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1.  Partial Inhibition of Adipose Tissue Lipolysis Improves Glucose Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity Without Alteration of Fat Mass 
PLoS Biology  2013;11(2):e1001485.
Partial inhibition of adipose tissue lipolysis does not increase fat mass but improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity through modulation of fatty acid turnover and induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis.
When energy is needed, white adipose tissue (WAT) provides fatty acids (FAs) for use in peripheral tissues via stimulation of fat cell lipolysis. FAs have been postulated to play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how chronic inhibition of fat mobilization from WAT modulates insulin sensitivity remains elusive. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) participates in the breakdown of WAT triacylglycerol into FAs. HSL haploinsufficiency and treatment with a HSL inhibitor resulted in improvement of insulin tolerance without impact on body weight, fat mass, and WAT inflammation in high-fat-diet–fed mice. In vivo palmitate turnover analysis revealed that blunted lipolytic capacity is associated with diminution in FA uptake and storage in peripheral tissues of obese HSL haploinsufficient mice. The reduction in FA turnover was accompanied by an improvement of glucose metabolism with a shift in respiratory quotient, increase of glucose uptake in WAT and skeletal muscle, and enhancement of de novo lipogenesis and insulin signalling in liver. In human adipocytes, HSL gene silencing led to improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, resulting in increased de novo lipogenesis and activation of cognate gene expression. In clinical studies, WAT lipolytic rate was positively and negatively correlated with indexes of insulin resistance and WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression, respectively. In obese individuals, chronic inhibition of lipolysis resulted in induction of WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression. Thus, reduction in WAT lipolysis reshapes FA fluxes without increase of fat mass and improves glucose metabolism through cell-autonomous induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis, which contributes to improved insulin sensitivity.
Author Summary
In periods of energy demand, mobilization of fat stores in mammals (i.e., adipose tissue lipolysis) is essential to provide energy in the form of fatty acids. In excess, however, fatty acids induce resistance to the action of insulin, which serves to regulate glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle and liver. Insulin resistance (or low insulin sensitivity) is believed to be a cornerstone of the complications of obesity such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. In this study, our clinical observation of natural variation in fat cell lipolysis in individuals reveals that a high lipolytic rate is associated with low insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, partial genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase, one of the enzymes involved in the breakdown of white adipose tissue lipids, results in improvement of insulin sensitivity in mice without gain in body weight and fat mass. We undertake a series of mechanistic studies in mice and in human fat cells to show that blunted lipolytic capacity increases the synthesis of new fatty acids from glucose in fat cells, a pathway that has recently been shown by others to be a major determinant of whole body insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, partial inhibition of adipose tissue lipolysis is a plausible strategy in the treatment of obesity-related insulin resistance.
doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001485
PMCID: PMC3576369  PMID: 23431266
2.  Human Frame Shift Mutations Affecting the Carboxyl Terminus of Perilipin Increase Lipolysis by Failing to Sequester the Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL) Coactivator AB-hydrolase-containing 5 (ABHD5)* 
The Journal of Biological Chemistry  2011;286(40):34998-35006.
Perilipin (PLIN1) is a constitutive adipocyte lipid droplet coat protein. N-terminal amphipathic helices and central hydrophobic stretches are thought to anchor it on the lipid droplet, where it appears to function as a scaffold protein regulating lipase activity. We recently identified two different C-terminal PLIN1 frame shift mutations (Leu-404fs and Val-398fs) in patients with a novel subtype of partial lipodystrophy, hypertriglyceridemia, severe insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (Gandotra, S., Le Dour, C., Bottomley, W., Cervera, P., Giral, P., Reznik, Y., Charpentier, G., Auclair, M., Delépine, M., Barroso, I., Semple, R. K., Lathrop, M., Lascols, O., Capeau, J., O'Rahilly, S., Magré, J., Savage, D. B., and Vigouroux, C. (2011) N. Engl. J. Med. 364, 740–748.) When overexpressed in preadipocytes, both mutants fail to inhibit basal lipolysis. Here we used bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to show that the mutants fail to bind ABHD5, permitting its constitutive coactivation of ATGL, resulting in increased basal lipolysis. siRNA-mediated knockdown of either ABHD5 or ATGL expression in the stably transfected cells expressing mutant PLIN1 reduced basal lipolysis. These insights from naturally occurring human variants suggest that the C terminus sequesters ABHD5 and thus inhibits basal ATGL activity. The data also suggest that pharmacological inhibition of ATGL could have therapeutic potential in patients with this rare but metabolically serious disorder.
doi:10.1074/jbc.M111.278853
PMCID: PMC3186430  PMID: 21757733
Cell Biology; Lipase; Lipid Droplets; Lipid Metabolism; Lipodystrophy

Results 1-2 (2)