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author:("boxall, R")
1.  Profiling CpG island field methylation in both morphologically normal and neoplastic human colonic mucosa 
British Journal of Cancer  2008;99(1):136-142.
Aberrant CpG island (CGI) methylation occurs early in colorectal neoplasia. Quantitative methylation-specific PCR profiling applied to biopsies was used to quantify low levels of CGI methylation of 18 genes in the morphologically normal colonic mucosa of neoplasia-free subjects, adenomatous polyp patients, cancer patients and their tumours. Multivariate statistical analyses distinguished tumour from mucosa with a sensitivity of 78.9% and a specificity of 100% (P=3 × 10−7). In morphologically normal mucosa, age-dependent CGI methylation was observed for APC, AXIN2, DKK1, HPP1, N33, p16, SFRP1, SFRP2 and SFRP4 genes, and significant differences in CGI methylation levels were detected between groups. Multinomial logistic regression models based on the CGI methylation profiles from normal mucosa correctly identified 78.9% of cancer patients and 87.9% of non-cancer (neoplasia-free+polyp) patients (P=4.93 × 10−7) using APC, HPP1, p16, SFRP4, WIF1 and ESR1 methylation as the most informative variables. Similarly, CGI methylation of SFRP4, SFRP5 and WIF1 correctly identified 61.5% of polyp patients and 78.9% of neoplasia-free subjects (P=0.0167). The apparently normal mucosal field of patients presenting with neoplasia has evidently undergone significant epigenetic modification. Methylation of the genes selected by the models may play a role in the earliest stages of the development of colorectal neoplasia.
doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6604432
PMCID: PMC2453007  PMID: 18542073
CpG island; DNA methylation; epigenetics; colorectal cancer; normal mucosa
2.  Ambulatory blood pressure in schoolchildren 
Archives of Disease in Childhood  1999;80(6):529-532.
OBJECTIVE—To define the range and variability of ambulatory blood pressure in normal schoolchildren.
DESIGN—Prospective study.
METHODS—Resting blood pressure of 1121 schoolchildren from Newcastle upon Tyne was recorded. An ambulatory blood pressure device, which uses both auscultatory (Korotkoff) and oscillometric methods of blood pressure measurement, was then put in place for 24hours.
RESULTS—The day was divided into three time periods: school, home, and night time. Normal centiles for blood pressure for each of these time periods were obtained and many daytime readings were outside reported normal resting levels. The normal variation of blood pressure was quantified by comparing each of these time periods with the resting readings. Resting systolic blood pressure did not predict 24 hour mean systolic blood pressure.
CONCLUSIONS—The availability of normal ambulatory blood pressure data on the level and variation of blood pressure in children may facilitate the early identification of hypertension in this age group.


PMCID: PMC1717942  PMID: 10332001

Results 1-2 (2)