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1.  MCT1 modulates cancer cell pyruvate export and growth of tumors that co-express MCT1 and MCT4 
Cell reports  2016;14(7):1590-1601.
SUMMARY
Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 (MCT1) inhibition is thought to block tumor growth through disruption of lactate transport and glycolysis. Here we show MCT1 inhibition impairs proliferation of glycolytic breast cancer cells co-expressing MCT1 and MCT4 via disruption of pyruvate rather than lactate export. MCT1 expression is elevated in glycolytic breast tumors, and high MCT1 expression predicts poor prognosis in breast and lung cancer patients. Acute MCT1 inhibition reduces pyruvate export but does not consistently alter lactate transport or glycolytic flux in breast cancer cells that co-express MCT1 and MCT4. Despite the lack of glycolysis impairment, MCT1 loss-of-function decreases breast cancer cell proliferation and blocks growth of mammary fat pad xenograft tumors. Our data suggest MCT1 expression is elevated in glycolytic cancers to promote pyruvate export, which when inhibited enhances oxidative metabolism and reduces proliferation. This study presents an alternative molecular consequence of MCT1 inhibitors further supporting their use as anti-cancer therapeutics.
doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2016.01.057
PMCID: PMC4816454  PMID: 26876179
2.  Liquid Biopsy for Detection of Actionable Oncogenic Mutations in Human Cancers and Electric Field Induced Release and Measurement Liquid Biopsy (eLB) 
The Analyst  2016;141(2):393-402.
Oncogenic activations by mutations in key cancer genes such as EGFR and KRAS are frequently associated with human cancers. Molecular targeting of specific oncogenic mutations in human cancer is a major therapeutic inroad for anti-cancer drug therapy. In addition, progressive developments of oncogene mutations lead to drug resistance. Therefore, the ability to detect and continuously monitor key actionable oncogenic mutations is important to guide the use of targeted molecular therapies to improve long-term clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Current oncogenic mutation detection is based on direct sampling of cancer tissue by surgical resection or biopsy. Oncogenic mutations were recently shown to be detectable in circulating bodily fluids of cancer patients. This field of investigation, termed liquid biopsy, permits a less invasive means of assessing the oncogenic mutation profile of a patient. This paper will review the analytical strategies used to assess oncogenic mutations from biofluid samples. Clinical applications will also be discussed.
doi:10.1039/c5an01863c
PMCID: PMC4701580  PMID: 26645892
4.  Ribonucleotide Reductase Subunit M2 Predicts Survival in Subgroups of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma: Effects of Gender and Smoking Status 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(5):e0127600.
Background
Ribonucleotide reductase catalyzes the conversion of ribonucleotide diphosphates to deoxyribonucleotide diphosphates. The functional enzyme consists of two subunits - one large (RRM1) and one small (RRM2 or RRM2b) subunit. Expression levels of each subunit have been implicated in prognostic outcomes in several different types of cancers.
Experimental Design
Immunohistochemistry for RRM1 and RRM2 was performed on a lung cancer tissue microarray (TMA) and analyzed. 326 patients from the microarray were included in this study.
Results
In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), RRM2 expression was strongly predictive of disease-specific survival in women, non-smokers and former smokers who had quit at least 10 years prior to being diagnosed with lung cancer. Higher expression was associated with worse survival. This was not the case for men, current smokers and those who had stopped smoking for shorter periods of time. RRM1 was not predictive of survival outcomes in any subset of the patient group.
Conclusion
RRM2, but not RRM1, is a useful predictor of survival outcome in certain subsets of NSCLC patients.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0127600
PMCID: PMC4441434  PMID: 26001082
5.  Overexpression of Periostin in Stroma Positively Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(3):e0121502.
Background
Periostin is an important extracellular matrix protein involved in cell development and adhesion. Previously, we identified periostin to be up-regulated in aggressive prostate cancer (CaP) using quantitative glycoproteomics and mass spectrometry. The expression of periostin was further evaluated in primary radical prostatectomy (RP) prostate tumors and adjacent non-tumorous prostate tissues using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Our IHC results revealed a low background periostin levels in the adjacent non-tumorous prostate tissues, but overexpressed periostin levels in the peritumoral stroma of primary CaP tumors.
Methods
In this study, periostin expression in CaP was further examined on multiple tissue microarrays (TMAs), which were conducted in four laboratories. To achieve consistent staining, all TMAs were stained with same protocol and scored by same image computation tool to determine the total periostin staining intensities. The TMAs were further scored by pathologists to characterize the stromal staining and epithelial staining.
