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1.  Maternal Periodontitis Treatment and Child Neurodevelopment at 24 to 28 Months of Age 
Pediatrics  2011;127(5):e1212-e1220.
BACKGROUND:
Some maternal infections are associated with impaired infant cognitive and motor performance. Periodontitis results in frequent bacteremia and elevated serum inflammatory mediators.
OBJECTIVE:
The purpose of this study was to determine if periodontitis treatment in pregnant women affects infant cognitive, motor, or language development.
METHODS:
Children born to women who had participated in a previous trial were assessed between 24 and 28 months of age by using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Third Edition) and the Preschool Language Scale (Fourth Edition). Information about the pregnancy, neonatal period, and home environment was obtained through chart abstractions, laboratory test results, and questionnaires. We compared infants born to women treated for periodontitis before 21 weeks' gestation (treatment group) or after delivery (controls). In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, associations between change in maternal periodontal condition during pregnancy and neurodevelopment scores were tested by using Student's t tests and linear regression.
RESULTS:
A total of 411 of 791 eligible mother/caregiver-child pairs participated. Thirty-seven participating children (9.0%) were born at <37 weeks' gestation. Infants in the treatment and control groups did not differ significantly for adjusted mean cognitive (90.7 vs 91.4), motor (96.8 vs 97.2), or language (92.2 vs 92.1) scores (all P > .5). Results were similar in adjusted analyses. Children of women who experienced greater improvements in periodontal health had significantly higher motor and cognitive scores (P = .01 and .02, respectively), although the effect was small (∼1-point increase for each SD increase in the periodontal measure).
CONCLUSION:
Nonsurgical periodontitis treatment in pregnant women was not associated with cognitive, motor, or language development in these study children.
doi:10.1542/peds.2010-3129
PMCID: PMC3081189  PMID: 21482606
child neurodevelopment; periodontitis; pregnancy; treatment
2.  Change in Periodontitis during Pregnancy and Risk of Preterm Birth and Low Birthweight 
Aim
Determine if periodontitis progression during pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes.
Materials and Methods
We used clinical data and birth outcomes from the OPT Study, which randomized women to receive periodontal treatment before 21 weeks gestation (N=413) or after delivery (410). Birth outcomes were available for 812 women and follow-up periodontal data for 722, including 75 whose pregnancies ended <37 weeks. Periodontitis progression was defined as ≥ 3mm loss of clinical attachment. Birth outcomes were compared between non-progressing and progressing groups using the log rank and t tests, separately in all women and in untreated controls.
Results
The distribution of gestational age at the end of pregnancy (P > 0.1) and mean birthweight (3295 versus 3184 grams, P = 0.11) did not differ significantly between women with and without disease progression. Gestational age and birthweight were not associated with change from baseline in percent of tooth sites with bleeding on probing or between those who did versus did not progress according to a published definition of disease progression (P > 0.05).
Conclusions
In these women with periodontitis and within this study’s limitations, disease progression was not associated with increased risk for delivering a preterm or low birthweight infant.
Clinical Relevance
Scientific Rationale
Maternal periodontitis and disease progression during pregnancy have been associated with elevated risk for preterm birth. We used data from a recent clinical trial to explore possible associations between progressive periodontitis and birth outcomes.
Principal Findings
The distribution of gestational age at delivery and mean birthweights did not differ significantly between women who experienced progressive periodontitis and those who did not.
Clinical Implication
While it is important to treat dental diseases, including periodontitis, during pregnancy, women whose periodontal condition worsens during pregnancy are not at elevated risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.
doi:10.1111/j.1600-051X.2009.01385.x
PMCID: PMC2741139  PMID: 19426177
preterm birth; low birthweight; periodontal disease; pregnancy; disease progression

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