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1.  Unraveling Genes, Hormones, and Breast Cancer 
doi:10.1093/jnci/djs193
PMCID: PMC3341311  PMID: 22472542
2.  Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants in LSP1 and RAD51L1 Are Associated with Mammographic Density Measures that Predict Breast Cancer Risk 
Vachon, Celine M. | Scott, Christopher G. | Fasching, Peter A. | Hall, Per | Tamimi, Rulla M. | Li, Jingmei | Stone, Jennifer | Apicella, Carmel | Odefrey, Fabrice | Gierach, Gretchen L. | Jud, Sebastian M. | Heusinger, Katharina | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Pollan, Marina | Fernández-Navarro, Pablo | González-Neira, Anna | Benítez, Javier | van Gils, Carla H. | Lokate, Mariëtte | Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte | Peeters, Petra H.M. | Brown, Judith | Leyland, Jean | Varghese, Jajini S. | Easton, Douglas F. | Thompson, Deborah J. | Luben, Robert N. | Warren, Ruth ML | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Loos, Ruth JF | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Ursin, Giske | Lee, Eunjung | Gayther, Simon A. | Ramus, Susan J. | Eeles, Rosalind A. | Leach, Martin O. | Kwan-Lim, Gek | Couch, Fergus J. | Giles, Graham G. | Baglietto, Laura | Krishnan, Kavitha | Southey, Melissa C. | Le Marchand, Loic | Kolonel, Laurence N. | Woolcott, Christy | Maskarinec, Gertraud | Haiman, Christopher A | Walker, Kate | Johnson, Nichola | McCormack, Valerie A. | Biong, Margarethe | Alnæs, Grethe I.G. | Gram, Inger Torhild | Kristensen, Vessela N. | Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | Lindström, Sara | Hankinson, Susan E. | Hunter, David J. | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Boyd, Norman F. | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Wesolowska, Ewa | Peplonska, Beata | Bukowska, Agnieszka | Reszka, Edyta | Liu, JianJun | Eriksson, Louise | Czene, Kamila | Audley, Tina | Wu, Anna H. | Pankratz, V. Shane | Hopper, John L. | dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel
Background
Mammographic density adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is a heritable marker of breast cancer susceptibility. Little is known about the biological mechanisms underlying the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk. We examined whether common low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility variants contribute to inter-individual differences in mammographic density measures.
Methods
We established an international consortium (DENSNP) of 19 studies from 10 countries, comprising 16,895 Caucasian women, to conduct a pooled cross-sectional analysis of common breast cancer susceptibility variants in 14 independent loci and mammographic density measures. Dense and non-dense areas, and percent density, were measured using interactive-thresholding techniques. Mixed linear models were used to assess the association between genetic variants and the square roots of mammographic density measures adjusted for study, age, case status, body mass index (BMI) and menopausal status.
Results
Consistent with their breast cancer associations, the C-allele of rs3817198 in LSP1 was positively associated with both adjusted dense area (p=0.00005) and adjusted percent density (p=0.001) whereas the A-allele of rs10483813 in RAD51L1 was inversely associated with adjusted percent density (p=0.003), but not with adjusted dense area (p=0.07).
Conclusion
We identified two common breast cancer susceptibility variants associated with mammographic measures of radio-dense tissue in the breast gland.
Impact
We examined the association of 14 established breast cancer susceptibility loci with mammographic density phenotypes within a large genetic consortium and identified two breast cancer susceptibility variants, LSP1-rs3817198 and RAD51L1-rs10483813, associated with mammographic measures and in the same direction as the breast cancer association.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-0066
PMCID: PMC3569092  PMID: 22454379
breast density; breast cancer; genetics; biomarkers; mammography
3.  Plasma carotenoid- and retinol-weighted multi-SNP scores and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium 
Background
Dietary and circulating carotenoids have been inversely associated with breast cancer risk, but observed associations may be due to confounding. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1), a gene encoding the enzyme involved in the first step of synthesizing vitamin A from dietary carotenoids, have been associated with circulating carotenoid concentrations and may serve as unconfounded surrogates for those biomarkers. We determined associations between variants in BCMO1 and breast cancer risk in a large cohort consortium.
Methods
We used unconditional logistic regression to test four SNPs in BCMO1 for associations with breast cancer risk in 9,226 cases and 10,420 controls from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We also tested weighted multi-SNP scores composed of the two SNPs with strong, confirmed associations with circulating carotenoid concentrations.
Results
Neither the individual SNPs nor the weighted multi-SNP scores were associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio (95% confidence interval) comparing extreme quintiles of weighted multi-SNP scores =1.04 (0.94–1.16) for β-carotene, 1.08 (0.98–1.20) for α-carotene, 1.04 (0.94–1.16) for β-cryptoxanthin, 0.95 (0.87–1.05) for lutein/zeaxanthin, and 0.92 (0.83–1.02) for retinol). Furthermore, no associations were observed when stratifying by estrogen receptor status, but power was limited.
Conclusions
Our results do not support an association between SNPs associated with circulating carotenoid concentrations and breast cancer risk.
Impact
Future studies will need additional genetic surrogates and/or sample sizes at least three times larger to contribute evidence of a causal link between carotenoids and breast cancer.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0017
PMCID: PMC3650115  PMID: 23515144
breast cancer; BCMO1; β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase 1; carotenoids; single nucleotide polymorphism
4.  Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions 
Schoeps, Anja | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Dunning, Alison M. | Milne, Roger L. | Bojesen, Stig E. | Swerdlow, Anthony | Andrulis, Irene | Brenner, Hermann | Behrens, Sabine | Orr, Nicholas | Jones, Michael | Ashworth, Alan | Li, Jingmei | Cramp, Helen | Connley, Dan | Czene, Kamila | Darabi, Hatef | Chanock, Stephen J. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Knight, Julia | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna M. | Dumont, Martine | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Olson, Janet | Vachon, Celine | Purrington, Kristen | Moisse, Matthieu | Neven, Patrick | Wildiers, Hans | Spurdle, Amanda | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Kataja, Vesa | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Hamann, Ute | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Dieffenbach, Aida K. | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Malats, Núria | Arias Perez, JoséI. | Benítez, Javier | Flyger, Henrik | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Truong, Théresè | Cordina-Duverger, Emilie | Menegaux, Florence | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | Häberle, Lothar | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Ekici, Arif B. | Braaf, Linde | Atsma, Femke | van den Broek, Alexandra J. | Makalic, Enes | Schmidt, Daniel F. | Southey, Melissa C. | Cox, Angela | Simard, Jacques | Giles, Graham G. | Lambrechts, Diether | Mannermaa, Arto | Brauch, Hiltrud | Guénel, Pascal | Peto, Julian | Fasching, Peter A. | Hopper, John | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Couch, Fergus | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Pharoah, Paul D. P. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Hall, Per | Easton, Douglas F. | Chang-Claude, Jenny
Genetic epidemiology  2013;38(1):84-93.
Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10−07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10−05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci.
doi:10.1002/gepi.21771
PMCID: PMC3995140  PMID: 24248812
breast cancer risk; gene-environment interaction; polymorphisms; body mass index; case-control study
5.  Common genetic polymorphisms modify the effect of smoking on absolute risk of bladder cancer 
Cancer research  2013;73(7):2211-2220.
