 0.70) differed across groups. In contrast, median age at thelarche (Bangladeshi = 10.7, British-Bangladeshi = 9.6, white British = 8.7; P-trend <0.01) occurred earlier among girls living in the UK. Compared with Bangladeshi girls, HRs (95% CI) for earlier thelarche were 1.6 (1.1 to 2.4) for British-Bangladeshi girls and 2.6 (1.5 to 4.4) for white British girls (P-trend <0.01), but were attenuated after adjustment for BMI (British-Bangladeshi = 1.1 (0.7 to 1.8), white British = 1.7(1.0 to 3.1); P-trend =0.20).
Conclusions
Thelarche occurred earlier, but puberty progressed slower with increasing exposure to the UK environment; differences were partially explained by greater BMI. The growth environment might account for much of the ethnic differences in pubertal development observed across and within countries.
doi:10.1186/s13058-014-0469-8
PMCID: PMC4303203  PMID: 25398700
6.  Childhood Environment Influences Adrenarcheal Timing among First-Generation Bangladeshi Migrant Girls to the UK 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(10):e109200.
Background
Adrenarche is a key early life event that marks middle childhood at approximately 7 years of age. Earlier work with British-Bangladeshi migrant women suggested that environmental conditions experienced before adrenarche influence adult reproductive function. We therefore investigated whether Bangladeshi children who migrate to the United Kingdom (UK) reach adrenarche earlier than non-migrants in Bangladesh or the United Kingdom.
Methods and Findings
Healthy girls, aged 5–16 years, were recruited from schools in Sylhet, Bangladesh and London, England comprising four groups: Sylhetis (n = 165), first-generation migrants to the United Kingdom (n = 42), second-generation girls (n = 162), and British girls of European origin (n = 50). Anthropometric measurements were collected together with questionnaire data for migration and socioeconomic characteristics. Saliva samples were assayed for dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Multiple linear regressions tested for group differences in anthropometric and socioeconomic variables and DHEAS levels. Median ages at adrenarche (DHEAS>400 pg/ml) were estimated using Weibull regression models for parametric survival analysis. Hazard ratios for reaching adrenarche earlier and 95% confidence intervals (CI), both unadjusted and adjusted for anthropometric variables, were estimated from the survival analyses. First-generation migrants had a median age at adrenarche (5.3 years) that was significantly earlier than Sylheti (7.2), second-generation (7.4), and European (7.1) girls. In univariate analyses, first-generation girls reached adrenarche significantly earlier than Sylhetis [HR (CI): 2.8 (1.4–5.5]. In multivariate models, first generation girls still reached adrenarche earlier than Sylhetis after adjusting for height [HR(CI): 1.9 (0.9–4.1)] and weight [HR(CI):1.7 (0.8–3.8)], but these results were attenuated.
Conclusions
We suggest that rapid catch-up growth experienced by first generation girls during early childhood may explain their advanced adrenarche. The environmental conditions leading to an earlier adrenarche, as well as the health implications of this early transition, merit further exploration.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0109200
PMCID: PMC4195659  PMID: 25309977
7.  Prospective evaluation of serum sarcosine and risk of prostate cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial 
Carcinogenesis  2013;34(10):2281-2285.
Metabolomic profiling has identified, sarcosine, a derivative of the amino acid glycine, as an important metabolite involved in the etiology or natural history of prostate cancer. We examined the association between serum sarcosine levels and risk of prostate cancer in 1122 cases (813 non-aggressive and 309 aggressive) and 1112 controls in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Sarcosine was quantified using high-throughput liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. A significantly increased risk of prostate cancer was observed with increasing levels of sarcosine (odds ratio [OR] for the highest quartile of exposure [Q4] versus the lowest quartile [Q1] = 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02, 1.65; P-trend 0.03). When stratified by disease aggressiveness, we observed a stronger association for non-aggressive cases (OR for Q4 versus Q1 = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.88; P-trend 0.006) but no association for aggressive prostate cancer (OR for Q4 versus Q1 = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.73, 1.47; P-trend 0.89). Although not statistically significant, temporal analyses showed a stronger association between sarcosine and prostate cancer for serum collected closer to diagnosis, suggesting that sarcosine may be an early biomarker of disease. Interestingly, the association between sarcosine and prostate cancer risk was stronger among men with diabetes (OR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.04, 6.84) compared with those without reported diabetes (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.95–1.59, P-interaction = 0.01). This study found that elevated levels of serum sarcosine are associated with an increased prostate cancer risk and evidence to suggest that sarcosine may be an early biomarker for this disease.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgt176
PMCID: PMC3786375  PMID: 23698636
8.  Confirmation of 5p12 as a susceptibility locus for progesterone-receptor-positive, lower grade breast cancer 