Results
The periostin staining was observed mainly in peritumoral stromal cells and in some cases in tumor epithelial cells though the stronger staining was found in peritumoral stromal cells. Both periostin stromal staining and epithelial staining can differentiate BPH from CaP including low grade CaP (Gleason score ≤6), with significant p-value of 2.2e-16 and 0.001, respectively. Periostin epithelial staining differentiated PIN from low grade CaP (Gleason score ≤6) (p=0.001), while periostin stromal staining differentiated low grade Cap (Gleason score ≤6) from high grade Cap (Gleason score ≤6) (p=1.7e-05). In addition, a positive correlation between total periostin staining and Gleason score was observed (r=0.87, p=0.002).
Conclusions
The results showed that periostin staining was positively correlated with increasing Gleason score and the aggressiveness of prostate disease.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0121502
PMCID: PMC4362940  PMID: 25781169
6.  High Prevalence of Screen Detected Prostate Cancer in West Africans: Implications for Racial Disparity of Prostate Cancer 
The Journal of urology  2014;192(3):730-735.
Purpose
To our knowledge the reasons for the high rates of prostate cancer in black American men are unknown. Genetic and lifestyle factors have been implicated. Better understanding of prostate cancer rates in West African men would help clarify why black American men have such high rates since the groups share genetic ancestry and yet have different lifestyles and screening practices. To estimate the prostate cancer burden in West African men we performed a population based screening study with biopsy confirmation in Ghana.
Materials and Methods
We randomly selected 1,037 healthy men 50 to 74 years old from Accra, Ghana for prostate cancer screening with prostate specific antigen testing and digital rectal examination. Men with a positive screen result (positive digital rectal examination or prostate specific antigen greater than 2.5 ng/ml) underwent transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies.
Results
Of the 1,037 men 154 (14.9%) had a positive digital rectal examination and 272 (26.2%) had prostate specific antigen greater than 2.5 ng/ml, including 166 with prostate specific antigen greater than 4.0 ng/ml. A total of 352 men (33.9%) had a positive screen by prostate specific antigen or digital rectal examination and 307 (87%) underwent biopsy. Of these men 73 were confirmed to have prostate cancer, yielding a 7.0% screen detected prostate cancer prevalence (65 patients), including 5.8% with prostate specific antigen greater than 4.0 ng/ml.
Conclusions
In this relatively unscreened population in Africa the screen detected prostate cancer prevalence is high, suggesting a possible role of genetics in prostate cancer etiology and the disparity in prostate cancer risk between black and white American men. Further studies are needed to confirm the high prostate cancer burden in African men and the role of genetics in prostate cancer etiology.
doi:10.1016/j.juro.2014.04.017
PMCID: PMC4332806  PMID: 24747091
prostatic neoplasms; prostate-specific antigen; mass screening; African Americans; Africa
7.  Safety of pregabalin among hemodialysis patients suffering from uremic pruritus 
Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the safety and probability of adverse events associated with the use of 75 mg pregabalin post hemodialysis (pHD) among patients with UP. Methods: A cross-sectional study done among the hemodialysis patients suffering from uremic pruritus (UP) Aljaber Kidney Center (AJKC), Al-Ahsa, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. Assessment for the safety profile of pregabalin was done using Naranjo’s algorithm. A predictive model was developed using binary multiple logistic regression to explore association of patients’ demographics and risk factors with the occurrence of AEs. Throughout statistical significance level was considered significant at 0.05. Key findings: Assessment of safety of pregabalin revealed that somnolence and dizziness were the two frequent adverse events followed by constipation, weight gain and edema. However, it was noticed that female patients aged less than 50 years were found to be at a higher risk in comparison with men. Moreover, those patients having one comorbid complication (i.e. hypertension or diabetes mellitus alone) were at a higher risk of somnolence, weight gain and dry mouth. Conclusion: Naranjo’s quantification for the possibility and probability of adverse events reflect that all the events were probable. Age, gender and comorbid medical conditions are some of the factors that might have clinical association with the occurrence of the AEs.
