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author:("Du, xipengi")
1.  Inputs and outputs of insulin receptor 
Protein & Cell  2014;5(3):203-213.
The insulin receptor (IR) is an important hub in insulin signaling and its activation is tightly regulated. Upon insulin stimulation, IR is activated through autophosphorylation, and consequently phosphorylates several insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins, including IRS1-6, Shc and Gab1. Certain adipokines have also been found to activate IR. On the contrary, PTP, Grb and SOCS proteins, which are responsible for the negative regulation of IR, are characterized as IR inhibitors. Additionally, many other proteins have been identified as IR substrates and participate in the insulin signaling pathway. To provide a more comprehensive understanding of the signals mediated through IR, we reviewed the upstream and downstream signal molecules of IR, summarized the positive and negative modulators of IR, and discussed the IR substrates and interacting adaptor proteins. We propose that the molecular events associated with IR should be integrated to obtain a better understanding of the insulin signaling pathway and diabetes.
doi:10.1007/s13238-014-0030-7
PMCID: PMC3967058  PMID: 24633815
insulin; insulin receptor; signaling
2.  Inputs and outputs of insulin receptor 
Protein & Cell  2014;5(3):203-213.
The insulin receptor (IR) is an important hub in insulin signaling and its activation is tightly regulated. Upon insulin stimulation, IR is activated through autophosphorylation, and consequently phosphorylates several insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins, including IRS1-6, Shc and Gab1. Certain adipokines have also been found to activate IR. On the contrary, PTP, Grb and SOCS proteins, which are responsible for the negative regulation of IR, are characterized as IR inhibitors. Additionally, many other proteins have been identified as IR substrates and participate in the insulin signaling pathway. To provide a more comprehensive understanding of the signals mediated through IR, we reviewed the upstream and downstream signal molecules of IR, summarized the positive and negative modulators of IR, and discussed the IR substrates and interacting adaptor proteins. We propose that the molecular events associated with IR should be integrated to obtain a better understanding of the insulin signaling pathway and diabetes.
doi:10.1007/s13238-014-0030-7
PMCID: PMC3967058  PMID: 24633815
insulin; insulin receptor; signaling
3.  ASEB: a web server for KAT-specific acetylation site prediction 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;40(Web Server issue):W376-W379.
Protein lysine acetylation plays an important role in the normal functioning of cells, including gene expression regulation, protein stability and metabolism regulation. Although large amounts of lysine acetylation sites have been identified via large-scale mass spectrometry or traditional experimental methods, the lysine (K)-acetyl-transferase (KAT) responsible for the acetylation of a given protein or lysine site remains largely unknown due to the experimental limitations of KAT substrate identification. Hence, the in silico prediction of KAT-specific acetylation sites may provide direction for further experiments. In our previous study, we developed the acetylation set enrichment based (ASEB) computer program to predict which KAT-families are responsible for the acetylation of a given protein or lysine site. In this article, we provide KAT-specific acetylation site prediction as a web service. This web server not only provides the online tool and R package for the method in our previous study, but several useful services are also included, such as the integration of protein–protein interaction information to enhance prediction accuracy. This web server can be freely accessed at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/huac.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks437
PMCID: PMC3394258  PMID: 22600735
4.  hUbiquitome: a database of experimentally verified ubiquitination cascades in humans 
Protein ubiquitination is an evolutionarily conserved and functionally diverse post-translational modification achieved through the sequential action of E1-activating enzymes, E2-conjugating enzymes and E3 ligases. A summary of validated ubiquitination substrates have been presented and a prediction of new substrates have been conducted in yeast. However, a systematic summary of human ubiquitination substrates containing experimental evidence and the enzymatic cascade of each substrate is not available. In the present study, hUbiquitome web resource is introduced, a public resource for the retrieval of experimentally verified human ubiquitination enzymes and substrates. hUbiquitome is the first comprehensive database of human ubiquitination cascades. Currently, hUbiquitome has in its repertoire curated data comprising 1 E1 enzyme, 12 E2 enzymes, 138 E3 ligases or complexes, 279 different substrate proteins and 17 deubiquitination enzyme terms. The biological functions of substrates from different kinds of E3s were analyzed using the collected data. The findings show that substrates ubiquitinated by RING (Really Interesting New Gene) E3s are enriched most in apoptosis-related processes, whereas substrates ubiquitinated by other E3s are enriched in gene expression-associated processes. An analysis of the data demonstrates the biological process preferences of the different kinds of E3s. hUbiquitome is the first database to systematically collect experimentally validated ubiquitinated proteins and related ubiquitination cascade enzymes which might be helpful in the field of ubiquitination-modification research.
Database URL: http://202.38.126.151/hmdd/hubi/
doi:10.1093/database/bar055
PMCID: PMC3228279  PMID: 22134927

Results 1-4 (4)