Bladder cancer results from the combined effects of environmental and genetic factors, smoking being the strongest risk factor. Evaluating absolute risks resulting from the joint effects of smoking and genetic factors is critical to evaluate the public health relevance of genetic information. Analyses included up to 3,942 cases and 5,680 controls of European background in seven studies. We tested for multiplicative and additive interactions between smoking and 12 susceptibility loci, individually and combined as a polygenic risk score (PRS). Thirty-year absolute risks and risk differences by levels of the PRS were estimated for US-males aged 50-years. Six out of 12 variants showed significant additive gene-environment interactions, most notably NAT2 (P=7×10-4) and UGT1A6 (P=8×10-4). The 30-year absolute risk of bladder cancer in US males was 6.2% for all current smokers. This risk ranged from 2.9% for current smokers in the lowest quartile of the PRS to 9.9% for current smokers in the upper quartile. Risk difference estimates indicated that 8,200 cases would be prevented if elimination of smoking occurred in 100,000 men in the upper PRS quartile, compared to 2,000 cases prevented by a similar effort in the lowest PRS quartile (P-additive =1×10-4). The impact of eliminating smoking the on number of bladder cancer cases prevented is larger for individuals at higher than lower genetic risk. Our findings could have implications for targeted prevention strategies. However, other smoking-related diseases, as well as practical and ethical considerations, need to be considered before any recommendations could be made.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-2388
PMCID: PMC3688270  PMID: 23536561
6.  Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative–specific breast cancer risk loci 
Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Couch, Fergus J | Lindstrom, Sara | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Brook, Mark N | orr, Nick | Rhie, Suhn Kyong | Riboli, Elio | Feigelson, Heather s | Le Marchand, Loic | Buring, Julie E | Eccles, Diana | Miron, Penelope | Fasching, Peter A | Brauch, Hiltrud | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Carpenter, Jane | Godwin, Andrew K | Nevanlinna, Heli | Giles, Graham G | Cox, Angela | Hopper, John L | Bolla, Manjeet K | Wang, Qin | Dennis, Joe | Dicks, Ed | Howat, Will J | Schoof, Nils | Bojesen, Stig E | Lambrechts, Diether | Broeks, Annegien | Andrulis, Irene L | Guénel, Pascal | Burwinkel, Barbara | Sawyer, Elinor J | Hollestelle, Antoinette | Fletcher, Olivia | Winqvist, Robert | Brenner, Hermann | Mannermaa, Arto | Hamann, Ute | Meindl, Alfons | Lindblom, Annika | Zheng, Wei | Devillee, Peter | Goldberg, Mark S | Lubinski, Jan | Kristensen, Vessela | Swerdlow, Anthony | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Dörk, Thilo | Muir, Kenneth | Matsuo, Keitaro | Wu, Anna H | Radice, Paolo | Teo, Soo Hwang | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Blot, William | Kang, Daehee | Hartman, Mikael | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | Shen, Chen-Yang | Southey, Melissa C | Park, Daniel J | Hammet, Fleur | Stone, Jennifer | Veer, Laura J Van’t | Rutgers, Emiel J | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Stewart-Brown, Sarah | Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep | Peto, Julian | Schrauder, Michael G | Ekici, Arif B | Beckmann, Matthias W | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Johnson, Nichola | Warren, Helen | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael J | Miller, Nicola | Marme, Federick | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Truong, Therese | Laurent-Puig, Pierre | Kerbrat, Pierre | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Nielsen, Sune F | Flyger, Henrik | Milne, Roger L | Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Menéndez, Primitiva | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Lichtner, Peter | Lochmann, Magdalena | Justenhoven, Christina | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Muranen, Taru A | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Greco, Dario | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Ito, Hidemi | Iwata, Hiroji | Yatabe, Yasushi | Antonenkova, Natalia N | Margolin, Sara | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M | Balleine, Rosemary | Tseng, Chiu-Chen | Van Den Berg, David | Stram, Daniel O | Neven, Patrick | Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie | Leunen, Karin | Rudolph, Anja | Nickels, Stefan | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Peterlongo, Paolo | Peissel, Bernard | Bernard, Loris | Olson, Janet E | Wang, Xianshu | Stevens, Kristen | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Mclean, Catriona | Coetzee, Gerhard A | Feng, Ye | Henderson, Brian E | Schumacher, Fredrick | Bogdanova, Natalia V | Labrèche, France | Dumont, Martine | Yip, Cheng Har | Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd | Cheng, Ching-Yu | Shrubsole, Martha | Long, Jirong | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Kauppila, Saila | knight, Julia A | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Tollenaar, Robertus A E M | Seynaeve, Caroline M | Kriege, Mieke | Hooning, Maartje J | Van den Ouweland, Ans M W | Van Deurzen, Carolien H M | Lu, Wei | Gao, Yu-Tang | Cai, Hui | Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P | Cross, Simon S | Reed, Malcolm W R | Signorello, Lisa | Cai, Qiuyin | Shah, Mitul | Miao, Hui | Chan, Ching Wan | Chia, Kee Seng | Jakubowska, Anna | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Hsiung, Chia-Ni | Wu, Pei-Ei | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Ashworth, Alan | Jones, Michael | Tessier, Daniel C | González-Neira, Anna | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M Rosario | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, Francois | Ambrosone, Christine B | Bandera, Elisa V | John, Esther M | Chen, Gary K | Hu, Jennifer J | Rodriguez-gil, Jorge L | Bernstein, Leslie | Press, Michael F | Ziegler, Regina G | Millikan, Robert M | Deming-Halverson, Sandra L | Nyante, Sarah | Ingles, Sue A | Waisfisz, Quinten | Tsimiklis, Helen | Makalic, Enes | Schmidt, Daniel | Bui, Minh | Gibson, Lorna | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Schmutzler, Rita K | Hein, Rebecca | Dahmen, Norbert | Beckmann, Lars | Aaltonen, Kirsimari | Czene, Kamila | Irwanto, Astrid | Liu, Jianjun | Turnbull, Clare | Rahman, Nazneen | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Olswold, Curtis | Slager, Susan | Pilarski, Robert | Ademuyiwa, Foluso | Konstantopoulou, Irene | Martin, Nicholas G | Montgomery, Grant W | Slamon, Dennis J | Rauh, Claudia | Lux, Michael P | Jud, Sebastian M | Bruning, Thomas | Weaver, Joellen | Sharma, Priyanka | Pathak, Harsh | Tapper, Will | Gerty, Sue | Durcan, Lorraine | Trichopoulos, Dimitrios | Tumino, Rosario | Peeters, Petra H | Kaaks, Rudolf | Campa, Daniele | Canzian, Federico | Weiderpass, Elisabete | Johansson, Mattias | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Travis, Ruth | Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise | Kolonel, Laurence N | Chen, Constance | Beck, Andy | Hankinson, Susan E | Berg, Christine D | Hoover, Robert N | Lissowska, Jolanta | Figueroa, Jonine D | Chasman, Daniel I | Gaudet, Mia M | Diver, W Ryan | Willett, Walter C | Hunter, David J | Simard, Jacques | Benitez, Javier | Dunning, Alison M | Sherman, Mark E | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Chanock, Stephen J | Hall, Per | Pharoah, Paul D P | Vachon, Celine | Easton, Douglas F | Haiman, Christopher A | Kraft, Peter
Nature genetics  2013;45(4):392-398e2.
Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20–30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry1. The etiology2 and clinical behavior3 of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition4. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10−12 and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10−8), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10−8) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10−8), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers.
doi:10.1038/ng.2561
PMCID: PMC3771695  PMID: 23535733
7.  Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other analgesic use and bladder cancer in northern New England 
A few epidemiologic studies have found that use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with reduced risk of bladder cancer. However, the effects of specific NSAID use and individual variability in risk have not been well studied. We examined the association between NSAIDs use and bladder cancer risk, and its modification by 39 candidate genes related to NSAID metabolism. A population-based case–control study was conducted in northern New England, enrolling 1,171 newly diagnosed cases and 1,418 controls. Regular use of nonaspirin, nonselective NSAIDs was associated with reduced bladder cancer risk, with a statistically significant inverse trend in risk with duration of use (ORs of 1.0, 0.8, 0.6 and 0.6 for <5, 5–9, 10–19 and 201 years, respectively; ptrend = 0.015). This association was driven mainly by ibuprofen; significant inverse trends in risk with increasing duration and dose of ibuprofen were observed (ptrend = 0.009 and 0.054, respectively). The reduced risk from ibuprofen use was limited to individuals carrying the T allele of a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs4646450) compared to those who did not use ibuprofen and did not carry the T allele in the CYP3A locus, providing new evidence that this association might be modified by polymorphisms in genes that metabolize ibuprofen. Significant positive trends in risk with increasing duration and cumulative dose of selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors were observed. Our results are consistent with those from previous studies linking use of NSAIDs, particularly ibuprofen, with reduced risk. We observed a previously unrecognized risk associated with use of COX-2 inhibitors, which merits further evaluation.
doi:10.1002/ijc.27590
PMCID: PMC3951299  PMID: 22505343
bladder cancer; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; gene–drug interaction; CYP3A
8.  Breast cancer susceptibility associated with rs1219648 (FGFR2) and postmenopausal hormone therapy use in a population-based U.S. study 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)  2013;20(3):354-358.
Objective
Genome-wide association studies have consistently found variants in FGFR2 to be associated with breast cancer. Recent reports suggest that postmenopausal hormone therapy use may modify the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in FGFR2 and breast cancer risk. We assessed the hypothesis that the association between rs1219648 (FGFR2) single nucleotide polymorphism and breast cancer risk is modified by postmenopausal hormone therapy use in a population-based case-control study.
Methods
We evaluated rs1219648 single nucleotide polymorphism for an association with breast cancer risk using data obtained from 869 postmenopausal breast cancer cases diagnosed between the years of 1995-2000 and 808 postmenopausal community controls who participated in a study conducted in three U.S. states. Detailed postmenopausal hormone therapy information was collected through a structured telephone interview and DNA samples were collected through the mail using an established mouthwash protocol. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression models adjusted for age and state of residence.