doi:10.1016/j.jsps.2014.10.004
PMCID: PMC4669418  PMID: 26702255
Uremic pruritus; Pregabalin; Post hemodialysis; Adverse events
8.  Development of transcriptomic biomarker signature in human saliva to detect lung cancer 
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women worldwide. Since most of the symptoms found for lung cancer are nonspecific, diagnosis is mostly done at late and progressed stage with the consecutive poor therapy outcome. Effective early detection techniques are sorely needed. The emerging field of salivary diagnostics could provide scientifically credible, easy-to-use, non-invasive and cost-effective detection methods. Recent advances have allowed us to develop discriminatory salivary biomarkers for a variety of diseases from oral to systematic diseases. In this study, salivary transcriptomes of lung cancer patients were profiled and led to the discovery and pre-validation of seven highly discriminatory transcriptomic salivary biomarkers (BRAF, CCNI, EGRF, FGF19, FRS2, GREB1, and LZTS1). The logistic regression model combining five of the mRNA biomarkers (CCNI, EGFR, FGF19, FRS2, and GREB1) could differentiate lung cancer patients from normal control subjects, yielding AUC value of 0.925 with 93.75 % sensitivity and 82.81 % specificity in the pre-validation sample set. These salivary mRNA biomarkers possess the discriminatory power for the detection of lung cancer. This report provides the proof of concept of salivary biomarkers for the non-invasive detection of the systematic disease. These results poised the salivary biomarkers for the initiation of a multi-center validation in a definitive clinical context.
doi:10.1007/s00018-012-1027-0
PMCID: PMC4121486  PMID: 22689099
Human saliva; Transcriptomic; Lung cancer; Biomarker signature; Early detection
9.  Lupus Flare: An Uncommon Presentation of Disseminated Gonorrhea 
Case Reports in Medicine  2014;2014:626095.
Gonorrhea is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the US with 700,000 annual cases. Although most cases of gonorrhea are localized, approximately 0.5–3% become disseminated. Here we discuss a rare case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed septic shock from disseminated gonorrhea infection (DGI). Our patient is a 24-year-old woman with SLE, mixed connective tissue disease with cutaneous vasculitis, and lupus nephritis who presented with several weeks of malaise and generalized body aches associated with a diffuse rash along her fingers, palms, and trunk. Infectious workup was unrevealing with the exception of a positive gonorrhea test obtained from a cervical swab. Given her symptoms of tenosynovitis, the appearance of her skin lesions, and her positive gonorrhea test, she was diagnosed with septic shock secondary to DGI. With antibiotic treatment, the patient reported a dramatic improvement of the pain in her swollen joints and her rash receded. Patients diagnosed with SLE carry an increased risk of gonorrhea regardless of whether or not they are being treated for their SLE. Although it is well-documented that SLE is associated with severe DGI, few describe it resulting in overt septic shock.
doi:10.1155/2014/626095
PMCID: PMC4082902  PMID: 25024709
10.  Disseminated BCG: Complications of Intravesical Bladder Cancer Treatment 
Case Reports in Medicine  2014;2014:362845.
Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been established as an effective treatment of superficial bladder cancer (Parker and Kommu, 2013). However, major side effects, including pneumonitis, sepsis, and even death, may occur in <5% of patients (Gonzalez et al., 2003). Here we present a case of severe disseminated Mycobacterium bovis following intravesical BCG administration. Our patient is a 76-year-old gentleman with newly diagnosed superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder who recently received his first intravesical BCG treatment. He initially presented with hemoptysis and was found to have extensive patchy infiltrates bilaterally. He was treated for pneumonia with antibiotics and then with steroids for hypersensitivity pneumonitis but continued to deteriorate. Due to the temporal proximity of his exposure to BCG, we administered treatment for presumed disseminated BCG infection with rifampin, isoniazid, and ethambutol. Within a 48-hour period, the patient improved dramatically. The reported cases of infection from intravesical BCG illustrate an insidious onset with initial symptoms of low-grade fevers and cystitis but may progress to pneumonitis. If the symptoms persist for more than 7 days or if there is clinical deterioration, RIPE therapy (with rifampin, isoniazid, pyridoxine, and ethambutol) and a fluoroquinolone should be administered for a 6–9-month course along with steroids for 4–6 weeks (Naudžiunas et al., 2012).
doi:10.1155/2014/362845
PMCID: PMC4082927  PMID: 25024707
11.  A depiction of imported malaria in Connecticut 
IDCases  2014;1(2):26-28.
