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1.  Plasma-derived medicinal products self-sufficiency from national plasma: to what extent? 
Blood Transfusion  2013;11(Suppl 4):s132-s137.
doi:10.2450/2013.019s
PMCID: PMC3853994  PMID: 24333306
plasma; plasma-products; self-sufficiency; clinical governance
2.  Incidental finding of monoclonal gammopathy in blood donors: a follow-up study 
Blood Transfusion  2012;10(3):338-343.
Background.
The incidental finding of monoclonal immunoglobulin in the sera of healthy blood donors is a relatively frequent event and in such cases the subjects are commonly deferred permanently from donating blood. However, no follow-up studies of these cases have been published so far.
Materials and methods.
Since 2000, all regular blood donors at Trieste Blood Bank have undergone annual screening by serum protein electrophoresis. Cases presenting with monoclonal gammopathy between January 2000 and December 2008 were registered and follow-up was performed until December 2010.
Results.
Out of 8,197 regular blood donors, monoclonal gammopathy was detected in 104 subjects (1.3%). The median age at detection was 53 years, the median monoclonal protein concentration was 0.2 g/dL and the cumulative follow-up of these cases amounted to 763 person/years. In two cases asymptomatic multiple myeloma was diagnosed within 6 months of detection of the gammopathy and in 14 cases, the monoclonal gammopathy was transient. The remaining 88 cases were classified as having monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Out of these, two events related to monoclonal gammopathy were observed during the follow up: one lymphoma and one light chain deposition nephropathy.
Discussion.
According to current prognostic staging systems, the majority of blood donors with monoclonal gammopathy were classified as having low-risk MGUS and had a very low incidence of lymphoproliferative diseases. Permanent deferral of blood donors with stable MGUS causes about a 1% loss of potential blood donations and it represents a “precautionary measure” that needs to be substantiated and validated.
doi:10.2450/2012.0083-11
PMCID: PMC3417733  PMID: 22507857
monoclonal gammopathy; MGUS; multiple myeloma; blood donor
3.  Emergency reversal of anticoagulation: from theory to real use of prothrombin complex concentrates. A retrospective Italian experience 
Blood Transfusion  2012;10(1):87-94.
Background
Prothrombin Complex Concentrates (PCC) are administered to normalise blood coagulation in patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). Rapid reversal of OAT is essential in case of major bleeding, internal haemorrhage or surgery.
The primary end-point was to evaluate whether PCC in our hospital were being used in compliance with international and national guidelines for the reversal of OAT on an emergency basis. The secondary end-point was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PCC.
Materials and methods
All patients receiving OAT who required rapid reversal anticoagulation because they had to undergo emergency surgery or urgent invasive techniques following an overdose of oral anticoagulants were eligible for this retrospective observational study.
Results
Forty-seven patients receiving OAT who needed rapid reverse of anticoagulation were enrolled in our study. The patients were divided in two groups: (i) group A (n=23), patients needed haemostatic treatment before neurosurgery after a head injury and (ii) group B (n=24), patients with critical haemorrhage because of an overdose of oral anticoagulants. The International Normalised Ratio (INR) was checked before and after infusion of the PCC. The mean INR in group A was 2.7 before and 1.43 after infusion of the PCC; in group B the mean INR of 6.58, before and 1.92 after drug infusion. The use of vitamin K, fresh-frozen plasma and red blood cells was also considered. During our study 22 patients died, but no adverse effects following PCC administration were recorded.
Discussion
In our study three-factor-PCC was found to be effective and safe in rapidly reversing the effects of OAT, although it was not always administered in accordance with international or national guidelines. The dose, time of administration and monitoring often differed from those recommended. In the light of these findings, we advocate the use of single standard protocol to guide the correct use of PCC in each hospital ward.
doi:10.2450/2011.0030-11
PMCID: PMC3258994  PMID: 22044952
prothrombin complex concentrate; oral anticoagulant therapy; reversal of anticoagulation guidelines

Results 1-3 (3)