Results
We observed a significant association with the rs1219648 and breast cancer risk (per-allele OR=1.22, 95%CI: 1.06-1.41; p-value=0.007), which did not vary significantly by ever use of estrogen plus progestogen therapy (interaction p-value=0.48). There was stronger evidence of an interaction between ever use of estrogen-only hormone therapy and increasing number of rs1219648 risk alleles to increase breast cancer risk (interaction p-value=0.08).
Conclusions
Our results are consistent with a risk association for FGFR2 but provide limited support for interaction with hormone therapy use. The study raises the possibility that the FGFR2 rs1219648 variant is more strongly associated with risk in estrogen-only hormone users, though this observation needs to be examined in larger studies.
doi:10.1097/GME.0b013e318268ca46
PMCID: PMC3549049  PMID: 23435034
breast cancer; genetics; hormone therapy; gene-environment interaction; epidemiology
9.  DNA mismatch repair gene MSH6 implicated in determining age at natural menopause 
Perry, John R.B. | Hsu, Yi-Hsiang | Chasman, Daniel I. | Johnson, Andrew D. | Elks, Cathy | Albrecht, Eva | Andrulis, Irene L. | Beesley, Jonathan | Berenson, Gerald S. | Bergmann, Sven | Bojesen, Stig E. | Bolla, Manjeet K. | Brown, Judith | Buring, Julie E. | Campbell, Harry | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Corre, Tanguy | Couch, Fergus J. | Cox, Angela | Czene, Kamila | D'adamo, Adamo Pio | Davies, Gail | Deary, Ian J. | Dennis, Joe | Easton, Douglas F. | Engelhardt, Ellen G. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Esko, Tõnu | Fasching, Peter A. | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Flyger, Henrik | Fraser, Abigail | Garcia-Closas, Montse | Gasparini, Paolo | Gieger, Christian | Giles, Graham | Guenel, Pascal | Hägg, Sara | Hall, Per | Hayward, Caroline | Hopper, John | Ingelsson, Erik | Kardia, Sharon L.R. | Kasiman, Katherine | Knight, Julia A. | Lahti, Jari | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Magnusson, Patrik K.E. | Margolin, Sara | Marsh, Julie A. | Metspalu, Andres | Olson, Janet E. | Pennell, Craig E. | Polasek, Ozren | Rahman, Iffat | Ridker, Paul M. | Robino, Antonietta | Rudan, Igor | Rudolph, Anja | Salumets, Andres | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Schoemaker, Minouk J. | Smith, Erin N. | Smith, Jennifer A. | Southey, Melissa | Stöckl, Doris | Swerdlow, Anthony J. | Thompson, Deborah J. | Truong, Therese | Ulivi, Sheila | Waldenberger, Melanie | Wang, Qin | Wild, Sarah | Wilson, James F | Wright, Alan F. | Zgaga, Lina | Ong, Ken K. | Murabito, Joanne M. | Karasik, David | Murray, Anna
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;23(9):2490-2497.
The length of female reproductive lifespan is associated with multiple adverse outcomes, including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and infertility. The biological processes that govern the timing of the beginning and end of reproductive life are not well understood. Genetic variants are known to contribute to ∼50% of the variation in both age at menarche and menopause, but to date the known genes explain <15% of the genetic component. We have used genome-wide association in a bivariate meta-analysis of both traits to identify genes involved in determining reproductive lifespan. We observed significant genetic correlation between the two traits using genome-wide complex trait analysis. However, we found no robust statistical evidence for individual variants with an effect on both traits. A novel association with age at menopause was detected for a variant rs1800932 in the mismatch repair gene MSH6 (P = 1.9 × 10−9), which was also associated with altered expression levels of MSH6 mRNA in multiple tissues. This study contributes to the growing evidence that DNA repair processes play a key role in ovarian ageing and could be an important therapeutic target for infertility.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt620
PMCID: PMC3976329  PMID: 24357391
10.  A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11 
Siddiq, Afshan | Couch, Fergus J. | Chen, Gary K. | Lindström, Sara | Eccles, Diana | Millikan, Robert C. | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Stram, Daniel O. | Beckmann, Lars | Rhie, Suhn Kyong | Ambrosone, Christine B. | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Amiano, Pilar | Apicella, Carmel | Baglietto, Laura | Bandera, Elisa V. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Berg, Christine D. | Bernstein, Leslie | Blomqvist, Carl | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brinton, Louise | Bui, Quang M. | Buring, Julie E. | Buys, Saundra S. | Campa, Daniele | Carpenter, Jane E. | Chasman, Daniel I. | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chen, Constance | Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S. | Czene, Kamila | Deming, Sandra L. | Diasio, Robert B. | Diver, W. Ryan | Dunning, Alison M. | Durcan, Lorraine | Ekici, Arif B. | Fasching, Peter A. | Feigelson, Heather Spencer | Fejerman, Laura | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Fletcher, Olivia | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Gaudet, Mia M. | Gerty, Susan M. | Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L. | Giles, Graham G. | van Gils, Carla H. | Godwin, Andrew K. | Graham, Nikki | Greco, Dario | Hall, Per | Hankinson, Susan E. | Hartmann, Arndt | Hein, Rebecca | Heinz, Judith | Hoover, Robert N. | Hopper, John L. | Hu, Jennifer J. | Huntsman, Scott | Ingles, Sue A. | Irwanto, Astrid | Isaacs, Claudine | Jacobs, Kevin B. | John, Esther M. | Justenhoven, Christina | Kaaks, Rudolf | Kolonel, Laurence N. | Coetzee, Gerhard A. | Lathrop, Mark | Le Marchand, Loic | Lee, Adam M. | Lee, I-Min | Lesnick, Timothy | Lichtner, Peter | Liu, Jianjun | Lund, Eiliv | Makalic, Enes | Martin, Nicholas G. | McLean, Catriona A. | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne | Meindl, Alfons | Miron, Penelope | Monroe, Kristine R. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Nickels, Stefan | Nyante, Sarah J. | Olswold, Curtis | Overvad, Kim | Palli, Domenico | Park, Daniel J. | Palmer, Julie R. | Pathak, Harsh | Peto, Julian | Pharoah, Paul | Rahman, Nazneen | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Schmidt, Daniel F. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Slager, Susan | Southey, Melissa C. | Stevens, Kristen N. | Sinn, Hans-Peter | Press, Michael F. | Ross, Eric | Riboli, Elio | Ridker, Paul M. | Schumacher, Fredrick R. | Severi, Gianluca | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Stone, Jennifer | Sund, Malin | Tapper, William J. | Thun, Michael J. | Travis, Ruth C. | Turnbull, Clare | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Waisfisz, Quinten | Wang, Xianshu | Wang, Zhaoming | Weaver, JoEllen | Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger | Wilkens, Lynne R. | Van Den Berg, David | Zheng, Wei | Ziegler, Regina G. | Ziv, Elad | Nevanlinna, Heli | Easton, Douglas F. | Hunter, David J. | Henderson, Brian E. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Kraft, Peter | Haiman, Christopher A. | Vachon, Celine M.
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(24):5373-5384.
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P ≤ 1 × 10-5 in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR = 1.16; P = 1.1 × 10−8) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR = 1.08, P = 1.3 × 10–6) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR = 1.01, P = 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.12; P = 1.1 × 10−9), and with both ER-positive (OR = 1.09; P = 1.5 × 10−5) and ER-negative (OR = 1.16, P = 2.5 × 10−7) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds381
PMCID: PMC3510753  PMID: 22976474
11.  Likelihood Ratio Test for Detecting Gene (G)-Environment (E) Interactions Under an Additive Risk Model Exploiting G-E Independence for Case-Control Data 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2012;176(11):1060-1067.
There has been a long-standing controversy in epidemiology with regard to an appropriate risk scale for testing interactions between genes (G) and environmental exposure (E ). Although interaction tests based on the logistic model—which approximates the multiplicative risk for rare diseases—have been more widely applied because of its convenience in statistical modeling, interactions under additive risk models have been regarded as closer to true biologic interactions and more useful in intervention-related decision-making processes in public health. It has been well known that exploiting a natural assumption of G-E independence for the underlying population can dramatically increase statistical power for detecting multiplicative interactions in case-control studies. However, the implication of the independence assumption for tests for additive interaction has not been previously investigated. In this article, the authors develop a likelihood ratio test for detecting additive interactions for case-control studies that incorporates the G-E independence assumption. Numerical investigation of power suggests that incorporation of the independence assumption can enhance the efficiency of the test for additive interaction by 2- to 2.5-fold. The authors illustrate their method by applying it to data from a bladder cancer study.
doi:10.1093/aje/kws166
PMCID: PMC3571244  PMID: 23118105
additive risk model; case-control studies; gene-environment independence; gene-environment interaction; multiplicative risk model
12.  Prediction of breast cancer risk by genetic risk factors, overall and by hormone receptor status 
Journal of medical genetics  2012;49(9):601-608.