In 2010, there were roughly 219 million cases of malaria reported worldwide resulting in an estimated 660,600 deaths [1]. In contrast, the total number of cases according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States (USA) was only 1691 [2]. Of those, 1688 were cases of imported malaria [2]. This is the highest number of cases reported in U.S. since 1980 [2]. Here, we describe a case of imported malaria and conduct a retrospective case series at four Connecticut (CT) hospitals in order to describe the demographics of imported malaria and to identify potential barriers to timely diagnosis and treatment.
doi:10.1016/j.idcr.2014.03.003
PMCID: PMC4735459  PMID: 26839773
Malaria; Plasmodium falciparum; Connecticut
12.  Prostate cancer cell phenotypes based on AGR2 and CD10 expression 
The combination of expression patterns of AGR2 and CD10 by prostate cancer provided four phenotypes that correlated with clinical outcome. Based on immunophenotyping, CD10lowAGR2high, CD10highAGR2high, CD10lowAGR2low, and CD10highAGR2low were distinguished. AGR2+ tumors were associated with longer recurrence-free survival and CD10+ tumors with shorter recurrence-free survival. In high-stage cases, the CD10lowAGR2high phenotype was associated with a 9-fold higher recurrence-free survival than the CD10highAGR2low phenotype. The CD10highAGR2high and CD10lowAGR2low phenotypes were intermediate. The CD10highAGR2low phenotype was most frequent in high-grade primary tumors. Conversely, bone and other soft tissue metastases, and derivative xenografts, expressed more AGR2 and less CD10. AGR2 protein was readily detected in tumor metastases. The CD10highAGR2low phenotype in primary tumors is predictive of poor outcome; however, the CD10lowAGR2high phenotype is more common in metastases. It appears that AGR2 has a protective function in primary tumors but may have a role in the distal spread of tumor cells.
doi:10.1038/modpathol.2012.238
PMCID: PMC3638070  PMID: 23348903
Prostate cancer; AGR2; CD10; cancer cell phenotypes; patient stratification; bone and soft tissue metastases; xenografts
13.  Fibulin-3 as a Blood and Effusion Biomarker for Pleural Mesothelioma 
The New England journal of medicine  2012;367(15):1417-1427.
BACKGROUND
New biomarkers are needed to detect pleural mesothelioma at an earlier stage and to individualize treatment strategies. We investigated whether fibulin-3 in plasma and pleural effusions could meet sensitivity and specificity criteria for a robust biomarker.
METHODS
We measured fibulin-3 levels in plasma (from 92 patients with mesothelioma, 136 asbestos-exposed persons without cancer, 93 patients with effusions not due to mesothelioma, and 43 healthy controls), effusions (from 74 patients with mesothelioma, 39 with benign effusions, and 54 with malignant effusions not due to mesothelioma), or both. A blinded validation was subsequently performed. Tumor tissue was examined for fibulin-3 by immunohistochemical analysis, and levels of fibulin-3 in plasma and effusions were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
RESULTS
Plasma fibulin-3 levels did not vary according to age, sex, duration of asbestos exposure, or degree of radiographic changes and were significantly higher in patients with pleural mesothelioma (105±7 ng per milliliter in the Detroit cohort and 113±8 ng per milliliter in the New York cohort) than in asbestos-exposed persons without mesothelioma (14±1 ng per milliliter and 24±1 ng per milliliter, respectively; P<0.001). Effusion fibulin-3 levels were significantly higher in patients with pleural mesothelioma (694±37 ng per milliliter in the Detroit cohort and 636±92 ng per milliliter in the New York cohort) than in patients with effusions not due to mesothelioma (212±25 and 151±23 ng per milliliter, respectively; P<0.001). Fibulin-3 preferentially stained tumor cells in 26 of 26 samples. In an overall comparison of patients with and those without mesothelioma, the receiver-operating-characteristic curve for plasma fibulin-3 levels had a sensitivity of 96.7% and a specificity of 95.5% at a cutoff value of 52.8 ng of fibulin-3 per milliliter. In a comparison of patients with early-stage mesothelioma with asbestos-exposed persons, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 94.1% at a cutoff value of 46.0 ng of fibulin-3 per milliliter. Blinded validation revealed an area under the curve of 0.87 for plasma specimens from 96 asbestos-exposed persons as compared with 48 patients with mesothelioma.
CONCLUSIONS
Plasma fibulin-3 levels can distinguish healthy persons with exposure to asbestos from patients with mesothelioma. In conjunction with effusion fibulin-3 levels, plasma fibulin-3 levels can further differentiate mesothelioma effusions from other malignant and benign effusions. (Funded by the Early Detection Research Network, National Institutes of Health, and others.)
doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1115050
PMCID: PMC3761217  PMID: 23050525
14.  Variations of oral microbiota are associated with pancreatic diseases including pancreatic cancer 
Gut  2011;61(4):582-588.
Objective
The associations between oral diseases and increased risk of pancreatic cancer have been reported in several prospective cohort studies. In this study, we measured variations of salivary microbiota and evaluated their potential associations with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis.