Milne, Roger L. | Goode, Ellen L. | García-Closas, Montserrat | Couch, Fergus J. | Severi, Gianluca | Hein, Rebecca | Fredericksen, Zachary | Malats, Núria | Zamora, M. Pilar | Pérez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Benítez, Javier | Dörk, Thilo | Schürmann, Peter | Karstens, Johann H. | Hillemanns, Peter | Cox, Angela | Brock, Ian W. | Elliot, Graeme | Cross, Simon S. | Seal, Sheila | Turnbull, Clare | Renwick, Anthony | Rahman, Nazneen | Shen, Chen-Yang | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Huang, Chiun-Sheng | Hou, Ming-Feng | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Bojesen, Stig E. | Lanng, Charlotte | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Kristensen, Vessela | Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise | Hopper, John L. | Dite, Gillian S. | Apicella, Carmel | Southey, Melissa C. | Lambrechts, Diether | Yesilyurt, Betül T. | Floris, Giuseppe | Leunen, Karin | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | Gaborieau, Valerie | Brennan, Paul | McKay, James | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Barile, Monica | Giles, Graham G. | Baglietto, Laura | John, Esther M. | Miron, Alexander | Chanock, Stephen J. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Sherman, Mark E. | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Bogdanova, Natalia V. | Antonenkova, Natalia N. | Zalutsky, Iosif V. | Rogov, Yuri I. | Fasching, Peter A. | Bayer, Christian M. | Ekici, Arif B. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Brenner, Hermann | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Meindl, Alfons | Heil, Joerg | Bartram, Claus R. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Thomas, Gilles D. | Hoover, Robert N. | Fletcher, Olivia | Gibson, Lorna J. | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Peto, Julian | Nickels, Stefan | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Ziogas, Argyrios | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael | Miller, Nicola | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Broeks, Annegien | Van ‘t Veer, Laura J. | Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M. | Pharoah, Paul D.P. | Dunning, Alison M. | Pooley, Karen A. | Marme, Frederik | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Burwinkel, Barbara | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Kang, Daehee | Yoo, Keun-Young | Noh, Dong-Young | Ahn, Sei-Hyun | Hunter, David J. | Hankinson, Susan E. | Kraft, Peter | Lindstrom, Sara | Chen, Xiaoqing | Beesley, Jonathan | Hamann, Ute | Harth, Volker | Justenhoven, Christina | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Hooning, Maartje | Hollestelle, Antoinette | Oldenburg, Rogier A. | Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine | Khusnutdinova, Elza | Bermisheva, Marina | Prokofieva, Darya | Farahtdinova, Albina | Olson, Janet E. | Wang, Xianshu | Humphreys, Manjeet K. | Wang, Qin | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Easton, Douglas F.
Background
The single nucleotide polymorphism 5p12-rs10941679has been found to be associated with risk of breast cancer, particularly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We aimed to further explore this association overall, and by tumor histopathology, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.
Methods
Data were combined from 37 studies, including 40,972 invasive cases, 1,398 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 46,334 controls, all of white European ancestry, as well as 3,007 invasive cases and 2,337 controls of Asian ancestry. Associations overall and by tumor invasiveness and histopathology were assessed using logistic regression.
Results
For white Europeans, the per-allele odds ratio (OR) associated with 5p12-rs10941679 was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI] =1.08–1.14, P=7×10−18) for invasive breast cancer and 1.10 (95%CI=1.01–1.21, P=0.03) for DCIS. For Asian women, the estimated OR for invasive disease was similar (OR=1.07, 95%CI=0.99–1.15, P=0.09). Further analyses suggested that the association in white Europeans was largely limited to progesterone receptor (PR)-positive disease (per-allele OR=1.16, 95%CI=1.12–1.20, P=1×10−18 versus OR=1.03, 95%CI=0.99–1.07, P=0.2 for PR-negative disease; P-heterogeneity=2×10−7); heterogeneity by estrogen receptor status was not observed (P=0.2) once PR status was accounted for. The association was also stronger for lower-grade tumors (per-allele OR [95%CI]=1.20 [1.14–1.25], 1.13 [1.09–1.16] and 1.04 [0.99–1.08] for grade 1, 2 and 3/4, respectively; P–trend=5×10−7).
Conclusion
5p12 is a breast cancer susceptibility locus for PR-positive, lower gradebreast cancer.
Impact
Multi-centre fine-mapping studies of this region are needed as a first step to identifying the causal variant or variants.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-0569
PMCID: PMC4164116  PMID: 21795498
Breast cancer; SNP; susceptibility; disease subtypes
9.  Fine Mapping of 14q24.1 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus 
Human genetics  2011;131(3):479-490.
In the National Cancer Institute Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) genome-wide association study of breast cancer, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker, rs999737, in the 14q24.1 interval, was associated with breast cancer risk. In order to fine map this region, we imputed a 3.93MB region flanking rs999737 for Stages 1 and 2 of the CGEMS study (5,692 cases, 5,576 controls) using the combined reference panels of the HapMap 3 and the 1000 Genomes Project. Single-marker association testing and variable-sized sliding-window haplotype analysis were performed, and for both analyses the initial tagging SNP rs999737 retained the strongest association with breast cancer risk. Investigation of contiguous regions did not reveal evidence for an additional independent signal. Therefore, we conclude that rs999737 is an optimal tag SNP for common variants in the 14q24.1 region and thus narrow the candidate variants that should be investigated in follow-up laboratory evaluation.
doi:10.1007/s00439-011-1088-4
PMCID: PMC4159746  PMID: 21959381
RAD51L1; breast cancer; genome-wide association study; fine-mapping; imputation
10.  Polymorphisms in genes related to one-carbon metabolism are not related to pancreatic cancer in PanScan and PanC4 
Cancer causes & control : CCC  2013;24(3):595-602.
Purpose
The evidence of a relation between folate intake and one-carbon metabolism (OCM) with pancreatic cancer (PanCa) is inconsistent. In this study, the association between genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to OCM and PanCa was assessed.