Objective
There is increasing interest in adding common genetic variants identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) to breast cancer risk prediction models. First results from such models showed modest benefits in terms of risk discrimination. Heterogeneity of breast cancer as defined by hormone-receptor status has not been considered in this context. In this study we investigated the predictive capacity of 32 GWAS-detected common variants for breast cancer risk, alone and in combination with classical risk factors, and for tumors with different hormone receptor status.
Material and Methods
Within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), we analyzed 6009 invasive breast cancer cases and 7827 matched controls of European ancestry, with data on classical breast cancer risk factors and 32 common gene variants identified through GWAS. Discriminatory ability with respect to breast cancer of specific hormone receptor-status was assessed with the age- and cohort-adjusted concordance statistic (AUROCa). Absolute risk scores were calculated with external reference data. Integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) was used to measure improvements in risk prediction.
Results
We found a small but steady increase in discriminatory ability with increasing numbers of genetic variants included in the model (difference in AUROCa going from 2.7 to 4%). Discriminatory ability for all models varied strongly by hormone receptor status
Discussion and Conclusion
Adding information on common polymorphisms provides small but statistically significant improvements in the quality of breast cancer risk prediction models. We consistently observed better performance for receptor positive cases, but the gain in discriminatory quality is not sufficient for clinical application.
doi:10.1136/jmedgenet-2011-100716
PMCID: PMC3793888  PMID: 22972951
breast cancer; risk prediction; genetic factors; hormone receptor status
13.  The role of genetic breast cancer susceptibility variants as prognostic factors 
Fasching, Peter A. | Pharoah, Paul D.P. | Cox, Angela | Nevanlinna, Heli | Bojesen, Stig E. | Karn, Thomas | Broeks, Annegien | van Leeuwen, Flora E. | van 't Veer, Laura J. | Udo, Renate | Dunning, Alison M. | Greco, Dario | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Shah, Mitul | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Flyger, Henrik | Hopper, John L. | Southey, Melissa C. | Apicella, Carmel | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Sherman, Mark | Lissowska, Jolanta | Seynaeve, Caroline | Huijts, Petra E.A. | Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M. | Ziogas, Argyrios | Ekici, Arif B. | Rauh, Claudia | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Andrulis, Irene L. | Ozcelik, Hilmi | Mulligan, Anna-Marie | Glendon, Gord | Hall, Per | Czene, Kamila | Liu, Jianjun | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Eilber, Ursula | Nickels, Stefan | Dörk, Thilo | Schiekel, Maria | Bremer, Michael | Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Hooning, Maartje J. | Martens, John W.M. | Jager, Agnes | Kriege, Mieke | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Couch, Fergus J. | Stevens, Kristen N. | Olson, Janet E. | Kosel, Matthew | Cross, Simon S. | Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P. | Reed, Malcolm W.R. | Miron, Alexander | John, Esther M. | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Kauppila, Saila | Burwinkel, Barbara | Marme, Frederik | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Lambrechts, Diether | Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie | Hatse, Sigrid | van Limbergen, Erik | Benitez, Javier | Milne, Roger L. | Zamora, M. Pilar | Pérez, José Ignacio Arias | Bonanni, Bernardo | Peissel, Bernard | Loris, Bernard | Peterlongo, Paolo | Rajaraman, Preetha | Schonfeld, Sara J. | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Devilee, Peter | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Slamon, Dennis J. | Phillips, Kelly-Anne | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Humphreys, Manjeet K. | Easton, Douglas F. | Schmidt, Marjanka K.
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(17):3926-3939.
Recent genome-wide association studies identified 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated these and 62 other SNPs for their prognostic relevance. Confirmed BC risk SNPs rs17468277 (CASP8), rs1982073 (TGFB1), rs2981582 (FGFR2), rs13281615 (8q24), rs3817198 (LSP1), rs889312 (MAP3K1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs13387042 (2q35), rs4973768 (SLC4A7), rs6504950 (COX11) and rs10941679 (5p12) were genotyped for 25 853 BC patients with the available follow-up; 62 other SNPs, which have been suggested as BC risk SNPs by a GWAS or as candidate SNPs from individual studies, were genotyped for replication purposes in subsets of these patients. Cox proportional hazard models were used to test the association of these SNPs with overall survival (OS) and BC-specific survival (BCS). For the confirmed loci, we performed an accessory analysis of publicly available gene expression data and the prognosis in a different patient group. One of the 11 SNPs, rs3803662 (TOX3) and none of the 62 candidate/GWAS SNPs were associated with OS and/or BCS at P<0.01. The genotypic-specific survival for rs3803662 suggested a recessive mode of action [hazard ratio (HR) of rare homozygous carriers=1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35, P=0.0002 and HR=1.29; 95% CI: 1.12–1.47, P=0.0003 for OS and BCS, respectively]. This association was seen similarly in all analyzed tumor subgroups defined by nodal status, tumor size, grade and estrogen receptor. Breast tumor expression of these genes was not associated with prognosis. With the exception of rs3803662 (TOX3), there was no evidence that any of the SNPs associated with BC susceptibility were associated with the BC survival. Survival may be influenced by a distinct set of germline variants from those influencing susceptibility.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds159
PMCID: PMC3412377  PMID: 22532573
14.  Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci 
Ghoussaini, Maya | Fletcher, Olivia | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Turnbull, Clare | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Dicks, Ed | Dennis, Joe | Wang, Qin | Humphreys, Manjeet K | Luccarini, Craig | Baynes, Caroline | Conroy, Don | Maranian, Melanie | Ahmed, Shahana | Driver, Kristy | Johnson, Nichola | Orr, Nicholas | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Waisfisz, Quinten | Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Hall, Per | Czene, Kamila | Irwanto, Astrid | Liu, Jianjun | Nevanlinna, Heli | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Meindl, Alfons | Schmutzler, Rita K | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Lichtner, Peter | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Hein, Rebecca | Nickels, Stefan | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Tsimiklis, Helen | Makalic, Enes | Schmidt, Daniel | Bui, Minh | Hopper, John L | Apicella, Carmel | Park, Daniel J | Southey, Melissa | Hunter, David J | Chanock, Stephen J | Broeks, Annegien | Verhoef, Senno | Hogervorst, Frans BL | Fasching, Peter A. | Lux, Michael P. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Ekici, Arif B. | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael | Marme, Frederik | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Burwinkel, Barbara | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Thérèse | Cordina-Duverger, Emilie | Menegaux, Florence | Bojesen, Stig E | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Nielsen, Sune F | Flyger, Henrik | Milne, Roger L. | Alonso, M. Rosario | González-Neira, Anna | Benítez, Javier | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Ziogas, Argyrios | Bernstein, Leslie | Dur, Christina Clarke | Brenner, Hermann | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Justenhoven, Christina | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brüning, Thomas | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Eilber, Ursula | Dörk, Thilo | Schürmann, Peter | Bremer, Michael | Hillemanns, Peter | Bogdanova, Natalia V. | Antonenkova, Natalia N. | Rogov, Yuri I. | Karstens, Johann H. | Bermisheva, Marina | Prokofieva, Darya | Khusnutdinova, Elza | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M | Lambrechts, Diether | Yesilyurt, Betul T. | Floris, Giuseppe | Leunen, Karin | Manoukian, Siranoush | Bonanni, Bernardo | Fortuzzi, Stefano | Peterlongo, Paolo | Couch, Fergus J | Wang, Xianshu | Stevens, Kristen | Lee, Adam | Giles, Graham G. | Baglietto, Laura | Severi, Gianluca | McLean, Catriona | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Kristensen, Vessela | Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise | John, Esther M. | Miron, Alexander | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Kauppila, Saila | Andrulis, Irene L. | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Devilee, Peter | van Asperen, Christie J. | Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M. | Seynaeve, Caroline | Figueroa, Jonine D | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Brinton, Louise | Lissowska, Jolanta | Hooning, Maartje J. | Hollestelle, Antoinette | Oldenburg, Rogier A. | van den Ouweland, Ans M.W. | Cox, Angela | Reed, Malcolm WR | Shah, Mitul | Jakubowska, Ania | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Jones, Michael | Schoemaker, Minouk | Ashworth, Alan | Swerdlow, Anthony | Beesley, Jonathan | Chen, Xiaoqing | Muir, Kenneth R | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Rattanamongkongul, Suthee | Chaiwerawattana, Arkom | Kang, Daehee | Yoo, Keun-Young | Noh, Dong-Young | Shen, Chen-Yang | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Wu, Pei-Ei | Hsiung, Chia-Ni | Perkins, Annie | Swann, Ruth | Velentzis, Louiza | Eccles, Diana M | Tapper, Will J | Gerty, Susan M | Graham, Nikki J | Ponder, Bruce A. J. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Pharoah, Paul D.P. | Lathrop, Mark | Dunning, Alison M. | Rahman, Nazneen | Peto, Julian | Easton, Douglas F
Nature genetics  2012;44(3):312-318.