Methods
This study was divided into three phases: (1) microbial profiling using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray to investigate salivary microbiota variation between 10 resectable patients with pancreatic cancer and 10 matched healthy controls, (2) identification and verification of bacterial candidates by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and (3) validation of bacterial candidates by qPCR on an independent cohort of 28 resectable pancreatic cancer, 28 matched healthy control and 27 chronic pancreatitis samples.
Results
Comprehensive comparison of the salivary microbiota between patients with pancreatic cancer and healthy control subjects revealed a significant variation of salivary microflora. Thirty-one bacterial species/clusters were increased in the saliva of patients with pancreatic cancer (n=10) in comparison to those of the healthy controls (n=10), whereas 25 bacterial species/clusters were decreased. Two out of six bacterial candidates (Neisseria elongata and Streptococcus mitis) were validated using the independent samples, showing significant variation (p<0.05, qPCR) between patients with pancreatic cancer and controls (n=56). Additionally, two bacteria (Granulicatella adiacens and S mitis) showed significant variation (p<0.05, qPCR) between chronic pancreatitis samples and controls (n=55). The combination of two bacterial biomarkers (N elongata and S mitis) yielded a receiver operating characteristic plot area under the curve value of 0.90 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.96, p<0.0001) with a 96.4% sensitivity and 82.1% specificity in distinguishing patients with pancreatic cancer from healthy subjects.
Conclusions
The authors observed associations between variations of patients’ salivary microbiota with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. This report also provides proof of salivary microbiota as an informative source for discovering non-invasive biomarkers of systemic diseases.
doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2011-300784
PMCID: PMC3705763  PMID: 21994333
15.  Pre-Validation of Salivary Biomarkers for Oral Cancer Detection 
Background
Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer with a five-year survival rate of approximately 60%. Presently there are no scientifically credible early detection techniques beyond conventional clinical oral examination. The goal of this study is to validate if the 7 mRNAs and 3 proteins previously reported biomarkers are capable of discriminating patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) from healthy subjects in independent cohorts and by a National Cancer Institute (NCI)- Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) Biomarker Reference Laboratory (BRL).
Methods
395 subjects from 5 independent cohorts based on case-controlled design were investigated by 2 independent laboratories, UCLA discovery laboratory and NCI-EDRN Biomarker Reference Laboratory (BRL).
Results
Expression of all 7 mRNA and 3 protein markers was increased in OSCC versus controls in all 5 cohorts. With respect to individual marker performance across the 5 cohorts, the increase in IL-8 and SAT were statistically significant and remained top performers across different cohorts in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A previously identified multiple marker model demonstrated an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC)-curve for prediction of OSCC status ranging from of 0.74 to 0.86 across the cohorts.
Conclusions
The validation of these biomarkers demonstrated their feasibility in the discrimination of OSCC from healthy controls. Established assay technologies are robust enough to perform independently. Individual cutoff values for each of these markers and for the combined predictive model need to be further defined in large clinical studies.
Impact
Salivary proteomic and transcriptomic biomarkers can discriminate oral cancer from control subjects.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-1093
PMCID: PMC3319329  PMID: 22301830
16.  Aromatase Expression Predicts Survival in Women with Early-Stage Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer 
Cancer research  2007;67(21):10484-10490.
Estrogen signaling is critical in the progression of tumors that bear estrogen receptors. In most patients with breast cancer, inhibitors that block interactions of estrogen with its receptors or suppress the production of endogenous estrogens are important interventions in the clinic. Recent evidence now suggests that estrogen also contributes to the pathogenesis of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We used a human lung cancer xenograph model system to analyze the effect of aromatase or estradiol on tumor growth. We further examined the level of protein expression of aromatase in 422 patients with NSCLC using a high-density tissue microarray. Results were confirmed and validated on an independent patient cohort (n = 337). Lower levels of aromatase predicted a greater chance of survival in women 65 years and older. Within this population, the prognostic value of aromatase was greatest in earlier stage lung cancer (stage I/II). In addition, for women with no history of smoking, lower aromatase levels were a strong predictor of survival. Our findings implicate aromatase as an early-stage predictor of survival in some women with NSCLC. We predict that women whose lung cancers have higher levels of aromatase might be good candidates for targeted treatment with aromatase inhibitors.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-07-2607
PMCID: PMC3581354  PMID: 17974992
17.  Prostate Cancer Screening in the Randomized Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial: Mortality Results after 13 Years of Follow-up 
Background
The prostate component of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial was undertaken to determine whether there is a reduction in prostate cancer mortality from screening using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and digital rectal examination (DRE). Mortality after 7–10 years of follow-up has been reported previously. We report extended follow-up to 13 years after the trial.