Methods
Using biochemical knowledge of the OCM pathway, we identified thirty-seven genes and 834 SNPs to examine in association with PanCa. Our study included 1,408 cases and 1,463 controls nested within twelve cohorts (PanScan). The ten SNPs and five genes with lowest p values (<0.02) were followed up in 2,323 cases and 2,340 controls from eight case-control studies (PanC4) that participated in PanScan2. The correlation of SNPs with metabolite levels was assessed for 649 controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
Results
When both stages were combined, we observed suggestive associations with PanCa for rs10887710 (MAT1A) (OR 1.13, 95%CI 1.04-1.23), rs1552462 (SYT9) (OR 1.27, 95%CI 1.02-1.59), and rs7074891 (CUBN) (OR 1.91, 95%CI 1.12-3.26). After correcting for multiple comparisons, no significant associations were observed in either the first or second stage. The three suggested SNPs showed no correlations with one-carbon biomarkers.
Conclusions
This is the largest genetic study to date to examine the relation between germline variations in OCM-related genes polymorphisms and the risk of PanCa. Suggestive evidence for an association between polymorphisms and PanCa was observed among the cohort-nested studies, but this did not replicate in the case-control studies. Our results do not strongly support the hypothesis that genes related to OCM play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis.
doi:10.1007/s10552-012-0138-0
PMCID: PMC4127987  PMID: 23334854
Pancreatic cancer; One-carbon metabolism; Polymorphisms; Biomarkers; Epidemiology
11.  Reproductive factors and menopausal hormone therapy and bladder cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study 
The incidence of bladder cancer among women is at least one third to one fourth that observed among men in many countries. Even after accounting for known risk factors, the reason for this gender disparity remains unexplained. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of reproductive factors and exogenous hormone use with a primary focus on menopausal hormone therapy use and risk of bladder cancer in women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Reproductive and hormonal factors were ascertained on the baseline questionnaire in 1995–1996 among 201,492 females who were followed until December 31, 2006. During follow-up, 651 cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed. A subset of women provided detailed information on use of MHT in a second questionnaire in 1996–1997. In this analysis, 127,361 females were followed through June 30, 2002 and 198 incident bladder cancer cases were identified. Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for smoking status, cigarettes per day, and body mass index using age as the time metric, were used to obtain hazard ratios (HRs). A reduced risk was observed among parous women (HR=0.76; 95% CI 0.62–0.93) and women who reported late age at menarche (≥15 years) (HR=0.57; 95% CI 0.39–0.84). Women who reported ever using estrogen and progestin therapy had a decreased risk (HR=0.53; 95% CI: 0.34–0.83) compared to women who did not report MHT use. No association was observed for estrogen only users (HR=0.82; 95% CI: 0.58–1.15). Our results suggest a putative role for sex hormones in the etiology of bladder cancer among women.
doi:10.1002/ijc.28022
PMCID: PMC3646919  PMID: 23319449
reproductive factors; estrogen; progestin; parity; bladder cancer
12.  Transforming Epidemiology for 21st Century Medicine and Public Health 
In 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) engaged the scientific community to provide a vision for cancer epidemiology in the 21st century. Eight overarching thematic recommendations, with proposed corresponding actions for consideration by funding agencies, professional societies, and the research community emerged from the collective intellectual discourse. The themes are (i) extending the reach of epidemiology beyond discovery and etiologic research to include multilevel analysis, intervention evaluation, implementation, and outcomes research; (ii) transforming the practice of epidemiology by moving towards more access and sharing of protocols, data, metadata, and specimens to foster collaboration, to ensure reproducibility and replication, and accelerate translation; (iii) expanding cohort studies to collect exposure, clinical and other information across the life course and examining multiple health-related endpoints; (iv) developing and validating reliable methods and technologies to quantify exposures and outcomes on a massive scale, and to assess concomitantly the role of multiple factors in complex diseases; (v) integrating “big data” science into the practice of epidemiology; (vi) expanding knowledge integration to drive research, policy and practice; (vii) transforming training of 21st century epidemiologists to address interdisciplinary and translational research; and (viii) optimizing the use of resources and infrastructure for epidemiologic studies. These recommendations can transform cancer epidemiology and the field of epidemiology in general, by enhancing transparency, interdisciplinary collaboration, and strategic applications of new technologies. They should lay a strong scientific foundation for accelerated translation of scientific discoveries into individual and population health benefits.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0146
PMCID: PMC3625652  PMID: 23462917
big data; clinical trials; cohort studies; epidemiology; genomics; medicine; public health; technologies; training; translational research
13.  Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative–specific breast cancer risk loci 
Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Couch, Fergus J | Lindstrom, Sara | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Brook, Mark N | orr, Nick | Rhie, Suhn Kyong | Riboli, Elio | Feigelson, Heather s | Le Marchand, Loic | Buring, Julie E | Eccles, Diana | Miron, Penelope | Fasching, Peter A | Brauch, Hiltrud | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Carpenter, Jane | Godwin, Andrew K | Nevanlinna, Heli | Giles, Graham G | Cox, Angela | Hopper, John L | Bolla, Manjeet K | Wang, Qin | Dennis, Joe | Dicks, Ed | Howat, Will J | Schoof, Nils | Bojesen, Stig E | Lambrechts, Diether | Broeks, Annegien | Andrulis, Irene L | Guénel, Pascal | Burwinkel, Barbara | Sawyer, Elinor J | Hollestelle, Antoinette | Fletcher, Olivia | Winqvist, Robert | Brenner, Hermann | Mannermaa, Arto | Hamann, Ute | Meindl, Alfons | Lindblom, Annika | Zheng, Wei | Devillee, Peter | Goldberg, Mark S | Lubinski, Jan | Kristensen, Vessela | Swerdlow, Anthony | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Dörk, Thilo | Muir, Kenneth | Matsuo, Keitaro | Wu, Anna H | Radice, Paolo | Teo, Soo Hwang | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Blot, William | Kang, Daehee | Hartman, Mikael | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | Shen, Chen-Yang | Southey, Melissa C | Park, Daniel J | Hammet, Fleur | Stone, Jennifer | Veer, Laura J Van’t | Rutgers, Emiel J | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Stewart-Brown, Sarah | Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep | Peto, Julian | Schrauder, Michael G | Ekici, Arif B | Beckmann, Matthias W | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Johnson, Nichola | Warren, Helen | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael J | Miller, Nicola | Marme, Federick | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Truong, Therese | Laurent-Puig, Pierre | Kerbrat, Pierre | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Nielsen, Sune F | Flyger, Henrik | Milne, Roger L | Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Menéndez, Primitiva | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Lichtner, Peter | Lochmann, Magdalena | Justenhoven, Christina | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Muranen, Taru A | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Greco, Dario | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Ito, Hidemi | Iwata, Hiroji | Yatabe, Yasushi | Antonenkova, Natalia N | Margolin, Sara | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M | Balleine, Rosemary | Tseng, Chiu-Chen | Van Den Berg, David | Stram, Daniel O | Neven, Patrick | Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie | Leunen, Karin | Rudolph, Anja | Nickels, Stefan | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Peterlongo, Paolo | Peissel, Bernard | Bernard, Loris | Olson, Janet E | Wang, Xianshu | Stevens, Kristen | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Mclean, Catriona | Coetzee, Gerhard A | Feng, Ye | Henderson, Brian E | Schumacher, Fredrick | Bogdanova, Natalia V | Labrèche, France | Dumont, Martine | Yip, Cheng Har | Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd | Cheng, Ching-Yu | Shrubsole, Martha | Long, Jirong | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Kauppila, Saila | knight, Julia A | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Tollenaar, Robertus A E M | Seynaeve, Caroline M | Kriege, Mieke | Hooning, Maartje J | Van den Ouweland, Ans M W | Van Deurzen, Carolien H M | Lu, Wei | Gao, Yu-Tang | Cai, Hui | Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P | Cross, Simon S | Reed, Malcolm W R | Signorello, Lisa | Cai, Qiuyin | Shah, Mitul | Miao, Hui | Chan, Ching Wan | Chia, Kee Seng | Jakubowska, Anna | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Hsiung, Chia-Ni | Wu, Pei-Ei | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Ashworth, Alan | Jones, Michael | Tessier, Daniel C | González-Neira, Anna | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M Rosario | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, Francois | Ambrosone, Christine B | Bandera, Elisa V | John, Esther M | Chen, Gary K | Hu, Jennifer J | Rodriguez-gil, Jorge L | Bernstein, Leslie | Press, Michael F | Ziegler, Regina G | Millikan, Robert M | Deming-Halverson, Sandra L | Nyante, Sarah | Ingles, Sue A | Waisfisz, Quinten | Tsimiklis, Helen | Makalic, Enes | Schmidt, Daniel | Bui, Minh | Gibson, Lorna | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Schmutzler, Rita K | Hein, Rebecca | Dahmen, Norbert | Beckmann, Lars | Aaltonen, Kirsimari | Czene, Kamila | Irwanto, Astrid | Liu, Jianjun | Turnbull, Clare | Rahman, Nazneen | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Olswold, Curtis | Slager, Susan | Pilarski, Robert | Ademuyiwa, Foluso | Konstantopoulou, Irene | Martin, Nicholas G | Montgomery, Grant W | Slamon, Dennis J | Rauh, Claudia | Lux, Michael P | Jud, Sebastian M | Bruning, Thomas | Weaver, Joellen | Sharma, Priyanka | Pathak, Harsh | Tapper, Will | Gerty, Sue | Durcan, Lorraine | Trichopoulos, Dimitrios | Tumino, Rosario | Peeters, Petra H | Kaaks, Rudolf | Campa, Daniele | Canzian, Federico | Weiderpass, Elisabete | Johansson, Mattias | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Travis, Ruth | Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise | Kolonel, Laurence N | Chen, Constance | Beck, Andy | Hankinson, Susan E | Berg, Christine D | Hoover, Robert N | Lissowska, Jolanta | Figueroa, Jonine D | Chasman, Daniel I | Gaudet, Mia M | Diver, W Ryan | Willett, Walter C | Hunter, David J | Simard, Jacques | Benitez, Javier | Dunning, Alison M | Sherman, Mark E | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Chanock, Stephen J | Hall, Per | Pharoah, Paul D P | Vachon, Celine | Easton, Douglas F | Haiman, Christopher A | Kraft, Peter
Nature genetics  2013;45(4):392-398e2.
Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20–30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry1. The etiology2 and clinical behavior3 of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition4. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10−12 and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10−8), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10−8) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10−8), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers.
doi:10.1038/ng.2561
PMCID: PMC3771695  PMID: 23535733
14.  A Genome-Wide “Pleiotropy Scan” Does Not Identify New Susceptibility Loci for Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(2):e85955.