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ~ 8% of the heritability of the disease. We followed up 72 promising associations from two independent Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) in ~70,000 cases and ~68,000 controls from 41 case-control studies and nine breast cancer GWAS. We identified three new breast cancer risk loci on 12p11 (rs10771399; P=2.7 × 10−35), 12q24 (rs1292011; P=4.3×10−19) and 21q21 (rs2823093; P=1.1×10−12). SNP rs10771399 was associated with similar relative risks for both estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and ER-positive breast cancer, whereas the other two loci were associated only with ER-positive disease. Two of the loci lie in regions that contain strong plausible candidate genes: PTHLH (12p11) plays a crucial role in mammary gland development and the establishment of bone metastasis in breast cancer, while NRIP1 (21q21) encodes an ER co-factor and has a role in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth.
doi:10.1038/ng.1049
PMCID: PMC3653403  PMID: 22267197
15.  Mapping of the UGT1A locus identifies an uncommon coding variant that affects mRNA expression and protects from bladder cancer 
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(8):1918-1930.
A recent genome-wide association study of bladder cancer identified the UGT1A gene cluster on chromosome 2q37.1 as a novel susceptibility locus. The UGT1A cluster encodes a family of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), which facilitate cellular detoxification and removal of aromatic amines. Bioactivated forms of aromatic amines found in tobacco smoke and industrial chemicals are the main risk factors for bladder cancer. The association within the UGT1A locus was detected by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11892031. Now, we performed detailed resequencing, imputation and genotyping in this region. We clarified the original genetic association detected by rs11892031 and identified an uncommon SNP rs17863783 that explained and strengthened the association in this region (allele frequency 0.014 in 4035 cases and 0.025 in 5284 controls, OR = 0.55, 95%CI = 0.44–0.69, P = 3.3 × 10−7). Rs17863783 is a synonymous coding variant Val209Val within the functional UGT1A6.1 splicing form, strongly expressed in the liver, kidney and bladder. We found the protective T allele of rs17863783 to be associated with increased mRNA expression of UGT1A6.1 in in-vitro exontrap assays and in human liver tissue samples. We suggest that rs17863783 may protect from bladder cancer by increasing the removal of carcinogens from bladder epithelium by the UGT1A6.1 protein. Our study shows an example of genetic and functional role of an uncommon protective genetic variant in a complex human disease, such as bladder cancer.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr619
PMCID: PMC3313801  PMID: 22228101
16.  Cytoplasmic Estrogen Receptor in breast cancer 
Clinical Cancer Research  2011;18(1):118-126.
Purpose
In addition to genomic signaling, it is accepted that ERα has non-nuclear signaling functions, which correlate with tamoxifen resistance in preclinical models. However, evidence for cytoplasmic ER localization in human breast tumors is less established. We sought to determine the presence and implications of non-nuclear ER in clinical specimens.
Experimental Design
A panel of ERα-specific antibodies (SP1, MC20, F10, 60c, 1D5) were validated by western blot and quantitative immunofluorescent (QIF) analysis of cell lines and patient controls. Then eight retrospective cohorts collected on tissue microarrays were assessed for cytoplasmic ER. Four cohorts were from Yale (YTMA 49, 107, 130, 128) and four others (NCI YTMA 99, South Swedish Breast Cancer Group SBII, NSABP B14, and a Vietnamese Cohort) from other sites around the world.
Results
Four of the antibodies specifically recognized ER by western and QIF, showed linear increases in amounts of ER in cell line series with progressively increasing ER, and the antibodies were reproducible on YTMA 49 with pearson’s correlations (r2 values)ranging from 0.87-0.94. One antibody with striking cytoplasmic staining (MC20) failed validation. We found evidence for specific cytoplasmic staining with the other 4 antibodies across eight cohorts. The average incidence was 1.5%, ranging from 0 to 3.2%.
Conclusions
Our data shows ERα present in the cytoplasm in a number of cases using multiple antibodies, while reinforcing the importance of antibody validation. In nearly 3,200 cases, cytoplasmic ER is present at very low incidence, suggesting its measurement is unlikely to be of routine clinical value.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-11-1236
PMCID: PMC3263348  PMID: 21980134
non-nuclear; Estrogen Receptor; cytoplasmic; breast cancer
17.  Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium† 
Figueroa, Jonine D. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Humphreys, Manjeet | Platte, Radka | Hopper, John L. | Southey, Melissa C. | Apicella, Carmel | Hammet, Fleur | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Broeks, Annegien | Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M. | Van't Veer, Laura J. | Fasching, Peter A. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Ekici, Arif B. | Strick, Reiner | Peto, Julian | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael | Burwinkel, Barbara | Marme, Federik | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Bojesen, Stig | Flyger, Henrik | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Benítez, Javier | Milne, Roger L. | Ignacio Arias, Jose | Zamora, M. Pilar | Brenner, Hermann | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Rahman, Nazneen | Turnbull, Clare | Seal, Sheila | Renwick, Anthony | Brauch, Hiltrud | Justenhoven, Christina | Brüning, Thomas | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Hein, Rebecca | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Dörk, Thilo | Schürmann, Peter | Bremer, Michael | Hillemanns, Peter | Nevanlinna, Heli | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Bogdanova, Natalia | Antonenkova, Natalia | Rogov, Yuri I. | Karstens, Johann Hinrich | Bermisheva, Marina | Prokofieva, Darya | Hanafievich Gantcev, Shamil | Khusnutdinova, Elza | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Beesley, Jonathan | Chen, Xiaoqing | Mannermaa, Arto | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Soini, Ylermi | Kataja, Vesa | Lambrechts, Diether | Yesilyurt, Betül T. | Chrisiaens, Marie-Rose | Peeters, Stephanie | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Barile, Monica | Couch, Fergus | Lee, Adam M. | Diasio, Robert | Wang, Xianshu | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Maclean, Catriona | Offit, Ken | Robson, Mark | Joseph, Vijai | Gaudet, Mia | John, Esther M. | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Andrulis, Irene | Knight, Julia A. | Marie Mulligan, Anna | O'Malley, Frances P. | Brinton, Louise A. | Sherman, Mark E. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Chanock, Stephen J. | Hooning, Maartje | Martens, John W.M. | van den Ouweland, Ans M.W. | Collée, J. Margriet | Hall, Per | Czene, Kamila | Cox, Angela | Brock, Ian W. | Reed, Malcolm W.R. | Cross, Simon S. | Pharoah, Paul | Dunning, Alison M. | Kang, Daehee | Yoo, Keun-Young | Noh, Dong-Young | Ahn, Sei-Hyun | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | Gaborieau, Valerie | Brennan, Paul | McKay, James | Shen, Chen-Yang | Ding, Shian-ling | Hsu, Huan-Ming | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Ziogas, Argyrios | Ashworth, Alan | Swerdlow, Anthony | Jones, Michael | Orr, Nick | Trentham-Dietz, Amy | Egan, Kathleen | Newcomb, Polly | Titus-Ernstoff, Linda | Easton, Doug | Spurdle, Amanda B.
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(23):4693-4706.