Methods
A total of 76 685 men, aged 55–74 years, were enrolled at 10 screening centers between November 1993 and July 2001 and randomly assigned to the intervention (organized screening of annual PSA testing for 6 years and annual DRE for 4 years; 38 340 men) and control (usual care, which sometimes included opportunistic screening; 38 345 men) arms. Screening was completed in October 2006. All incident prostate cancers and deaths from prostate cancer through 13 years of follow-up or through December 31, 2009, were ascertained. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated as the ratio of observed rates in the intervention and control arms, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated assuming a Poisson distribution for the number of events. Poisson regression modeling was used to examine the interactions with respect to prostate cancer mortality between trial arm and age, comorbidity status, and pretrial PSA testing. All statistical tests were two-sided.
Results
Approximately 92% of the study participants were followed to 10 years and 57% to 13 years. At 13 years, 4250 participants had been diagnosed with prostate cancer in the intervention arm compared with 3815 in the control arm. Cumulative incidence rates for prostate cancer in the intervention and control arms were 108.4 and 97.1 per 10 000 person-years, respectively, resulting in a relative increase of 12% in the intervention arm (RR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.17). After 13 years of follow-up, the cumulative mortality rates from prostate cancer in the intervention and control arms were 3.7 and 3.4 deaths per 10 000 person-years, respectively, resulting in a non-statistically significant difference between the two arms (RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.87 to 1.36). No statistically significant interactions with respect to prostate cancer mortality were observed between trial arm and age (Pinteraction = .81), pretrial PSA testing (Pinteraction = .52), and comorbidity (Pinteraction = .68).
Conclusions
After 13 years of follow-up, there was no evidence of a mortality benefit for organized annual screening in the PLCO trial compared with opportunistic screening, which forms part of usual care, and there was no apparent interaction with age, baseline comorbidity, or pretrial PSA testing.
doi:10.1093/jnci/djr500
PMCID: PMC3260132  PMID: 22228146
18.  Expression Levels of Estrogen Receptor Beta in Conjunction with Aromatase Predict Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 
Estrogen signaling pathways may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) as evidenced by the expression of aromatase and estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) in many of these tumors. Here we examine whether ERα and ERβ levels in conjunction with aromatase define patient groups with respect to survival outcomes and possible treatment regimens. Immunohistochemistry was performed on a high-density tissue microarray with resulting data and clinical information available for 377 patients. Patients were subdivided by gender, age and tumor histology, and survival data was determined using the Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier curves. Neither ERα nor ERβ alone were predictors of survival in NSCLC. However, when coupled with aromatase expression, higher ERβ levels predicted worse survival in patients whose tumors expressed higher levels of aromatase. Although this finding was present in patients of both genders, it was especially pronounced in women ≥ 65 years old, where higher expression of both ERβ and aromatase indicated a markedly worse survival rate than that determined by aromatase alone. Conclusion: Expression of ERβ together with aromatase has predictive value for survival in different gender and age subgroups of NSCLC patients. This predictive value is stronger than each individual marker alone. Our results suggest treatment with aromatase inhibitors alone or combined with estrogen receptor modulators may be of benefit in some subpopulations of these patients.
doi:10.1016/j.lungcan.2011.03.009
PMCID: PMC3175023  PMID: 21511357
NSCLC; tissue microarray; aromatase; estrogen receptor; immunohistochemistry; prognosis
19.  Progesterone and estrogen receptor expression and activity in human non-small cell lung cancer 
Steroids  2011;76(9):910-920.
Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in male and female patients in the US. Although it is clear that tobacco smoking is a major cause of lung cancer, about half of all women with lung cancer worldwide are never-smokers. Despite a declining smoking population, the incidence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the predominant form of lung cancer, has reached epidemic proportions particularly in women. Emerging data suggest that factors other than tobacco, namely endogenous and exogenous female sex hormones, have a role in stimulating NSCLC progression. Aromatase, a key enzyme for estrogen biosynthesis, is expressed in NSCLC. Clinical data show that women with high levels of tumor aromatase (and high intratumoral estrogen) have worse survival than those with low aromatase. The present and previous studies also reveal significant expression and activity of estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ) in both extranuclear and nuclear sites in most NSCLC. We now report further on the expression of progesterone receptor (PR) transcripts and protein in NSCLC. PR transcripts were significantly lower in cancerous as compared to non-malignant tissue. Using immunohistochemistry, expression of PR was observed in the nucleus and/or extranuclear compartments in the majority of human tumor specimens examined. Combinations of estrogen and progestins administered in vitro cooperate in promoting tumor secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and, consequently, support tumor-associated angiogenesis. Further, dual treatment with estradiol and progestin increased the numbers of putative tumor stem/progenitor cells. Thus, ER- and/or PR-targeted therapies may offer new approaches to manage NSCLC.