Approximately 15–30% of all breast cancer tumors are estrogen receptor negative (ER−). Compared with ER-positive (ER+) disease they have an earlier age at onset and worse prognosis. Despite the vast number of risk variants identified for numerous cancer types, only seven loci have been unambiguously identified for ER-negative breast cancer. With the aim of identifying new susceptibility SNPs for this disease we performed a pleiotropic genome-wide association study (GWAS). We selected 3079 SNPs associated with a human complex trait or disease at genome-wide significance level (P<5×10−8) to perform a secondary analysis of an ER-negative GWAS from the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), including 1998 cases and 2305 controls from prospective studies. We then tested the top ten associations (i.e. with the lowest P-values) using three additional populations with a total sample size of 3509 ER+ cases, 2543 ER− cases and 7031 healthy controls. None of the 3079 selected variants in the BPC3 ER-GWAS were significant at the adjusted threshold. 186 variants were associated with ER− breast cancer risk at a conventional threshold of P<0.05, with P-values ranging from 0.049 to 2.3×10−4. None of the variants reached statistical significance in the replication phase. In conclusion, this study did not identify any novel susceptibility loci for ER-breast cancer using a “pleiotropic approach”.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085955
PMCID: PMC3921107  PMID: 24523857
15.  Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Two Susceptibility Loci for Osteosarcoma 
Nature genetics  2013;45(7):799-803.
Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy of adolescents and young adults. In order to better understand the genetic etiology of osteosarcoma, we performed a multi-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) consisting of 941 cases and 3,291 cancer-free adult controls of European ancestry. Two loci achieved genome-wide significance: rs1906953 at 6p21.3, in the glutamate receptor metabotropic 4 [GRM4] gene (P = 8.1 ×10-9), and rs7591996 and rs10208273 in a gene desert on 2p25.2 (P = 1.0 ×10-8 and 2.9 ×10-7). These two susceptibility loci warrant further exploration to uncover the biological mechanisms underlying susceptibility to osteosarcoma.
doi:10.1038/ng.2645
PMCID: PMC3910497  PMID: 23727862
16.  Increased Risk of Non-Fatal Myocardial Infarction Following Testosterone Therapy Prescription in Men 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(1):e85805.
Background
An association between testosterone therapy (TT) and cardiovascular disease has been reported and TT use is increasing rapidly.
Methods
We conducted a cohort study of the risk of acute non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) following an initial TT prescription (N = 55,593) in a large health-care database. We compared the incidence rate of MI in the 90 days following the initial prescription (post-prescription interval) with the rate in the one year prior to the initial prescription (pre-prescription interval) (post/pre). We also compared post/pre rates in a cohort of men prescribed phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5I; sildenafil or tadalafil, N = 167,279), and compared TT prescription post/pre rates with the PDE5I post/pre rates, adjusting for potential confounders using doubly robust estimation.
Results
In all subjects, the post/pre-prescription rate ratio (RR) for TT prescription was 1.36 (1.03, 1.81). In men aged 65 years and older, the RR was 2.19 (1.27, 3.77) for TT prescription and 1.15 (0.83, 1.59) for PDE5I, and the ratio of the rate ratios (RRR) for TT prescription relative to PDE5I was 1.90 (1.04, 3.49). The RR for TT prescription increased with age from 0.95 (0.54, 1.67) for men under age 55 years to 3.43 (1.54, 7.56) for those aged ≥75 years (ptrend = 0.03), while no trend was seen for PDE5I (ptrend = 0.18). In men under age 65 years, excess risk was confined to those with a prior history of heart disease, with RRs of 2.90 (1.49, 5.62) for TT prescription and 1.40 (0.91, 2.14) for PDE5I, and a RRR of 2.07 (1.05, 4.11).
Discussion
In older men, and in younger men with pre-existing diagnosed heart disease, the risk of MI following initiation of TT prescription is substantially increased.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085805
PMCID: PMC3905977  PMID: 24489673
17.  Diabetes and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium 
Cancer causes & control : CCC  2012;24(1):13-25.
Purpose
Diabetes is a suspected risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but questions remain about whether it is a risk factor or a result of the disease. This study prospectively examined the association between diabetes and the risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in pooled data from the NCI pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan).
Methods
The pooled data included 1,621 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 1,719 matched controls from twelve cohorts using a nested case–control study design. Subjects who were diagnosed with diabetes near the time (<2 years) of pancreatic cancer diagnosis were excluded from all analyses. All analyses were adjusted for age, race, gender, study, alcohol use, smoking, BMI, and family history of pancreatic cancer.
Results
Self-reported diabetes was associated with a forty percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI: 1.07, 1.84). The association differed by duration of diabetes; risk was highest for those with a duration of 2–8 years (OR = 1.79, 95 % CI: 1.25, 2.55); there was no association for those with 9+ years of diabetes (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.68, 1.52).
