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author:("Hall, pappa")
2.  Primary ciliary dyskinesia: current state of the art 
Archives of Disease in Childhood  2007;92(12):1136-1140.
Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is usually inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder and presents with upper and lower respiratory tract infection, and mirror image arrangement in around 50% of cases. Cilia dysfunction is also implicated in a wider spectrum of disease, including polycystic liver and kidney disease, central nervous system problems including retinopathy and hydrocephalus, and biliary atresia. Cilia are complex structures, containing more than 250 proteins; recent studies have begun to locate PCD genes scattered throughout the genome. Screening tests for PCD include nasal nitric oxide and in vivo tests of ciliary motility such as the saccharin test. Specific diagnosis requires examination of cilia by light and electron microscopy, with epithelial culture in doubtful cases. This is only available in supra‐regional centres, recently centrally funded by the National Commissioning Group. Treatment is not evidence based and recommendations are largely extrapolated from cystic fibrosis and other suppurative lung diseases.
doi:10.1136/adc.2006.096958
PMCID: PMC2066071  PMID: 17634184
3.  Factors that influence engagement in collaborative practice 
Canadian Family Physician  2007;53(8):1318-1325.
OBJECTIVE
To generate hypotheses regarding factors that might influence engagement in collaborative practice.
DESIGN
Qualitative study using in-depth interviews.
SETTING
Participants interviewed each other in dyads. The pairing was based upon geographical location and proximity to each other.
PARTICIPANTS
Eight professionals from the disciplines of medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and massage therapy.
METHOD
Semistructured interviews, lasting 30 to 45 minutes each, were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were read by all research team members using independent content analysis for common words, phrases, statements, or units of text for key themes. At a subsequent face-to-face meeting, the team used an iterative process of comparing and contrasting key themes until consensus was reached. The transcripts were then analyzed further for subthemes using NVivo software.
MAIN FINDINGS
Initial findings suggest that some common characteristics grounded in family history, school experiences, social interactions, and professional training might influence collaborative practice choices. The narrative form of the interview broke down interpersonal and interprofessional barriers, creating a new level of trust and respect that could improve professional collaboration.
CONCLUSION
This study suggests that life experiences from childhood into later adulthood can and do influence professional choices.
PMCID: PMC1949257  PMID: 17872847

Results 1-3 (3)