doi:10.1016/j.steroids.2011.04.015
PMCID: PMC3129425  PMID: 21600232
Progesterone; Estrogen; Steroid hormone receptor; Non-small cell lung cancer; VEGF; Progenitor cells; Cancer stem cells; Angiogenesis
20.  Infectious Mimicry Complicates Diagnosis in Hemophagocytic Syndrome Caused by Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma 
Case Reports in Medicine  2012;2012:968706.
Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) arises secondary to genetic, rheumatologic, neoplastic, and infectious causes. We discuss a patient whose presentation was consistent with systemic infection but was discovered to have HPS of unknown etiology. The presenting symptoms, as well as unremarkable malignancy and rheumatologic workups, led to the pursuit of an infectious cause, but the patient was ultimately discovered to have an occult anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). This case demonstrates the diagnostic challenges that result from infectious mimicry in the context of HPS—first, in distinguishing noninfectious HPS from the systemic inflammation that can result from a widespread infectious process, second, in the identification of the precipitating cause of HPS. While evidence of these challenges has been suggested by the limited literature on HPS and ALCL, our case illustrates the diagnostic dilemma that arises when tissue biopsy does not quickly reveal an etiology. It is important that all physicians be aware that HPS can mimic infection and be prepared to redirect the workup when an infectious etiology for HPS cannot be identified.
doi:10.1155/2012/968706
PMCID: PMC3385285  PMID: 22761627
21.  Higher Levels of GATA3 Predict Better Survival in Women with Breast Cancer 
Human pathology  2010;41(12):1794-1801.
The GATA family members are zinc finger transcription factors involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. GATA3 in particular is necessary for mammary gland maturation, and its loss has been implicated in breast cancer development. Our goal was to validate the ability of GATA3 expression to predict survival in breast cancer patients. Protein expression of GATA3 was analyzed on a high density tissue microarray consisting of 242 cases of breast cancer. We associated GATA3 expression with patient outcomes and clinicopathological variables. Expression of GATA3 was significantly increased in breast cancer, in situ lesions, and hyperplastic tissue compared to normal breast tissue. GATA3 expression decreased with increasing tumor grade. Low GATA3 expression was a significant predictor of disease-related death in all patients, as well as in subgroups of estrogen receptor positive or low grade patients. Additionally, low GATA3 expression correlated with increased tumor size and estrogen and progesterone receptor negativity. GATA3 is an important predictor of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. This finding has been validated in a diverse set of populations. Thus, GATA3 expression has utility as a prognostic indicator in breast cancer.
doi:10.1016/j.humpath.2010.06.010
PMCID: PMC2983489  PMID: 21078439
Tissue microarray; breast cancer; tumor marker; prognostic marker
22.  Higher Expression Levels of 14-3-3 σ in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast Predict Poorer Outcome 
The protein 14-3-3σ is involved in the regulation of cellular processes such as apoptosis, cell cycle progression and proliferation. Disruption of protein expression has been implicated in a number of malignancies. Here we examine the expression pattern of 14-3-3σ in breast cancer and specifically consider whether expression in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions is predictive of disease outcome. We examined 14-3-3σ protein expression and localization using immunohistochemical staining on a high-density tissue microarray consisting of 157 invasive breast cancer patients. Statistical analyses were used to assess the correlation of 14-3-3σ expression with clinico-pathological parameters and patient outcome. We observed a statistically significant increase in 14-3-3σ protein expression in ductal hyperplasia, DCIS, and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) as compared normal glandular epithelium. In IDC, lower expression of 14-3-3σ tended to predicted poorer survival time while in DCIS lesions, there was a stronger correlation between relatively higher levels of 14-3-3σ predicting shorter survival time. Further, of patients who had concurrent DCIS and IDC lesions, those that exhibited a decrease of 14-3-3σ expression from DCIS to IDC had significantly shorter survival time. Our findings indicate that 14-3-3σ expression may be a useful prognostic indicator for survival in patients with breast cancer with an elevated 14-3-3σ in earlier disease predicting a less favorable disease outcome. To our knowledge this is the first published study associating 14-3-3σ protein expression with breast cancer survival.
doi:10.3233/CBM-2009-0106
PMCID: PMC3170666  PMID: 19729831
Tissue microarray; breast cancer; tumor marker; 14-3-3 σ; prognostic marker; DCIS
23.  Presence of a putative tumor-initiating progenitor cell population predicts poor prognosis in smokers with non-small cell lung cancer 
Cancer research  2010;70(16):6639-6648.