Conclusions
These findings provide support for a relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk. The absence of association in those with the longest duration of diabetes may reflect hypoinsulinemia and warrants further investigation.
doi:10.1007/s10552-012-0078-8
PMCID: PMC3529822  PMID: 23112111
Diabetes; Risk factor; Cohort consortium; Pancreatic cancer
18.  A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11 
Siddiq, Afshan | Couch, Fergus J. | Chen, Gary K. | Lindström, Sara | Eccles, Diana | Millikan, Robert C. | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Stram, Daniel O. | Beckmann, Lars | Rhie, Suhn Kyong | Ambrosone, Christine B. | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Amiano, Pilar | Apicella, Carmel | Baglietto, Laura | Bandera, Elisa V. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Berg, Christine D. | Bernstein, Leslie | Blomqvist, Carl | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brinton, Louise | Bui, Quang M. | Buring, Julie E. | Buys, Saundra S. | Campa, Daniele | Carpenter, Jane E. | Chasman, Daniel I. | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chen, Constance | Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S. | Czene, Kamila | Deming, Sandra L. | Diasio, Robert B. | Diver, W. Ryan | Dunning, Alison M. | Durcan, Lorraine | Ekici, Arif B. | Fasching, Peter A. | Feigelson, Heather Spencer | Fejerman, Laura | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Fletcher, Olivia | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Gaudet, Mia M. | Gerty, Susan M. | Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L. | Giles, Graham G. | van Gils, Carla H. | Godwin, Andrew K. | Graham, Nikki | Greco, Dario | Hall, Per | Hankinson, Susan E. | Hartmann, Arndt | Hein, Rebecca | Heinz, Judith | Hoover, Robert N. | Hopper, John L. | Hu, Jennifer J. | Huntsman, Scott | Ingles, Sue A. | Irwanto, Astrid | Isaacs, Claudine | Jacobs, Kevin B. | John, Esther M. | Justenhoven, Christina | Kaaks, Rudolf | Kolonel, Laurence N. | Coetzee, Gerhard A. | Lathrop, Mark | Le Marchand, Loic | Lee, Adam M. | Lee, I-Min | Lesnick, Timothy | Lichtner, Peter | Liu, Jianjun | Lund, Eiliv | Makalic, Enes | Martin, Nicholas G. | McLean, Catriona A. | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne | Meindl, Alfons | Miron, Penelope | Monroe, Kristine R. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Nickels, Stefan | Nyante, Sarah J. | Olswold, Curtis | Overvad, Kim | Palli, Domenico | Park, Daniel J. | Palmer, Julie R. | Pathak, Harsh | Peto, Julian | Pharoah, Paul | Rahman, Nazneen | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Schmidt, Daniel F. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Slager, Susan | Southey, Melissa C. | Stevens, Kristen N. | Sinn, Hans-Peter | Press, Michael F. | Ross, Eric | Riboli, Elio | Ridker, Paul M. | Schumacher, Fredrick R. | Severi, Gianluca | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Stone, Jennifer | Sund, Malin | Tapper, William J. | Thun, Michael J. | Travis, Ruth C. | Turnbull, Clare | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Waisfisz, Quinten | Wang, Xianshu | Wang, Zhaoming | Weaver, JoEllen | Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger | Wilkens, Lynne R. | Van Den Berg, David | Zheng, Wei | Ziegler, Regina G. | Ziv, Elad | Nevanlinna, Heli | Easton, Douglas F. | Hunter, David J. | Henderson, Brian E. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Kraft, Peter | Haiman, Christopher A. | Vachon, Celine M.
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(24):5373-5384.
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P ≤ 1 × 10-5 in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR = 1.16; P = 1.1 × 10−8) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR = 1.08, P = 1.3 × 10–6) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR = 1.01, P = 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.12; P = 1.1 × 10−9), and with both ER-positive (OR = 1.09; P = 1.5 × 10−5) and ER-negative (OR = 1.16, P = 2.5 × 10−7) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds381
PMCID: PMC3510753  PMID: 22976474
19.  Prediction of breast cancer risk by genetic risk factors, overall and by hormone receptor status 
Journal of medical genetics  2012;49(9):601-608.
Objective
There is increasing interest in adding common genetic variants identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) to breast cancer risk prediction models. First results from such models showed modest benefits in terms of risk discrimination. Heterogeneity of breast cancer as defined by hormone-receptor status has not been considered in this context. In this study we investigated the predictive capacity of 32 GWAS-detected common variants for breast cancer risk, alone and in combination with classical risk factors, and for tumors with different hormone receptor status.
Material and Methods
Within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), we analyzed 6009 invasive breast cancer cases and 7827 matched controls of European ancestry, with data on classical breast cancer risk factors and 32 common gene variants identified through GWAS. Discriminatory ability with respect to breast cancer of specific hormone receptor-status was assessed with the age- and cohort-adjusted concordance statistic (AUROCa). Absolute risk scores were calculated with external reference data. Integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) was used to measure improvements in risk prediction.
Results
We found a small but steady increase in discriminatory ability with increasing numbers of genetic variants included in the model (difference in AUROCa going from 2.7 to 4%). Discriminatory ability for all models varied strongly by hormone receptor status
Discussion and Conclusion
Adding information on common polymorphisms provides small but statistically significant improvements in the quality of breast cancer risk prediction models. We consistently observed better performance for receptor positive cases, but the gain in discriminatory quality is not sufficient for clinical application.
doi:10.1136/jmedgenet-2011-100716
PMCID: PMC3793888  PMID: 22972951
breast cancer; risk prediction; genetic factors; hormone receptor status
20.  Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia 
Cancer causes & control : CCC  2012;23(7):1047-1053.
Purpose
Data on international variation in breast cancer incidence may help to identify additional risk factors. Substantially lower breast cancer rates in Asia than in North America and Western Europe are established, but differences within Asia have been largely ignored despite heterogeneity in lifestyles and environments. Mongolia’s breast cancer experience is of interest because of its shared genetics but vastly different diet compared with other parts of Asia.
Methods
Age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality rates obtained from the International Association of Cancer Registries are presented for several Asian countries. Mongolian incidence rates obtained from its cancer registry describe incidence within the country.
