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1.  Segmental chromosomal alterations lead to a higher risk of relapse in infants with MYCN-non-amplified localised unresectable/disseminated neuroblastoma (a SIOPEN collaborative study) 
British Journal of Cancer  2011;105(12):1940-1948.
Background:
In neuroblastoma (NB), the presence of segmental chromosome alterations (SCAs) is associated with a higher risk of relapse.
Methods:
In order to analyse the role of SCAs in infants with localised unresectable/disseminated NB without MYCN amplification, we have performed an array CGH analysis of tumours from infants enroled in the prospective European INES trials.
Results:
Tumour samples from 218 out of 300 enroled patients could be analysed. Segmental chromosome alterations were observed in 11%, 20% and 59% of infants enroled in trials INES99.1 (localised unresectable NB), INES99.2 (stage 4s) and INES99.3 (stage 4) (P<0.0001). Progression-free survival was poorer in patients whose tumours harboured SCA, in the whole population and in trials INES99.1 and INES99.2, in the absence of clinical symptoms (log-rank test, P=0.0001, P=0.04 and P=0.0003, respectively). In multivariate analysis, a SCA genomic profile was the strongest predictor of poorer progression-free survival.
Conclusion:
In infants with stage 4s MYCN-non-amplified NB, a SCA genomic profile identifies patients who will require upfront treatment even in the absence of other clinical indication for therapy, whereas in infants with localised unresectable NB, a genomic profile characterised by the absence of SCA identifies patients in whom treatment reduction might be possible. These findings will be implemented in a future international trial.
doi:10.1038/bjc.2011.472
PMCID: PMC3251887  PMID: 22146831
neuroblastoma; infants; genomic profile; segmental chromosome alterations; prognosis
2.  Treatment of localised resectable neuroblastoma. Results of the LNESG1 study by the SIOP Europe Neuroblastoma Group 
British Journal of Cancer  2008;99(7):1027-1033.
Main objective of this study was to confirm that surgery alone is an effective and safe treatment for localised resectable neuroblastoma except stage 2 with amplified MYCN gene (MYCNA). Of 427 eligible stages 1–2 patients, 411 had normal MYCN and 16 had MYCNA. Of the 288 stage 1 patients with normal MYCN, 1 died of complications and 16 relapsed, 2 of whom died; 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 94.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 91.6–97) and 98.9% (95% CI: 97.7–100), respectively. Of the 123 stage 2 patients with normal MYCN, 1 died of sepsis and 22 relapsed, 8 of whom died (RFS 82.8%, 95% CI: 76.2–89.5; OS 93.2%, 95% CI: 88.7–97.8). In stage 2, OS and RFS were worse for patients with elevated LDH and unfavourable histopathology. Of 16 children with MYCNA, 7 were stage 1 (5 relapses and 4 deaths) and 9 were stage 2 (3 relapses and 2 deaths) patients. In conclusion, surgery alone yielded excellent OS for both stage 1 and 2 neuroblastoma without MYCNA, although stage 2 patients with unfavourable histopathology and elevated LDH suffered a high number of relapses. Both stage 1 and 2 patients with MYCNA were at greater risk of relapse.
doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6604640
PMCID: PMC2567095  PMID: 18766186
neuroblastoma; localised; MYCN gene; prognostic factors
3.  Immunotherapy with low-dose recombinant interleukin 2 after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in neuroblastoma. 
British Journal of Cancer  1998;78(4):528-533.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate in a phase I-II trial whether low doses of recombinant human interleukin 2 (rHuIL-2) over a prolonged period of time are safe and effective in eradicating or controlling minimal residual disease in children with neuroblastoma given high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). From January 1992 to July 1996, 17 consecutive patients, with either stage IV or relapsed neuroblastoma, were enrolled. Patients received rHuIL-2 after a median time interval (min-max) of 105 days (56-153) after HDCT and ASCT. The protocol consisted of 2 'priming' courses of rHuIL-2 at escalating doses administered intravenously at 72-h intervals, followed by 'maintenance' with 11 monthly and six bimonthly boosting 5-day courses administered subcutaneously on an outpatient basis. At April 1997, 7 out of the 17 patients had completed the treatment schedule, four had discontinued treatment because of toxicity and four because of relapse; the remaining two patients are still on treatment, having completed 15 courses. Expansion of T lymphocytes, together with an increase in both natural killer cells and in activated T lymphocytes was evidenced. After a median (min-max) follow-up time of 30 (16-64) months, 12 out of 17 patients are alive and well. Two patients relapsed and died 14 and 35 months after transplant. Three patients are alive after having relapsed at 41, 21 and 13 months. The actuarial 2-year event-free survival and overall survival are 67% and 92% respectively. Intermittent administration of low doses of rHuIL-2 given for a long period of time is well tolerated and seems capable of controlling minimal residual disease after HDCT and ASCT in children with high-risk neuroblastoma.
PMCID: PMC2063104  PMID: 9716039

Results 1-3 (3)