A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), we sought to determine whether risks differ by ER, progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), grade, node status, tumor size, and ductal or lobular morphology. We genotyped rs11249433 at 1p.11.2, and two highly correlated SNPs rs999737 and rs10483813 (r2= 0.98) at 14q24.1 (RAD51L1), for up to 46 036 invasive breast cancer cases and 46 930 controls from 39 studies. Analyses by tumor characteristics focused on subjects reporting to be white women of European ancestry and were based on 25 458 cases, of which 87% had ER data. The SNP at 1p11.2 showed significantly stronger associations with ER-positive tumors [per-allele odds ratio (OR) for ER-positive tumors was 1.13, 95% CI = 1.10–1.16 and, for ER-negative tumors, OR was 1.03, 95% CI = 0.98–1.07, case-only P-heterogeneity = 7.6 × 10−5]. The association with ER-positive tumors was stronger for tumors of lower grade (case-only P= 6.7 × 10−3) and lobular histology (case-only P= 0.01). SNPs at 14q24.1 were associated with risk for most tumor subtypes evaluated, including triple-negative breast cancers, which has not been described previously. Our results underscore the need for large pooling efforts with tumor pathology data to help refine risk estimates for SNP associations with susceptibility to different subtypes of breast cancer.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr368
PMCID: PMC3209823  PMID: 21852249
18.  Detectable clonal mosaicism and its relationship to aging and cancer 
Jacobs, Kevin B | Yeager, Meredith | Zhou, Weiyin | Wacholder, Sholom | Wang, Zhaoming | Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin | Hutchinson, Amy | Deng, Xiang | Liu, Chenwei | Horner, Marie-Josephe | Cullen, Michael | Epstein, Caroline G | Burdett, Laurie | Dean, Michael C | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | Sampson, Joshua | Chung, Charles C | Kovaks, Joseph | Gapstur, Susan M | Stevens, Victoria L | Teras, Lauren T | Gaudet, Mia M | Albanes, Demetrius | Weinstein, Stephanie J | Virtamo, Jarmo | Taylor, Philip R | Freedman, Neal D | Abnet, Christian C | Goldstein, Alisa M | Hu, Nan | Yu, Kai | Yuan, Jian-Min | Liao, Linda | Ding, Ti | Qiao, You-Lin | Gao, Yu-Tang | Koh, Woon-Puay | Xiang, Yong-Bing | Tang, Ze-Zhong | Fan, Jin-Hu | Aldrich, Melinda C | Amos, Christopher | Blot, William J | Bock, Cathryn H | Gillanders, Elizabeth M | Harris, Curtis C | Haiman, Christopher A | Henderson, Brian E | Kolonel, Laurence N | Le Marchand, Loic | McNeill, Lorna H | Rybicki, Benjamin A | Schwartz, Ann G | Signorello, Lisa B | Spitz, Margaret R | Wiencke, John K | Wrensch, Margaret | Wu, Xifeng | Zanetti, Krista A | Ziegler, Regina G | Figueroa, Jonine D | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Malats, Nuria | Marenne, Gaelle | Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila | Baris, Dalsu | Schwenn, Molly | Johnson, Alison | Landi, Maria Teresa | Goldin, Lynn | Consonni, Dario | Bertazzi, Pier Alberto | Rotunno, Melissa | Rajaraman, Preetha | Andersson, Ulrika | Freeman, Laura E Beane | Berg, Christine D | Buring, Julie E | Butler, Mary A | Carreon, Tania | Feychting, Maria | Ahlbom, Anders | Gaziano, J Michael | Giles, Graham G | Hallmans, Goran | Hankinson, Susan E | Hartge, Patricia | Henriksson, Roger | Inskip, Peter D | Johansen, Christoffer | Landgren, Annelie | McKean-Cowdin, Roberta | Michaud, Dominique S | Melin, Beatrice S | Peters, Ulrike | Ruder, Avima M | Sesso, Howard D | Severi, Gianluca | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Visvanathan, Kala | White, Emily | Wolk, Alicja | Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne | Zheng, Wei | Silverman, Debra T | Kogevinas, Manolis | Gonzalez, Juan R | Villa, Olaya | Li, Donghui | Duell, Eric J | Risch, Harvey A | Olson, Sara H | Kooperberg, Charles | Wolpin, Brian M | Jiao, Li | Hassan, Manal | Wheeler, William | Arslan, Alan A | Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H | Fuchs, Charles S | Gallinger, Steven | Gross, Myron D | Holly, Elizabeth A | Klein, Alison P | LaCroix, Andrea | Mandelson, Margaret T | Petersen, Gloria | Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine | Bracci, Paige M | Canzian, Federico | Chang, Kenneth | Cotterchio, Michelle | Giovannucci, Edward L | Goggins, Michael | Bolton, Judith A Hoffman | Jenab, Mazda | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Krogh, Vittorio | Kurtz, Robert C | McWilliams, Robert R | Mendelsohn, Julie B | Rabe, Kari G | Riboli, Elio | Tjønneland, Anne | Tobias, Geoffrey S | Trichopoulos, Dimitrios | Elena, Joanne W | Yu, Herbert | Amundadottir, Laufey | Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z | Kraft, Peter | Schumacher, Fredrick | Stram, Daniel | Savage, Sharon A | Mirabello, Lisa | Andrulis, Irene L | Wunder, Jay S | García, Ana Patiño | Sierrasesúmaga, Luis | Barkauskas, Donald A | Gorlick, Richard G | Purdue, Mark | Chow, Wong-Ho | Moore, Lee E | Schwartz, Kendra L | Davis, Faith G | Hsing, Ann W | Berndt, Sonja I | Black, Amanda | Wentzensen, Nicolas | Brinton, Louise A | Lissowska, Jolanta | Peplonska, Beata | McGlynn, Katherine A | Cook, Michael B | Graubard, Barry I | Kratz, Christian P | Greene, Mark H | Erickson, Ralph L | Hunter, David J | Thomas, Gilles | Hoover, Robert N | Real, Francisco X | Fraumeni, Joseph F | Caporaso, Neil E | Tucker, Margaret | Rothman, Nathaniel | Pérez-Jurado, Luis A | Chanock, Stephen J
Nature genetics  2012;44(6):651-658.
In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls drawn from 13 genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones from DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. Mosaic chromosomal abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of size >2 Mb were observed in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%) with abnormal cell proportions between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, the frequency increased with age; 0.23% under 50 and 1.91% between 75 and 79 (p=4.8×10−8). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid-tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals, OR=1.25, p=0.016), with a stronger association for cases who had DNA collected prior to diagnosis or treatment (OR=1.45, p=0.0005). Detectable clonal mosaicism was common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least one year prior to diagnosis of leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR=35.4, p=3.8×10−11). These findings underscore the importance of the role and time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and other late-onset diseases.
doi:10.1038/ng.2270
PMCID: PMC3372921  PMID: 22561519
19.  A genome-wide association study of bladder cancer identifies a new susceptibility locus within SLC14A1, a urea transporter gene on chromosome 18q12.3 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(21):4282-4289.
Genome-wide and candidate-gene association studies of bladder cancer have identified 10 susceptibility loci thus far. We conducted a meta-analysis of two previously published genome-wide scans (4501 cases and 6076 controls of European background) and followed up the most significant association signals [17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 10 genomic regions] in 1382 cases and 2201 controls from four studies. A combined analysis adjusted for study center, age, sex, and smoking status identified a novel susceptibility locus that mapped to a region of 18q12.3, marked by rs7238033 (P = 8.7 × 10–9; allelic odds ratio 1.20 with 95% CI: 1.13–1.28) and two highly correlated SNPs, rs10775480/rs10853535 (r2= 1.00; P = 8.9 × 10–9; allelic odds ratio 1.16 with 95% CI: 1.10–1.22). The signal localizes to the solute carrier family 14 member 1 gene, SLC14A1, a urea transporter that regulates cellular osmotic pressure. In the kidney, SLC14A1 regulates urine volume and concentration whereas in erythrocytes it determines the Kidd blood groups. Our findings suggest that genetic variation in SLC14A1 could provide new etiological insights into bladder carcinogenesis.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr342
PMCID: PMC3188994  PMID: 21824976
20.  Correction: Comparison of 6q25 Breast Cancer Hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) 
Hein, Rebecca | Maranian, Melanie | Hopper, John L. | Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K. | Southey, Melissa C. | Park, Daniel J. | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Broeks, Annegien | Hogervorst, Frans B. L. | Bueno-de-Mesquit, H. Bas | Muir, Kenneth R. | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Rattanamongkongul, Suthee | Puttawibul, Puttisak | Fasching, Peter A. | Hein, Alexander | Ekici, Arif B. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Peto, Julian | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael | Miller, Nicola | Marmee, Frederick | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Burwinkel, Barbara | Guénel, Pascal | Cordina-Duverger, Emilie | Menegaux, Florence | Truong, Thérèse | Bojesen, Stig E. | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Flyger, Henrik | Milne, Roger L. | Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Zamora, M. Pilar | Benítez, Javier | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Ziogas, Argyrios | Bernstein, Leslie | Clarke, Christina A. | Brenner, Hermann | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Rahman, Nazneen | Seal, Sheila | Turnbull, Clare | Renwick, Anthony | Meindl, Alfons | Schott, Sarah | Bartram, Claus R. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Brauch, Hiltrud | Hamann, Ute | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Dörk, Thilo | Schürmann, Peter | Karstens, Johann H. | Hillemanns, Peter | Nevanlinna, Heli | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Bogdanova, Natalia V. | Zalutsky, Iosif V. | Antonenkova, Natalia N. | Bermisheva, Marina | Prokovieva, Darya | Farahtdinova, Albina | Khusnutdinova, Elza | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana | Chen, Xiaoqing | Beesley, Jonathan | Investigators, kConFab | Lambrechts, Diether | Zhao, Hui | Neven, Patrick | Wildiers, Hans | Nickels, Stefan | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Barile, Monica | Couch, Fergus J. | Olson, Janet E. | Wang, Xianshu | Fredericksen, Zachary | Giles, Graham G. | Baglietto, Laura | McLean, Catriona A. | Severi, Gianluca | Offit, Kenneth | Robson, Mark | Gaudet, Mia M. | Vijai, Joseph | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Kristensen, Vessela | Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | John, Esther M. | Miron, Alexander | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Figueroa, Jonine D. | García-Closas, Montserrat | Lissowska, Jolanta | Sherman, Mark E. | Hooning, Maartje | Martens, John W. M. | Seynaeve, Caroline | Collée, Margriet | Hall, Per | Humpreys, Keith | Czene, Kamila | Liu, Jianjun | Cox, Angela | Brock, Ian W. | Cross, Simon S. | Reed, Malcolm W. R. | Ahmed, Shahana | Ghoussaini, Maya | Pharoah, Paul DP. | Kang, Daehee | Yoo, Keun-Young | Noh, Dong-Young | Jakubowska, Anna | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Złowocka, Elżbieta | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | Gaborieau, Valerie | Brennan, Paul | McKay, James | Shen, Chen-Yang | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Hsu, Huan-Ming | Hou, Ming-Feng | Orr, Nick | Schoemaker, Minouk | Ashworth, Alan | Swerdlow, Anthony | Trentham-Dietz, Amy | Newcomb, Polly A. | Titus, Linda | Egan, Kathleen M. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Antoniou, Antonis C. | Humphreys, Manjeet K. | Morrison, Jonathan | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Easton, Douglas F. | Dunning, Alison M.