Results
Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia (age standardized 8.0/100,000) is almost a third of rates in China (21.6/100,000), and over five times that of Japan (42.7/100,000) and Russia (43.2/100,000). Rates within Mongolia appear to have increased slightly over the last decade and are higher in urban than rural areas (annual percentage increase of age-standardized rates from 1998 to 2005 was 3.60 and 2.57%, respectively). The increase in breast cancer incidence with age plateaus at menopause, as in other Asian populations.
Conclusions
Mongolia’s low breast cancer incidence is of particular interest because of their unusual diet (primarily red meat and dairy) compared with other Asian countries. More intensive study of potential dietary, reproductive and lifestyle factors in Mongolia with comparison to other Asian populations may provide more clarity in what drives the international breast cancer rate differences.
doi:10.1007/s10552-012-9973-2
PMCID: PMC3786577  PMID: 22543542
Mongolia; Breast cancer; Urban-rural; Asia; International
21.  An Absolute Risk Model to Identify Individuals at Elevated Risk for Pancreatic Cancer in the General Population 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(9):e72311.
Purpose
We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer.
Patients and Methods
Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates.
Results
Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84–2.62]), heavy alcohol use (>3 drinks/day) (OR: 1.45 [1.19–1.76]), obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m2) (OR: 1.26 [1.09–1.45]), diabetes >3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13–2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40–2.32]), family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20–2.12]), non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype) (OR: 1.23 [1.10–1.37]) to (BB vs. OO genotype) (OR 1.58 [0.97–2.59]), rs3790844(chr1q32.1) (OR: 1.29 [1.19–1.40]), rs401681(5p15.33) (OR: 1.18 [1.10–1.26]) and rs9543325(13q22.1) (OR: 1.27 [1.18–1.36]). The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk.
Conclusion
Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0072311
PMCID: PMC3772857  PMID: 24058443
22.  Pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data highlights pancreatic development genes as susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer 
Carcinogenesis  2012;33(7):1384-1390.
Four loci have been associated with pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Pathway-based analysis of GWAS data is a complementary approach to identify groups of genes or biological pathways enriched with disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose individual effect sizes may be too small to be detected by standard single-locus methods. We used the adaptive rank truncated product method in a pathway-based analysis of GWAS data from 3851 pancreatic cancer cases and 3934 control participants pooled from 12 cohort studies and 8 case–control studies (PanScan). We compiled 23 biological pathways hypothesized to be relevant to pancreatic cancer and observed a nominal association between pancreatic cancer and five pathways (P < 0.05), i.e. pancreatic development, Helicobacter pylori lacto/neolacto, hedgehog, Th1/Th2 immune response and apoptosis (P = 2.0 × 10−6, 1.6 × 10−5, 0.0019, 0.019 and 0.023, respectively). After excluding previously identified genes from the original GWAS in three pathways (NR5A2, ABO and SHH), the pancreatic development pathway remained significant (P = 8.3 × 10−5), whereas the others did not. The most significant genes (P < 0.01) in the five pathways were NR5A2, HNF1A, HNF4G and PDX1 for pancreatic development; ABO for H. pylori lacto/neolacto; SHH for hedgehog; TGFBR2 and CCL18 for Th1/Th2 immune response and MAPK8 and BCL2L11 for apoptosis. Our results provide a link between inherited variation in genes important for pancreatic development and cancer and show that pathway-based approaches to analysis of GWAS data can yield important insights into the collective role of genetic risk variants in cancer.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgs151
PMCID: PMC3405651  PMID: 22523087
23.  Past body mass index and risk of mortality among women 
Background
Epidemiologic studies of BMI in relation to mortality commonly exclude persons with health conditions and/or a history of smoking in order to prevent bias resulting from illness-related weight loss (“reverse causation”). Analysis of BMI from an earlier time period may minimize reverse causation without requiring exclusion of participants based on disease or smoking history.
Methods
We prospectively examined BMI based on technician measurements of weight and height from 10 years prior to start of follow-up in relation to subsequent mortality in a cohort of 50,186 women who were 40 to 93 years old at baseline in 1987–1989. Deaths were ascertained through the U.S. National Death Index. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios of mortality, adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, income, menopausal hormone use, smoking, and physical activity.
Results
During 10 years of follow-up through 1997, 5,201 women died. Overall, we observed a J-shaped association between BMI and mortality, with increased risk for women who were underweight, overweight, or obese. The hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of mortality for BMI categories of <18.5, 18.5–20.9, 21.0–23.4 (reference), 23.5–24.9, 25.0–27.4, 27.5–29.9, 30.0–34.9, and 35.0+ kg/m2 were 1.43 (1.19, 1.72), 1.07 (0.98, 1.17), 1.0 (reference), 1.10 (1.00, 1.20), 1.20 (1.11, 1.31), 1.23 (1.11, 1.37), 1.60 (1.44, 1.77), and 1.92 (1.64, 2.24). There was little evidence that preexisting conditions (heart disease, diabetes, and/or cancer) or smoking history modified the past BMI and mortality relation (p=0.54 and 0.76).