Smoking is the most important known risk factor for the development of lung cancer. Tobacco exposure results in chronic inflammation, tissue injury and repair. A recent hypothesis argues for a stem/progenitor cell involved in airway epithelial repair that may be a tumor-initiating cell in lung cancer, and which may be associated with recurrence and metastasis. We used immunostaining, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blots and lung cancer tissue microarrays to identify subpopulations of airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells under steady state conditions, normal repair, aberrant repair with premalignant lesions and lung cancer and their correlation with injury and prognosis. We identified a population of keratin 14 (K14)-expressing progenitor epithelial cells that was involved in repair after injury. Dysregulated repair resulted in persistence of K14+ cells in the airway epithelium in premalignant lesions. The presence of K14+ cells in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples predicted poorer outcomes. This was especially true in smokers where the presence of K14+ cells in NSCLC was predictive of metastasis. The presence of K14+ progenitor airway epithelial cells in NSCLC predicted a poor prognosis and this predictive value was strongest in smokers, where it also correlated with metastasis. This suggests that reparative K14+ progenitor cells may be tumor-initiating cells in this subgroup of smokers with NSCLC.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-0455
PMCID: PMC2924777  PMID: 20710044
Lung carcinogenesis; dysregulated repair; injury
24.  Expression of phosphorylated raf kinase inhibitor protein (pRKIP) is a predictor of lung cancer survival 
BMC Cancer  2011;11:259.
Background
Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) has been reported to negatively regulate signal kinases of major survival pathways. RKIP activity is modulated in part by phosphorylation on Serine 153 by protein kinase C, which leads to dissociation of RKIP from Raf-1. RKIP expression is low in many human cancers and represents an indicator of poor prognosis and/or induction of metastasis. The prognostic power has typically been based on total RKIP expression and has not considered the significance of phospho-RKIP.
Methods
The present study examined the expression levels of both RKIP and phospho-RKIP in human lung cancer tissue microarray proteomics technology.
Results
Total RKIP and phospho-RKIP expression levels were similar in normal and cancerous tissues. phospho-RKIP levels slightly decreased in metastatic lesions. However, the expression levels of phospho-RKIP, in contrast to total RKIP, displayed significant predictive power for outcome with normal expression of phospho-RKIP predicting a more favorable survival compared to lower levels (P = 0.0118); this was even more pronounced in more senior individuals and in those with early stage lung cancer.
Conclusions
This study examines for the first time, the expression profile of RKIP and phospho-RKIP in lung cancer. Significantly, we found that phospho-RKIP was a predictive indicator of survival.
doi:10.1186/1471-2407-11-259
PMCID: PMC3134426  PMID: 21689459
25.  Protein expression based multimarker analysis of breast cancer samples 
BMC Cancer  2011;11:230.
Background
Tissue microarray (TMA) data are commonly used to validate the prognostic accuracy of tumor markers. For example, breast cancer TMA data have led to the identification of several promising prognostic markers of survival time. Several studies have shown that TMA data can also be used to cluster patients into clinically distinct groups. Here we use breast cancer TMA data to cluster patients into distinct prognostic groups.
Methods
We apply weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA) to TMA data consisting of 26 putative tumor biomarkers measured on 82 breast cancer patients. Based on this analysis we identify three groups of patients with low (5.4%), moderate (22%) and high (50%) mortality rates, respectively. We then develop a simple threshold rule using a subset of three markers (p53, Na-KATPase-β1, and TGF β receptor II) that can approximately define these mortality groups. We compare the results of this correlation network analysis with results from a standard Cox regression analysis.
Results
We find that the rule-based grouping variable (referred to as WGCNA*) is an independent predictor of survival time. While WGCNA* is based on protein measurements (TMA data), it validated in two independent Affymetrix microarray gene expression data (which measure mRNA abundance). We find that the WGCNA patient groups differed by 35% from mortality groups defined by a more conventional stepwise Cox regression analysis approach.
Conclusions
We show that correlation network methods, which are primarily used to analyze the relationships between gene products, are also useful for analyzing the relationships between patients and for defining distinct patient groups based on TMA data. We identify a rule based on three tumor markers for predicting breast cancer survival outcomes.
doi:10.1186/1471-2407-11-230
PMCID: PMC3142534  PMID: 21651811
Tissue microarray; breast cancer; tumor marker; prognostic marker; WGCNA

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