PLoS ONE  2012;7(10):10.1371/annotation/e5de602c-0ffc-4e6f-a2ed-f79913c2e57c.
doi:10.1371/annotation/e5de602c-0ffc-4e6f-a2ed-f79913c2e57c
PMCID: PMC3525690
21.  19p13.1 is a triple negative-specific breast cancer susceptibility locus 
Stevens, Kristen N. | Fredericksen, Zachary | Vachon, Celine M. | Wang, Xianshu | Margolin, Sara | Lindblom, Annika | Nevanlinna, Heli | Greco, Dario | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Vrieling, Alina | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Sinn, Hans-Peter | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Nickels, Stefan | Brauch, Hiltrud | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Fischer, Hans-Peter | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Meindl, Alfons | Bartram, Claus R. | Schott, Sarah | Engel, Christof | Godwin, Andrew K. | Weaver, JoEllen | Pathak, Harsh B. | Sharma, Priyanka | Brenner, Hermann | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Miron, Penelope | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Stavropoulou, Alexandra | Fountzilas, George | Gogas, Helen J. | Swann, Ruth | Dwek, Miriam | Perkins, Annie | Milne, Roger L. | Benítez, Javier | Zamora, M Pilar | Pérez, José Ignacio Arias | Bojesen, Stig E. | Nielsen, Sune F. | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Flyger, Henrik | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Thérèse | Menegaux, Florence | Cordina-Duverger, Emilie | Burwinkel, Barbara | Marmé, Frederick | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael J. | Peto, Julian | Johnson, Nichola | Fletcher, Olivia | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Fasching, Peter A. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Hartmann, Arndt | Ekici, Arif B. | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Muir, Kenneth | Puttawibul, Puttisak | Wiangnon, Surapon | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Broeks, Annegien | Braaf, Linde M | Rosenberg, Efraim H | Hopper, John L. | Apicella, Carmel | Park, Daniel J. | Southey, Melissa C. | Swerdlow, Anthony J. | Ashworth, Alan | Orr, Nicholas | Schoemaker, Minouk J. | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Ziogas, Argyrios | Bernstein, Leslie | Dur, Christina Clarke | Shen, Chen-Yang | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Hsu, Huan-Ming | Hsiung, Chia-Ni | Hamann, Ute | Dünnebier, Thomas | Rüdiger, Thomas | Ulmer, Hans Ulrich | Pharoah, Paul P. | Dunning, Alison M | Humphreys, Manjeet K. | Wang, Qin | Cox, Angela | Cross, Simon S. | Reed, Malcom W. | Hall, Per | Czene, Kamila | Ambrosone, Christine B. | Ademuyiwa, Foluso | Hwang, Helena | Eccles, Diana M. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Sherman, Mark E. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Devilee, Peter | Seynaeve, Caroline | Tollenaar, R.A.E.M. | Hooning, Maartje J. | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | John, Esther M. | Miron, Alexander | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Kristensen, Vessela | Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | Giles, Graham G. | Baglietto, Laura | McLean, Catriona A | Severi, Gianluca | Kosel, Matthew L. | Pankratz, V.S. | Slager, Susan | Olson, Janet E. | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Barile, Monica | Lambrechts, Diether | Hatse, Sigrid | Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie | Christiaens, Marie-Rose | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Beesley, Jonathan | Chen, Xiaoqing | Mannermaa, Arto | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Soini, Ylermi | Easton, Douglas F. | Couch, Fergus J.
Cancer Research  2012;72(7):1795-1803.
The 19p13.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus is a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is also associated with risk of ovarian cancer. Here we investigated 19p13.1 variation and risk of breast cancer subtypes, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status, using 48,869 breast cancer cases and 49,787 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Variants from 19p13.1 were not associated with breast cancer overall or with ER-positive breast cancer but were significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk [rs8170 Odds Ratio (OR)=1.10, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.05 – 1.15, p=3.49 × 10-5] and triple negative (TN) (ER, PR and HER2 negative) breast cancer [rs8170 OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.13 – 1.31, p=2.22 × 10-7]. However, rs8170 was no longer associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk when TN cases were excluded [OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.89 – 1.07, p=0.62]. In addition, a combined analysis of TN cases from BCAC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (n=3,566) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8170 and TN breast cancer risk [OR=1.25, 95% CI 1.18 – 1.33, p=3.31 × 10-13]. Thus, 19p13.1 is the first triple negative-specific breast cancer risk locus and the first locus specific to a histological subtype defined by ER, PR, and HER2 to be identified. These findings provide convincing evidence that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer varies by tumor subtype and that triple negative tumors and other subtypes likely arise through distinct etiologic pathways.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-3364
PMCID: PMC3319792  PMID: 22331459
genetic susceptibility; association study; subtype; neoplasms; common variant
22.  Comparison of 6q25 Breast Cancer Hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) 
Hein, Rebecca | Maranian, Melanie | Hopper, John L. | Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K. | Southey, Melissa C. | Park, Daniel J. | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Broeks, Annegien | Hogervorst, Frans B. L. | Bueno-de-Mesquit, H. Bas | Muir, Kenneth R. | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Rattanamongkongul, Suthee | Puttawibul, Puttisak | Fasching, Peter A. | Hein, Alexander | Ekici, Arif B. | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | dos Santos Silva, Isabel | Peto, Julian | Sawyer, Elinor | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael | Miller, Nicola | Marmee, Frederick | Schneeweiss, Andreas | Sohn, Christof | Burwinkel, Barbara | Guénel, Pascal | Cordina-Duverger, Emilie | Menegaux, Florence | Truong, Thérèse | Bojesen, Stig E. | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Flyger, Henrik | Milne, Roger L. | Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Zamora, M. Pilar | Benítez, Javier | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Ziogas, Argyrios | Bernstein, Leslie | Clarke, Christina A. | Brenner, Hermann | Müller, Heiko | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Rahman, Nazneen | Seal, Sheila | Turnbull, Clare | Renwick, Anthony | Meindl, Alfons | Schott, Sarah | Bartram, Claus R. | Schmutzler, Rita K. | Brauch, Hiltrud | Hamann, Ute | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Dörk, Thilo | Schürmann, Peter | Karstens, Johann H. | Hillemanns, Peter | Nevanlinna, Heli | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Bogdanova, Natalia V. | Zalutsky, Iosif V. | Antonenkova, Natalia N. | Bermisheva, Marina | Prokovieva, Darya | Farahtdinova, Albina | Khusnutdinova, Elza | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana | Chen, Xiaoqing | Beesley, Jonathan | Investigators, kConFab | Lambrechts, Diether | Zhao, Hui | Neven, Patrick | Wildiers, Hans | Nickels, Stefan | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Radice, Paolo | Peterlongo, Paolo | Manoukian, Siranoush | Barile, Monica | Couch, Fergus J. | Olson, Janet E. | Wang, Xianshu | Fredericksen, Zachary | Giles, Graham G. | Baglietto, Laura | McLean, Catriona A. | Severi, Gianluca | Offit, Kenneth | Robson, Mark | Gaudet, Mia M. | Vijai, Joseph | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Kristensen, Vessela | Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | John, Esther M. | Miron, Alexander | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Andrulis, Irene L. | Knight, Julia A. | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Figueroa, Jonine D. | García-Closas, Montserrat | Lissowska, Jolanta | Sherman, Mark E. | Hooning, Maartje | Martens, John W. M. | Seynaeve, Caroline | Collée, Margriet | Hall, Per | Humpreys, Keith | Czene, Kamila | Liu, Jianjun | Cox, Angela | Brock, Ian W. | Cross, Simon S. | Reed, Malcolm W. R. | Ahmed, Shahana | Ghoussaini, Maya | Pharoah, Paul DP. | Kang, Daehee | Yoo, Keun-Young | Noh, Dong-Young | Jakubowska, Anna | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Złowocka, Elżbieta | Sangrajrang, Suleeporn | Gaborieau, Valerie | Brennan, Paul | McKay, James | Shen, Chen-Yang | Yu, Jyh-Cherng | Hsu, Huan-Ming | Hou, Ming-Feng | Orr, Nick | Schoemaker, Minouk | Ashworth, Alan | Swerdlow, Anthony | Trentham-Dietz, Amy | Newcomb, Polly A. | Titus, Linda | Egan, Kathleen M. | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Antoniou, Antonis C. | Humphreys, Manjeet K. | Morrison, Jonathan | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Easton, Douglas F. | Dunning, Alison M.