Conclusions
In this large cohort of women, BMI based on technician measurements of weight and height from 10 years prior to baseline showed increased risk for mortality across the range of overweight and obesity, regardless of disease and smoking history. Observed associations between overweight, obesity, and mortality in healthy individuals may also apply to persons with a history of disease or smoking.
doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0803801
PMCID: PMC3051416  PMID: 18209736
Body mass; weight; obesity; overweight; mortality; life-expectancy; epidemiology
24.  Estrogen Metabolism and Risk of Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women 
Background
Estrogens are recognized causal factors in breast cancer. Interindividual variation in estrogen metabolism may also influence the risk of breast cancer and could provide clues to mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. Long-standing hypotheses about how estrogen metabolism might influence breast cancer have not been adequately evaluated in epidemiological studies because of the lack of accurate, reproducible, and high-throughput assays for estrogen metabolites.
Methods
We conducted a prospective case–control study nested within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO). Participants included 277 women who developed invasive breast cancer (case subjects) and 423 matched control subjects; at PLCO baseline, all subjects were aged 55–74 years, postmenopausal and not using hormone therapy, and provided a blood sample. Liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure serum concentrations of 15 estrogens and estrogen metabolites, in unconjugated and conjugated forms, including the parent estrogens, estrone and estradiol, and estrogen metabolites in pathways defined by irreversible hydroxylation at the C-2, C-4, or C-16 positions of the steroid ring. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) approximating risk in highest vs lowest deciles of individual estrogens and estrogen metabolites, estrogens and estrogen metabolites grouped by metabolic pathways, and metabolic pathway ratios using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. All statistical tests were two-sided.
Results
Nearly all estrogens, estrogen metabolites, and metabolic pathway groups were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer; the serum concentration of unconjugated estradiol was strongly associated with the risk of breast cancer (HR = 2.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.19 to 3.62). No estrogen, estrogen metabolite, or metabolic pathway group remained statistically significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer after adjusting for unconjugated estradiol. The ratio of the 2-hydroxylation pathway to parent estrogens (HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.51 to 0.87) and the ratio of 4-hydroxylation pathway catechols to 4-hydroxylation pathway methylated catechols (HR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.72) were statistically significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer and remained so after adjustment for unconjugated estradiol.
Conclusions
More extensive 2-hydroxylation of parent estrogens is associated with lower risk, and less extensive methylation of potentially genotoxic 4-hydroxylation pathway catechols is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.
doi:10.1093/jnci/djr531
PMCID: PMC3283536  PMID: 22232133
25.  A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer 
Haiman, Christopher A | Chen, Gary K | Vachon, Celine M | Canzian, Federico | Dunning, Alison | Millikan, Robert C | Wang, Xianshu | Ademuyiwa, Foluso | Ahmed, Shahana | Ambrosone, Christine B | Baglietto, Laura | Balleine, Rosemary | Bandera, Elisa V | Beckmann, Matthias W | Berg, Christine D | Bernstein, Leslie | Blomqvist, Carl | Blot, William J | Brauch, Hiltrud | Buring, Julie E | Carey, Lisa A | Carpenter, Jane E | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chanock, Stephen J | Chasman, Daniel I | Clarke, Christine L | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S | Deming, Sandra L | Diasio, Robert B | Dimopoulos, Athanasios M | Driver, W Ryan | Dünnebier, Thomas | Durcan, Lorraine | Eccles, Diana | Edlund, Christopher K | Ekici, Arif B | Fasching, Peter A | Feigelson, Heather S | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Fostira, Florentia | Försti, Asta | Fountzilas, George | Gerty, Susan M | Giles, Graham G | Godwin, Andrew K | Goodfellow, Paul | Graham, Nikki | Greco, Dario | Hamann, Ute | Hankinson, Susan E | Hartmann, Arndt | Hein, Rebecca | Heinz, Judith | Holbrook, Andrea | Hoover, Robert N | Hu, Jennifer J | Hunter, David J | Ingles, Sue A | Irwanto, Astrid | Ivanovich, Jennifer | John, Esther M | Johnson, Nicola | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Kaaks, Rudolf | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Kolonel, Laurence N | Konstantopoulou, Irene | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Kulkarni, Swati | Lambrechts, Diether | Lee, Adam M | Le Marchand, Loïc | Lesnick, Timothy | Liu, Jianjun | Lindstrom, Sara | Mannermaa, Arto | Margolin, Sara | Martin, Nicholas G | Miron, Penelope | Montgomery, Grant W | Nevanlinna, Heli | Nickels, Stephan | Nyante, Sarah | Olswold, Curtis | Palmer, Julie | Pathak, Harsh | Pectasides, Dimitrios | Perou, Charles M | Peto, Julian | Pharoah, Paul D P | Pooler, Loreall C | Press, Michael F | Pylkäs, Katri | Rebbeck, Timothy R | Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L | Rosenberg, Lynn | Ross, Eric | Rüdiger, Thomas | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Sawyer, Elinor | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger | Schumacher, Fredrick | Severi, Gianluca | Sheng, Xin | Signorello, Lisa B | Sinn, Hans-Peter | Stevens, Kristen N | Southey, Melissa C | Tapper, William J | Tomlinson, Ian | Hogervorst, Frans B L | Wauters, Els | Weaver, JoEllen | Wildiers, Hans | Winqvist, Robert | Van Den Berg, David | Wan, Peggy | Xia, Lucy Y | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Zheng, Wei | Ziegler, Regina G | Siddiq, Afshan | Slager, Susan L | Stram, Daniel O | Easton, Douglas | Kraft, Peter | Henderson, Brian E | Couch, Fergus J
Nature Genetics  2011;43(12):1210-1214.
Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10−10). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10−9), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10−9). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.
doi:10.1038/ng.985
PMCID: PMC3279120  PMID: 22037553

Results 1-25 (83)