PLoS ONE  2012;7(8):e42380.
The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europeans, and a GWAS in Europeans identified a different SNP, tagged here by rs12662670. We examined the associations of both SNPs in up to 61,689 cases and 58,822 controls from forty-four studies collaborating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, of which four studies were of Asian and 39 of European descent. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Case-only analyses were used to compare SNP effects in Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+) versus negative (ER−) tumours. Models including both SNPs were fitted to investigate whether the SNP effects were independent. Both SNPs are significantly associated with breast cancer risk in both ethnic groups. Per-allele ORs are higher in Asian than in European studies [rs2046210: OR (A/G) = 1.36 (95% CI 1.26–1.48), p = 7.6×10−14 in Asians and 1.09 (95% CI 1.07–1.11), p = 6.8×10−18 in Europeans. rs12662670: OR (G/T) = 1.29 (95% CI 1.19–1.41), p = 1.2×10−9 in Asians and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08–1.17), p = 3.8×10−9 in Europeans]. SNP rs2046210 is associated with a significantly greater risk of ER− than ER+ tumours in Europeans [OR (ER−) = 1.20 (95% CI 1.15–1.25), p = 1.8×10−17 versus OR (ER+) = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04–1.1), p = 1.3×10−7, pheterogeneity = 5.1×10−6]. In these Asian studies, by contrast, there is no clear evidence of a differential association by tumour receptor status. Each SNP is associated with risk after adjustment for the other SNP. These results suggest the presence of two variants at 6q25.1 each independently associated with breast cancer risk in Asians and in Europeans. Of these two, the one tagged by rs2046210 is associated with a greater risk of ER− tumours.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0042380
PMCID: PMC3413660  PMID: 22879957
23.  Analysis of terminal duct lobular unit involution in luminal A and basal breast cancers 
Introduction
Involution of terminal duct lobular units (TDLUs), the structures that give rise to most breast cancers, has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Data suggest that the etiology and pathogenesis of luminal A and core basal phenotype (CBP) breast cancers differ, but associations with TDLU involution are unknown. Accordingly, we performed a masked microscopic assessment of TDLU involution in benign tissues associated with luminal A and CBP breast cancers diagnosed among women less than age 55 years.
Methods
Cases were participants in a population-based case-control study conducted in Poland. Increased TDLU involution was defined as fewer acini per TDLU or shorter TDLU diameter. Luminal A was defined as estrogen receptor (ER) positive and/or progesterone receptor (PR) positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative and CBP as negative for ER, PR, and HER2 with expression of basal cytokeratins or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We performed logistic regression to evaluate associations between TDLU involution and tumor subtypes, adjusted for clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk factors.
Results
Among 232 luminal A and 49 CBP cancers associated with evaluable TDLUs, CBP tumors were associated with significantly greater average number of acini per TDLU (odds ratio (OR) = 3.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.36 to 8.32, P = 0.009) and larger average TDLU diameter (OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.08 to 5.74, P = 0.03; comparing highest to lowest group, adjusted for age and study site).
Conclusions
We suggest that TDLU involution is less marked in benign tissues surrounding CBP as compared to luminal A cancers, which may reflect differences in the etiology and pathogenesis of these tumor subtypes.
doi:10.1186/bcr3170
PMCID: PMC3446399  PMID: 22513288
24.  A single nucleotide polymorphism tags variation in the arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 phenotype in populations of European background 
Pharmacogenetics and genomics  2011;21(4):231-236.
Objective
The arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) slow acetylation phenotype is an established risk factor for urinary bladder cancer. We previously reported on this risk association using NAT2 phenotypic categories inferred from NAT2 haplotypes based on 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a study in Spain. In a subsequent genome-wide scan, we have identified a single common tag SNP (rs1495741) located in the 3′ end of NAT2 that is also associated with bladder cancer risk. The aim of this report is to evaluate the agreement between the common tag SNP and the 7-SNP NAT2 inferred phenotype.
Methods
The agreement between the 7-SNP NAT2 inferred phenotype and the tag SNP, rs1495741, was initially assessed in 2,174 subjects from the Spanish Bladder Cancer Study (SBCS), and confirmed in a subset of subjects from the Main and Vermont component the New England Bladder Cancer Study (NEBCS). We also investigated the association of rs1495741 genotypes with NAT2 catalytic activity in cryopreserved hepatocytes from 154 individuals of European background.
Results
We observed very strong agreement between rs1495741 and the 7-SNP inferred NAT2 phenotype: sensitivity and specificity for the NAT2 slow phenotype was 99% and 95%, respectively. Our findings were replicated in an independent population from the United States. Estimates for the association between NAT2 slow phenotype and bladder cancer risk in the SBCS and its interaction with cigarette smoking were comparable for the 7-SNP inferred NAT2 phenotype and rs1495741. In addition, rs1495741 genotypes were strongly related to NAT2 activity measured in hepatocytes (P<0.0001).
Conclusion
A novel NAT2 tag SNP (rs1495741) predicts with high accuracy the 7- SNP inferred NAT2 phenotype, and thus can be used as a sole marker in pharmacogenetic or epidemiological studies of populations of European background. These findings illustrate the utility of tag SNPs, often employed in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), to identify novel phenotypic markers. Further studies are required to determine the functional implications of this novel SNP and the structure and evolution of the haplotype on which it resides.
doi:10.1097/FPC.0b013e32833e1b54
PMCID: PMC3003749  PMID: 20739907
25.  Large-Scale Pathway-Based Analysis of Bladder Cancer Genome-Wide Association Data from Five Studies of European Background 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(1):e29396.
Pathway analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) offer a unique opportunity to collectively evaluate genetic variants with effects that are too small to be detected individually. We applied a pathway analysis to a bladder cancer GWAS containing data from 3,532 cases and 5,120 controls of European background (n = 5 studies). Thirteen hundred and ninety-nine pathways were drawn from five publicly available resources (Biocarta, Kegg, NCI-PID, HumanCyc, and Reactome), and we constructed 22 additional candidate pathways previously hypothesized to be related to bladder cancer. In total, 1421 pathways, 5647 genes and ∼90,000 SNPs were included in our study. Logistic regression model adjusting for age, sex, study, DNA source, and smoking status was used to assess the marginal trend effect of SNPs on bladder cancer risk. Two complementary pathway-based methods (gene-set enrichment analysis [GSEA], and adapted rank-truncated product [ARTP]) were used to assess the enrichment of association signals within each pathway. Eighteen pathways were detected by either GSEA or ARTP at P≤0.01. To minimize false positives, we used the I2 statistic to identify SNPs displaying heterogeneous effects across the five studies. After removing these SNPs, seven pathways (‘Aromatic amine metabolism’ [PGSEA = 0.0100, PARTP = 0.0020], ‘NAD biosynthesis’ [PGSEA = 0.0018, PARTP = 0.0086], ‘NAD salvage’ [PARTP = 0.0068], ‘Clathrin derived vesicle budding’ [PARTP = 0.0018], ‘Lysosome vesicle biogenesis’ [PGSEA = 0.0023, PARTP<0.00012], ’Retrograde neurotrophin signaling’ [PGSEA = 0.00840], and ‘Mitotic metaphase/anaphase transition’ [PGSEA = 0.0040]) remained. These pathways seem to belong to three fundamental cellular processes (metabolic detoxification, mitosis, and clathrin-mediated vesicles). Identification of the aromatic amine metabolism pathway provides support for the ability of this approach to identify pathways with established relevance to bladder carcinogenesis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0029396
PMCID: PMC3251580  PMID: 22238607

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